340 reputation
110
bio website goocto.com
location Calgary
age 48
visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen yesterday

Been programming applications since 80s and websites since 90s.

Photography, electronics, and RC hobbyist.

Additional interests in robotics, graphic design.

All around experimenter.

Formal training in linguistics.


Dec
17
comment Is “You ain’t seen nothin’ yet” a common or respectable English expression?
Try googling "double negative as an intensifier". Despite what your English teachers wanted you to believe its use is very common colloquially.
Dec
17
comment Is “You ain’t seen nothin’ yet” a common or respectable English expression?
Also B.T.O. had a hit in the 70's with that exact title.
Dec
17
revised Similar term to “visual” for audio?
added 4 characters in body
Dec
17
answered Similar term to “visual” for audio?
Dec
10
comment Nouns and pronouns
Even when referring to the singular country one could use the plural pronoun since a country is made up of a collection of individuals or a collection of leaders. Either singular or plural could be used. Just be consistent.
Dec
10
answered Is there a word or phrase for the time taken to become productive?
Dec
10
comment Is there a word or phrase for the time taken to become productive?
Is the word prepare appropriate? "The meeting was scheduled for 10am, but it took some people 5 minutes to prepare."
Dec
10
comment Is “originally first” a grammar error?
But then somebody realized that it was actually first invented many centuries prior to that? There is nothing grammatically incorrect about it and one could also argue that isn't redundant as well. Being redundant does not make a sentence ungrammatical. In poor style perhaps.
Dec
10
comment What is a cross-nibbed pen?
I thought these were called fountain pens.
Dec
10
comment “Not” or “not” in book title?
Not is definitely an important word. Have you ever written something down and mistakenly omitted the not? Oh, the regrets!
Dec
10
comment “Not” or “not” in book title?
Is there an example of a title with a, an or the as the last word and where it is still just an article? I can think of the band name The The, but that is no longer an article, is it? Or even to at the end?
Dec
10
comment Adjectives and nouns position: before or after?
Technically speaking, your first example is noun-preposition-noun and your second is adjective-noun. In English, the adjective usually precedes the noun as in chocolate cake, pretty face, rough voice, etc. Out of these examples you could say cake of chocolate but not face of pretty or voice of rough because those adjectives cannot double as nouns.
Dec
10
comment What's the word or phrase for “reading strategy/orientation”?
I would suggest refraining from selecting a correct answer within only a few hours. You might get better answers if it takes days.
Dec
10
answered What's the word or phrase for “reading strategy/orientation”?
Dec
10
comment including or included?
In the second case it would be an adjective. It describes yourself (a noun). But I'd agree with @medica's point. Many adjectives can resemble past tense verbs.
Dec
10
comment Word that means having eaten one's fill
This sounds more than full to me.
Nov
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
25
revised What's a common phrase that means “To put it simply though not 100% correctly”?
edited body
Nov
25
awarded  Yearling
Nov
25
answered What's a common phrase that means “To put it simply though not 100% correctly”?