41,798 reputation
7113195
bio website nohat.net
location San Jose, CA
age 34
visits member for 4 years
seen 42 mins ago

Full disclosure: I have a degree in linguistics, and so I am partial to descriptivist approaches to questions of usage. For me, assertions of correctness or incorrectness that are not reflective of actual usage are highly questionable.

I am a native speaker of American English.

My real name is David Friedland and my e-mail address is david.friedland@gmail.com. Feel free to contact me directly.


2h
comment When did it become correct to add an “s” to a singular possessive already ending in “‑s”?
@KonradViltersten looking at the date, it looks like it was during my two-week notice period after quitting my previous job and before starting my new one.
2d
awarded  Enlightened
2d
awarded  Nice Answer
2d
awarded  Good Answer
2d
comment Noun to describe a “typo-filled” letter
No offense, but if you can't be bothered to write complete sentences and fix typos in your e-mails, then you're being an e-mail boor. When I see a disclaimer like that at the bottom of messages, it's just a sign to me that my interlocutor is not just being rude accidentally, but that they've gone to the trouble of premeditating their boorishness. And if they've gone to trouble to use elegant language, curt, misspelled messages sting even more. My advice: never use an e-mail signature like that.
Aug
13
answered What is the origin of the suffix: 'ship'?
Aug
5
awarded  Yearling
Jul
31
comment Are focusing adverbs exceptions of adverb definitions?
@FumbleFingers but you're right--my example is misleading because single-word constituents can still be modified. I have removed that part of my answer.
Jul
31
revised Are focusing adverbs exceptions of adverb definitions?
deleted 95 characters in body
Jul
31
comment Are focusing adverbs exceptions of adverb definitions?
@FumbleFingers sure--where only is modifying the constituent "one other director"
Jul
31
answered Are focusing adverbs exceptions of adverb definitions?
Jul
29
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
28
answered Is “since-folded (TV network)” an accustomed English word?
Jul
20
comment Shouldn’t we use “lots of” with plural nouns and “a lot of” with singular ones?
What would make something 'correct' or 'incorrect'?
Jul
20
comment When is it appropriate to end a sentence in a preposition?
@user3847 Yeah, well, you know, that’s just, like, your opinion, man.
Jul
17
comment use of being in a sentence
This answer glosses over the original question's point of confusion, which is that the "willing" in "willing to come" is not the present participle of the verb "will", but a separate word "willing" which is an adjective meaning here "inclined or favorably disposed in mind". To be clear, "I am willing to come" is not the present progressive of "I will to come" (which is not grammatical in modern English), but something more like "I am inclined to come" or "I am happy to come".
Jul
17
comment Are there any words in English pronounced with /eː/ which aren't spelt with a following “r”?
FWIW, in standard American English, the vowel of "yeah" is /æ/, the same as in "cat".
Jul
16
comment How do you pronounce “lithe”?
Live ends in a /v/ sound, as in "have". Lithe ends in a /ð/ sound, like "breathe".
Jul
16
revised Should we avoid a “double passive”?
"to be build" -> "to be built"