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I have sold science fiction, movie reviews, medical nonfiction, restaurant reviews, and screenplays. I edited and co-wrote a chapter on writing science fiction, published in a popular college textbook on fiction writing (The Graceful Lie, edited by Michael Petracca). I created and co-edited UNEARTH, a science fiction magazine devoted exclusively to discovering and publishing new writers, which launched many writing careers (name-drop: William Gibson). I'm a physician, film director, drummer, scuba diver, and golfer.


Jun
27
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
22
awarded  Yearling
Feb
13
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
24
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
4
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
5
comment Can I say “many of the United States”?
I surprised myself by responding mentally to this question with "Sure. Why not?" It didn't sound strange to me at all. And, really, I don't think it is incorrect. But, okay, I accept what seems to be the majority opinion as stated nicely by FF, and further suggest that another good way around the problem would be to use "many states in the U.S."
Oct
5
awarded  Convention
Oct
3
answered In farms or on farms?
Oct
3
revised Infinitive or gerund complement clause
repaired typo, spelling, and punctuation
Oct
2
comment word to describe a quote often attributed to but not verified to a person
@Jim I suppose, to be fair, I might also suggest allegedly, as in "Einstein allegedly said," and purportedly, and "It is attributed to Einstein," and "one of Einstein's dicta (or dictums) is" -- but none of these exactly fits the slot, n'est pas? I still think apocryphal is the target word.
Oct
1
comment word to describe a quote often attributed to but not verified to a person
@Jim No, it doesn't fit in the slot. But neither does aphorism. I was merely replacing the suggested word with the word I know he or she is actually seeking, given the state of his or her language skill. To fit something into the slot, however, we might suggest merely "said," and then the quote would be followed by the word "apocryphal" (sans quotation marks) placed in parentheses, thus: Einstein said, "Everybody..." (apocryphal). I believe this would be the generally accepted usage, although I have seen "Einstein apocryphally said." (I cringe at this, and do not recommend it.)
Sep
30
answered Words similar to 'either' and 'neither' for 3 items
Sep
30
answered word to describe a quote often attributed to but not verified to a person
Sep
28
revised What is the origin and scope of usage of the phrase “Voodoo That You Do So Well”?
deleted 1 characters in body
Sep
28
comment A word for “positive side effect”
When you already have a perfectly good word that works for your purpose, but you want more, you can use a thesaurus to come up with a huge number of possibilities. In print (Roget's Thesaurus being the most famous book of its kind), or online at thesaurus.com, you can find just about all the alternatives and synonyms you would ever want.
Sep
28
answered What is the origin and scope of usage of the phrase “Voodoo That You Do So Well”?
Sep
28
comment A GRE verbal question — I think the given answer is wrong
The answer key's description of what answer C says is a direct contradiction of what answer C actually says, however, no matter what misleading (and possibly mistaken, as Noah points out) locutions occur in the text. Only A is correct. B and C are not.
Sep
28
comment A GRE verbal question — I think the given answer is wrong
@Noah's point about the different word order is significant, because it does change the meaning. Was this intentional? Some textual matter here appears sloppy, but some I find intentionally vague to make it more challenging to answer. "No equivalent in the Western conceptualization" does not logically require "not believing in the concept," so B should not be right, yet again, the locutions are misleading, which allows Jim's interpretation. But if the West doesn't have it's own "conceptualization," that does not mean it does not believe in the concept which does exist in the East.
Sep
28
comment Which is preferable: “We are all” or “we all are”
@JohnLawler I agree enthusiastically with that comment, Professor, which is why I tried to include a handful of qualifiers in my last paragraph. For the sake of others reading these comments, I'll add that context, intention, vocal intonations (when the words are spoken, of course), and other factors greatly influence the eventual conveyed meaning in each case (or at least what one hopes was conveyed). :)