136 reputation
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location Buenos Aires, Argentina
age 35
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Dec 3 at 9:25

Jul
30
comment How can I spell out Pope Francis’s remark on gay priests, ‘Who am I to judge?’
He said "chi sono io per giudicare?" which means "who am I to judge?"
Sep
17
awarded  Commentator
Sep
17
comment Is it possible to use the verb “torture” in a figurative sense?
@brilliant. I think POW stands for prisoner of war.
Aug
28
awarded  Teacher
Aug
28
answered Contracting “Should not have”
Aug
28
comment Use of “should have” in conditional sentences
+1. The first case seems to cover the usage in the OP's question. The second, however, looks like a different syntax to me (should is in the conditional clause, not in the main one).
Jul
16
comment Why is the initial “ts” sound (e.g “tsunami”) pronounced as “s”?
As another side note, Old Spanish (castellano antiguo) did have that sound, though. And I think "plaza" was spelled "plaça".
Jul
2
comment “The object that is sent the message is called the target”
@FumbleFingers. As long as that's something up with which you will put ;)
Jul
2
comment “The object that is sent the message is called the target”
@FumbleFingers. Thanks for your comment. I understand what you mean about stylistic preferences. I like your better and best alternatives, although over the years I've somehow learnt to avoid constructs such as "to whom" because I've read and heard that they sound stilted (albeit perfectly fine from a grammatical standpoint).
Jul
2
comment “The object that is sent the message is called the target”
"The object the message is sent to is called the target." Would it be another way to put it? I have a feeling it sounds natural, but I'm not a native speaker.
Jun
6
comment How did English get the “What is your name?” construction?
@Kit. No problem. I didn't mention it in the previous comment, but you are of course right in that "How are you called?" / "¿Cómo te llamas?" is also proper and common Spanish. Unfortunately, I don't have much to add about the English construction, which is obviously the main issue of your question.
Jun
6
comment How did English get the “What is your name?” construction?
@Kit. As a native speaker of Spanish, I'd say that "¿Cuál es tu nombre?" is pretty common and by no means archaic or contrived (it traslates literally as "which is your name", so the structure is almost identical to its English counterpart).
May
27
comment Why do non-native English speakers get the present participle wrong?
I doubt you'll find a definite answer, but I think native language interference could be a factor. In Spanish, at least, you'd use an infinitive or a subordinate clause plus subjunctive in these examples, not a gerund / present participle. This is probably true for other romance languages as well.
Apr
22
comment Is there a rule about double negations that aren't meant as double negations (e.g. “We don't need no education”)?
Well, there's another line that seems to support your interpretation: "Teachers, leave them kids alone". Which, from a prescriptive point of view, is ungrammatical too.
Jan
19
awarded  Supporter