147 reputation
27
bio website indianmage.com
location Mumbai, India
age 27
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Nov 7 '12 at 17:34
Newbie Professional Geek

Aug
15
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
10
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
7
comment Synonyms for “tête-à-tête”
Thanks Barrie. Interesting word ans suggestion, but I'm letting it pass for the negative connotation of fabricating lies to fill gaps in the memory.
Nov
7
comment Synonyms for “tête-à-tête”
Thanks Bill. Huddle isn't exactly the word I was looking for as I was looking for something between two people, but I like it, and might end up using it.
Nov
7
comment Synonyms for “tête-à-tête”
Thanks @Mottie, but I don't think either of them are a synonym to tete-a-tete as there's no secret talks.
Nov
7
comment Synonyms for “tête-à-tête”
Thanks @fumblefingers. I like heart-to-heart, but I think face-to-face fits tete-a-tete as a synonym better. Schmooze, as you say, has a negative connotation, at least for me.
Nov
7
comment Synonyms for “tête-à-tête”
Thanks @J.R. While I was looking for a single word in the non-hyphenated sense, you're right that this does fit the bill, and hence, accepting.
Nov
7
accepted Synonyms for “tête-à-tête”
Nov
7
comment Synonyms for “tête-à-tête”
Thanks @coleopterist for the edits. The online thesaurus did indeed have synonyms. As mentioned, however, I was looking for a single word synonym.
Nov
4
asked Synonyms for “tête-à-tête”
Nov
1
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
2
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
17
awarded  Supporter
Mar
17
accepted “In a call” versus “on a call”
Mar
17
comment “In a call” versus “on a call”
Good explanation, thanks.
Mar
17
comment “In a call” versus “on a call”
@Pierre, referring to phone (possibly, conference) calls. Edited it in.
Mar
17
awarded  Editor
Mar
17
revised “In a call” versus “on a call”
added 45 characters in body; added 26 characters in body
Mar
16
asked “In a call” versus “on a call”
Jan
20
comment Is the following usage of “matter-of-factly” correct?
Thanks Hellion, "As a matter of fact" meaning "actually" makes sense, and comparing it with the adverb form is where I was going wrong.