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Jun
30
comment Why does “impregnable” mean *cannot be impregnated*?
Actually the in in impregnate changed the original stem praegnare quite a bit. praegnare means 'to be pregnant', and impraegnare is 'to make pregnant'.
Jun
30
comment Possessive and plural of “Series”
I think that only works for proper names ending in S, e.g. James. It used to be the case that you should write "James'" and pronounce it "James". These days you would write and say "James's" and all of these are correct. But sheeps's is definitely incorrect, and you wouldn't pronounce it sheepses either. Unfortunately that does lead to ambiguity in some cases, so if it's not clear from context what you mean, I would change the sentence.
Apr
27
awarded  Good Question
Jan
20
awarded  Yearling
Oct
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
23
comment No one + plural verb
That's great, but can you point to any evidence to support your grammarian/linguist's opinion? For example, if you look up English verb tables (example 1, example 2), you will find only forms for you and we (let's...); the wikipedia article on the imperative mood makes no mention of a 3rd person. I only really have any strong experience with Latin and Spanish otherwise, which both also use subjunctives in this way.
Sep
21
comment No one + plural verb
In English, 'jussive' can only describe a category, its not a unique mood, and of course imperatives fall into this category. However, the first examples in his article are of non-imperative jussives which are subjunctives, including "Everybody listen" which is the same form as the OP's sentence. The only thing that comes close to a 3rd person imperative in English is a periphrastic construction using let
Sep
21
comment No one + plural verb
My first thought was the same, but looking around the internet, I don't see any agreement that a 3rd person imperative exists in English (can you?). You could just as easily say "Somebody at the front write your name on the board". Maybe it's safer to say it's a jussive? Check out this article by Nordquist.
Sep
20
answered No one + plural verb
May
27
comment Is there a word that means “nearly synonymous”?
I'm not sure about true synonymy myself, but English is full of words of different linguistic origins that essentially mean the same thing (kingly/regal, paternal/fatherly, etc.). I suspect that this word was coined by someone who does believe in true synonymy.
May
26
comment What do you call a person who always has what you need?
I would second go-to guy.
May
26
answered Is there a word that means “nearly synonymous”?
May
26
comment Describing how to value an item or thing
I think all three of these are equally good, but I think 'value' is the clearest choice in terms of second language readers (if that's even a consideration). Also, 'assess your assets' seems a bit clumsy, unless you want alliteration for effect.
May
3
comment Antonym of selfie
'Yousie' retains some of the Australian flavour of 'selfie' too!
May
3
comment Difference between the words of violent criticisms
I'm guessing you mean fulminate rather than culminate
May
2
comment Proper use of “what's”
+1 The first example here is definitely the most natural sounding, but it's a quoted question and should be punctuated as such.
May
1
answered Word meaning to interrogate in a “mild” manner?
May
1
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Apr
30
answered Different word other than “rude” for describing ellipsis usage
Apr
30
awarded  Custodian