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18/20 answers
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Apr
30
awarded  Custodian
Apr
30
reviewed Close Differentiating between “written” and “writing”
Apr
30
reviewed Close Correct title for this paragraph?
Apr
30
reviewed Close “Have you washed it” vs “Did you wash it”?
Apr
30
reviewed Close What do you call someone who takes but doesn't want to give?
Apr
29
comment What's the difference between a gerund and a participle?
@LePressentiment I mean a participle-gerund (word ending in -ing)
Apr
29
comment What is the closest alternative to “rubbish” in American English?
@Dodecaphone are you sure it's being used as an adjective and not as an attributive noun? Do you have an example?
Apr
29
comment Is “Jew” gender-neutral?
@espertus you added the word "always". I never said "always"—in fact I clarify later in the answer when I say it is likely to cause offense. These are empirical facts about the word. I don't believe that any part of of my answer is factually incorrect or even inaccurate. Your claiming to be offended is a red herring—it does not make my answer wrong, just that you are offended by it.
Apr
29
comment Difference between an acronym and abbreviation?
@CharlesRoper I don't have any statistics, but a number of years ago I did some searches on Google books for "is an acronym" and sifted through pages and pages of results, looking at the string that preceded the match, and found that about 40% of results were strings that would be pronounced by naming the letters rather than "as a word". This indicated to me that a large percentage of users of this word don't make the distinction that some dictionaries seem so hung up on. FWIW, Merriam-Webster is not one of them: m-w.com/dictionary/acronym their definition includes FBI as an example
Apr
27
answered Plural of The Letter S
Feb
26
awarded  Guru
Feb
18
revised Difference between an acronym and abbreviation?
bolding the important bits
Feb
17
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
16
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
5
awarded  Populist
Jan
12
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
14
comment Can “Christmas” be used as an adjective?
To be fair, I think the use of "Christmas" in "Christmas colored stockings" is as an adverb, modifying the adjective "colored", not an adjective.
Nov
20
awarded  Good Answer