1,406 reputation
1631
bio website angelfire.com/md3/…
location Maryland
age 56
visits member for 1 year, 6 months
seen Sep 10 at 20:14

I converted to Orthodox Judaism in 1980. My conversion story was originally published in the Baltimore Jewish Times and was reprinted in its entirety by About.com and in excerpt form by Rabbi Maurice Lamm in his book Becoming a Jew. I learned Daf Yomi for 10 years completing the entire 11th Cycle and getting half way through the 12th. I stopped shortly after being diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease and recognized I could not stay up for late night Daf classes nor keep up if I did not. For the 20th anniversary of my conversion, I decided to teach the last daf of Kesubos and contacted Art Scroll for help, as they had not yet published their translation of that daf. Rabbi Yehezkel Danziger surprised me by suggesting that I try translating the page for publication in order to make my celebration "more special." It took me 3 months to translate the main text and the Rashi, but I submitted my work and, after much editing, received an editorial credit in Volume III of Art Scroll's Kesuvos translation. I have been a frequent contributor to the About.com Judaism board and specialized in counter-missionary posts. My website, "A Primer: Why Jews Cannot Believe in Jesus" is designed as a quick introduction to major points I tend to make when dealing with missionaries. In my secular life, I am an attorney for the Federal Government.


Sep
10
revised Does the apostrophe in names of diseases drop when the disease name is part of a foundation name?
added 63 characters in body
Sep
10
comment Who were the 'pros from Dover'?
I remember the book well. M*A*S*H and M*A*S*H Goes to Maine were hillarious. They were written by a doctor named E. Richard Hornberger who went by the pen name of Richard Hooker (which he said described his golf game). Later sequels, which were less entertaining, were ghost written by William E. Butterworth III, writing there as Richard Hooker, but who is now better known as W.E.B. Griffin.
Sep
10
asked Does the apostrophe in names of diseases drop when the disease name is part of a foundation name?
Aug
26
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
12
revised Do gentiles use “appetizing” as a noun?
edited to restore desired tone.
Aug
12
comment Do gentiles use “appetizing” as a noun?
@JohnLawler Delis that only have a meat counter would be unlikely to keep bagels not because of dairy and meat concerns, but because bagels are not associated with deli.
Aug
12
comment Do gentiles use “appetizing” as a noun?
@JohnLawler I'm an orthodox Jew, and my wife was a kosher inspector for a rabbinic organization. Bagels are not considered dairy, nor may they be made with dairy ingredients and be given kosher certification (no bread can).
Aug
12
comment Do gentiles use “appetizing” as a noun?
@danbron you deleted some of the flavor (pun intended) I wanted in the question. I'll roll back some when I get to a PC - I'm limite with a hand-held.
Aug
12
asked Do gentiles use “appetizing” as a noun?
Jul
17
reviewed Reviewed Too serious to take seriously
Jul
17
asked Citation of internet webpages that have limited lifetimes
Jul
13
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
9
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
6
awarded  Famous Question
Jul
3
comment “Truth, Justice AND the American Way”?
@JohnLawler How would adding a comma avoid the negation? Wouldn't that instead reinforce the fact that they are equal terms that stand alone to the exclusion of the others? It seems to me that you want the comma to imply the phrase "which is...".
Jul
3
asked “Truth, Justice AND the American Way”?
Jul
2
answered Answering a question with another question when the answer is obviously 'Yes'
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
17
awarded  Constituent
Jun
17
awarded  Caucus