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May
19
comment Can you sort by random?
There are things in computing that are technically random. There are hardware modules which generate random bits based on random physical phenomena. Some aspects of the timing of physical events can be random.
May
11
comment Does mistaken mean mis-taken as misunderstood means mis-understood?
Language isn't always logical. Have you checked a dictionary for the definition? Or are you asking about the etymology of the word?
Apr
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
15
comment How do you denote written slang?
@Tushar Even if there were some notations that were unambiguous and served to indicate that a word was "misspelled" (but is it really misspelled?) on purpose, I'd still argue that such a notation would be useless in all but the most formal contexts.
Apr
15
revised How do you denote written slang?
added 120 characters in body
Apr
15
comment How do you denote written slang?
Oh, then I have to disagree. There are different uses of the *wanna notation. It's used in linguistics, for example, to mark sentences that are incorrect.
Apr
15
comment How do you denote written slang?
@Tushar From how I read the question, the OP wants to use slang, but just doesn't want it to reflect badly on him. There isn't really a way to do that. You either use a word, or you don't use it.
Apr
15
answered How do you denote written slang?
Mar
20
comment What do you call the source of a “said” quote?
@Kris ngrams shows significant usage for "author of the quote". Please remember that dictionaries don't make language.
Mar
20
awarded  Curious
Mar
18
comment “The answer[s] to big problems…” - plural or singular?
Grammatically they are both valid. Semantically the singular makes no sense. And logically they are both wrong.
Feb
23
comment Coney and rabbit: what’s the difference?
"... and which Sam later cooks up in a stew" - here I had to re-read it as I didn't recall Sam cooking Beorn.
Feb
21
comment “Facade” vs. “façade”
@paul while I'm sure the accent's absence from typical US English keyboards doesn't help the situation, I think it's also fair to say that most English speakers just don't use accents or other diacritics at all on any words. There are fewer and fewer cases where you could argue that a diacritic is allowed, let alone required. Anglicized words usually drop them and most native speakers are unsure of how to use them. That is the reason why the keyboard doesn't make it easy to write them: they aren't really part of standard English.
Feb
20
revised How to succinctly and clearly connote the reverse of a statement
Added the quote and clear link to the context
Feb
13
answered Is the misuse of “literally” an example of a malapropism?
Feb
13
comment Is the misuse of “literally” an example of a malapropism?
It's hardly a neologism. It's attested over a century ago.
Feb
13
comment Is the misuse of “literally” an example of a malapropism?
It's just hyperbole. But classifying words into categories is fraught with being primarily-opinion-based.
Feb
9
revised What word starts with “pro”, ends with “ive”, and means generally-accepted or -expected
edited tags
Feb
2
comment Uniqueness vs. Unicity
@ChrisSunami I'm not sure what you don't understand here. tchrist says that the words are attested (and thus valid descriptively and prescriptively). Then he recommends that you don't use them because they are very rare and many people will take exception to your use of them. Then he suggests a usage (poetry) where they will actually fit very well and nobody could possibly object. What's confusing or unclear here?
Jan
28
comment Is “layman” an offensive term?
This doesn't address whether or not the word has derogatory or offensive connotations.