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18/20 answers
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5h
comment Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun (“his” versus “her” versus “their”)?
@Jay ambiguity in a language is one of its core sources of expressive richness, not a measure of its defectiveness.
21h
awarded  Enlightened
1d
awarded  Nice Answer
2d
awarded  Guru
May
19
comment Why is “meta” pronounced differently to “beta”?
@DogLover the only "r" sound in "water" is at the end of the word. And the "t" sound isn't dropped—it's flapped
May
13
revised How Should Trademarks be Written?
fix minor typos
Apr
24
awarded  Sportsmanship
Apr
17
comment Can “Claptrap” be used to mean low quality?
possibly they meant "rattletrap" -- something (such as a car) that is old, noisy, and not in good condition merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rattletrap
Apr
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
1
awarded  Guru
Mar
13
comment Name of a foreigner from Earth?
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthling
Mar
10
comment Does this sound natural?
Why do you think the use of apostrophes is incorrect?
Mar
3
revised How can I reliably and accurately identify the passive voice in writing or speech?
thematically unify examples
Mar
3
comment How can I reliably and accurately identify the passive voice in writing or speech?
@F.E. OK, OK, I have added more details about the exceptions.
Mar
3
revised How can I reliably and accurately identify the passive voice in writing or speech?
add more notes about exceptions, with links to Wikipedia
Mar
2
revised How can I reliably and accurately identify the passive voice in writing or speech?
added 43 characters in body
Feb
16
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
15
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
29
comment To hyphen or not: cat person-turned-dog person vs. cat person turned dog person
(This is the correct answer, not the accepted one) Also, you only need to hyphenate compound adjectives when used attributively. Even if these were compound adjectives, you wouldn't hyphenate them as such when used predicatively. e.g. "These free-range chickens are hand fed." vs. "These hand-fed chickens are free range"