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Aug
15
awarded  Guru
Aug
5
awarded  Yearling
Jul
28
comment midteens vs. mid-teens
@JakeRegier I think the question concerns the ambiguous nature of "mid". Is it an independent word or is it a combining form? Are the uses of "low", "mid" and "high" in these contexts parallel or sylleptic? I agree it would be sensible to decide one way or another and stick to it, but we are not necessarily privy to the internal stylebook at NYTimes for this kind of issue, so this might just be an error of inconsistency, or it might be an odd artifact of a strict rule in the stylebook which did not take this case into consideration.
Jul
27
comment midteens vs. mid-teens
@JakeRegier note the original article has abbreviated "mid-teens to high teens" using a suspended hyphen: "mid- to high teens". It's not "mid-to high teens". en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyphen#Suspended_hyphens
Jul
23
revised midteens vs. mid-teens
added 249 characters in body
Jul
23
answered midteens vs. mid-teens
Jul
20
awarded  Guru
Jul
14
comment Is there a rule for the correct pronunciation of words starting with “ex”?
FWIW, though M-W countenances final stress, I only have extant with initial stress.
Jul
14
answered etymology of predation and predating?
Jul
13
comment Is it acceptable to use Latin abbreviations in formal academic writings?
FWIW, the ampersand is just a stylized form of the Latin word 'et'
Jul
3
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
2
comment An old car in bad condition
@HotLicks it's kind of like a "No True Scotsman" approach to word usage... but here you go: "it wasn’t long before a jalopy of a bus trundled along and we hopped on" goo.gl/uXYjUI "I can drive home in my old jalopy just as well as in a Cadillac." goo.gl/atQVWE "it would be a waste of time to spruce up your 12-year-old jalopy and try to pass it off as new" goo.gl/u2EAgs "trade in that beat-up 1970's jalopy for something newer" goo.gl/nVhegn "Eventually an old jalopy shows up with [Neil] Young... at the wheel" goo.gl/CVO3mU
Jul
2
comment An old car in bad condition
@HotLicks I'm not sure what your point is, exactly? No one is disputing that the heyday of "jalopy"was the 1940s and 1950s. But there are many words that were once more popular than they are now, and you might call them "old-fashioned" but not "archaic"—consider 'clever', 'coeds', 'pompadour', 'whoopee' goo.gl/uyQrOh
Jul
1
comment An old car in bad condition
@phoog it definitely seems that "jalopy" experienced a heyday in the 1940s and 1950s, but the ngram shows pretty steady usage since usage flattened out in the mid-1960s—no evidence of a recent revival, but rather just a slang term that became established in the language for occasional use. Contrast with "swanky" and "groovy" two slang terms from the 1940s and 1970s, respectively, which are both experiencing a revival. goo.gl/9KELUt
Jul
1
comment An old car in bad condition
@HotLicks the word might have a bit of an old-fashioned flavor, but the fact is it remains in current use—it's not "archaic" and it's certainly not the case that no one is using it. Here it is being used in a video game review: goo.gl/9ns2xk Here it is being combined with the contemporary slang "for the win": goo.gl/1HNq5x It's pretty trivial to find examples of unmarked contemporary use of "jalopy". The authors don't mark the word specially with quotes or try to define it in context—it is assumed that readers will be familiar with the word.
Jul
1
comment It-cleft : “It was the Americas that Spaniards brought horses to.” is grammatically right?
Why would you think it is not correct?
Jul
1
comment An old car in bad condition
@HotLicks fwiw, Google Ngrams shows "jalopy" to be more popular than both "junker" and "clunker", and has shown pretty steady usage (no significant decline) since the 1960s. There was a big decline for 'jalopy' from the 1940s to the mid-1960s, but since then it has stayed in fairly constant usage. books.google.com/ngrams/…
Jul
1
comment Pronunciation of “err”
This answer would be improved by the explicit mention of orthoepic authority
Jul
1
revised Is “kinda” a word?
remove some more unnecessary, irrelevant, and inflammatory commentary
Jun
14
awarded  Nice Answer