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Aug
11
accepted Person, People, Peoples, and other linguistically similar words
Aug
4
revised Person, People, Peoples, and other linguistically similar words
edited body
Aug
4
comment Person, People, Peoples, and other linguistically similar words
@tchrist. Ah. Thanks for the clarification. I edited the original post in response.
Aug
3
comment Person, People, Peoples, and other linguistically similar words
@tchrist I was under the impression that declension was the noun and adjective specific form of inflection. (Going by Merriam-Webster's definition, anyway.)
Aug
3
comment Person, People, Peoples, and other linguistically similar words
I'm going to second your comment, deadrat. Money is a collective noun that refers to dollars, yen, cents, pesos, and so on, all of which inflect differently.
Aug
2
comment Person, People, Peoples, and other linguistically similar words
That absolutely works. It's a strange one, given that the singular and plural are the same, but 'fish, fish, fishes' fits well.
Aug
2
comment Person, People, Peoples, and other linguistically similar words
I think member would be the singular there. Faculty seems like it's a modifier that would be optional in context. In addition, there's a slew of other options, such as team member, board member, or band member, all of which can be reworded as 'person in/on the X'.
Aug
2
asked Person, People, Peoples, and other linguistically similar words
May
10
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
4
awarded  Yearling
Nov
15
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
9
comment Antonym of 'Cascade'
Ascent comes to mind.
Mar
7
revised Is it necessary to begin a new paragraph after a person speaks?
added 1 characters in body
Mar
6
comment “have been working” vs. “have worked”
The only difference I see is that if someone were to insert a phrase such as 'on and off' into the sentence, #2 would be a more common phrasing.
Mar
5
comment Redneck and usage
@user36922: Did you try perusing Google Books? That's where I find most of my etymology and usage information.
Mar
5
comment Redneck and usage
@Lynn: Having spent a great deal of time living in the country, I've found that I can call virtually any of my neighbors a redneck without them minding. I, however, am certainly not a redneck, and everyone I live around knows it. I imagine that the difference is either one of perceived intent (as they know I mean no harm by the phrase) or inclusion by proxy.
Mar
5
comment Possessive Ambiguity: sharing a house
That's true in American English as well, though without context, the possessive should probably be used to assume ownership. (Even in your example, I'd argue that ownership is still being claimed, but at an emotional, rather than legal, level.) You bring up an interesting point.
Mar
5
revised Which pronoun should be used to refer back to actions?
improved formatting
Mar
5
comment Which pronoun should be used to refer back to actions?
I apologize. I'd forgotten that.
Mar
5
revised Possessive Ambiguity: sharing a house
Edited the title to better reflect the question. Still not perfect, but it's a bit better. Anyone want to make it even better?