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comment Does the “she was found in violation of…” <-> “she was violated” equivalence have a name?
@HotLicks You're focusing too much on the example and not enough on the phenomenon, I think.
Apr
27
reviewed Reject What non-religious expressions can I use instead of “Thank God”?
Apr
27
reviewed Approve What non-religious expressions can I use instead of “Thank God”?
Apr
27
comment Gender neutral version of housewife
a housekeeper is a servant or employee. If someone said they were a housekeeper I'd assume it meant they went to someone else's house to "keep" it, not their own house.
Apr
19
comment An adjective for your place of origin when it differs from your place of birth ? (like in Switzerland)
@Pierrick Well, my answer did address your question: there is no concept as the official place where your family is from. Thus, there is no word for it.
Apr
19
comment An adjective for your place of origin when it differs from your place of birth ? (like in Switzerland)
@Michael Not just one spot: how long must you be removed from that spot before it is no longer your origin? Those British descended from the Normans, do they say they are from Normandy? etc.
Apr
19
reviewed Approve An adjective for your place of origin when it differs from your place of birth ? (like in Switzerland)
Apr
19
answered An adjective for your place of origin when it differs from your place of birth ? (like in Switzerland)
Apr
13
comment Why has Southern US English all but abandoned adverb forms?
@klaar Just because there may be a better word choice doesn't make every other word choice wrong. Just because adding a rule to language allows new distinctions to be made doesn't mean that the rule is beneficial overall. Languages are not based on reasoned rules. As other answers have pointed out, good as an adverb has a long history. Is it always objectively better to use well? I doubt it.
Apr
6
comment Can this subject be implied or does it need to be explicit?
If the first variant is correct, what does it mean? What is being fostered?
Apr
6
revised What do we call this type of person?
deleted 40 characters in body
Apr
6
awarded  grammar
Apr
5
comment Can this subject be implied or does it need to be explicit?
@BillJ since you posted your answer as a comment before I posted this, if you post an answer I will erase mine if you want.
Apr
5
answered Can this subject be implied or does it need to be explicit?
Apr
5
comment Can this subject be implied or does it need to be explicit?
@BillJ you should make an answer so you can be upvoted accordingly.
Apr
4
comment What is it called when two people refuse to talk to each other?
"The silent treatment" was the first thing that came to my mind as well. The silent treatment is something one person does to another. There is nothing that limits it to being unidirectional. Consider the word "punch". A punch has a puncher and a punchee. That doesn't stop two people from punching each other. Why would the silent treatment be any different?
Mar
29
comment What is implied in this sentence?
@Lambie Did you miss the first comment, which has the full quote? It seems most likely to me that someone copied out the quote improperly. If there is evidence that this sentence is, actually, meant to be a proper sentence and not a mistaken quote, I think we should be shown that evidence before we consider it any further. This site could easily get totally bogged-down if we tried to consider every single mistake as a valid sentence.
Mar
29
comment What is implied in this sentence?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about a transcription error.
Mar
23
comment Expletive or exclamation meaning “exactly” or “precisely”
This question was closed as POB but I think there is an interesting linguistic question about why _exact-fucking-ly doesn't work. My guess is that you can only infix fucking after an unstressed syllable. Thus, I'd suggest ex-fucking-actly.
Mar
8
comment Is “most” equivalent to “a majority of”?
@Pacerier as always. There are guidelines, trends, common usages, but you can't be 100% sure in all cases.