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16h
comment What word can suitably replace “Chronicles” in “Chronicles of Narnia”?
Have you tried a thesaurus?
19h
comment Colloquial definitions of 'nice', possible alternatives?
You could try to find a better label for the kind of person you wish to describe, but it's probable that there isn't one that encapsulates all the meanings you've piled together.
Jul
23
comment When does an aunt’s partner or husband become an uncle?
@AaronMcDaid language isn't contractual. If a couple is, for all practical reasons, living as if they are married, then they are married. In fact there are many legal jurisdictions that treat them as legally married. So they can use the aunt/uncle words.
Jul
21
comment This is right. Or that is right?
There's more than one way to say it. They're both acceptable.
Jul
21
comment Is 'I f*cked the dog' an actual idiom and are there alternatives
As a Canadian living in Ontario I've never heard this expression.
Jul
21
comment Can you say I don't and can't do anything
@Robusto I think the information expressed by "I don't do chores" vs "I don't have to do chores" is actually quite different. The former says that you don't do it, but doesn't say why, the latter says you aren't required to do it, but doesn't say if you do it or not. Thus, I'd say that you shouldn't just switch one sentence for another.
Jul
16
revised Seeking single word denoting a word pair in which one cannot exist without the other
Fixed formatting.
Jul
16
comment Seeking single word denoting a word pair in which one cannot exist without the other
prose: written or spoken language in its ordinary form, without metrical structure.
Jul
15
comment Seeking single word denoting a word pair in which one cannot exist without the other
@vladkornea we don't need the word "poetry" to have poetry and thus the concept of prose. I already gave an example of a word whose opposite has no word. We don't have single words for all concepts and we don't have words for the "opposite" of all concepts. Why would we? What's the word for things that aren't portable?
Jul
15
comment Seeking single word denoting a word pair in which one cannot exist without the other
@vladkornea words exist because we create them. Concepts can exist independently of the labels we assign them. You don't need the word "outside" to create the word "inside". Otherwise how would you even create "outside" to go with "inside"? "Prose" exists whether or not we have poetry. The label for it is only useful if we have done reason to distinguish prose from non-prose, but we don't need the word "poetry" for that.
Jul
15
comment Seeking single word denoting a word pair in which one cannot exist without the other
@alok there are no words which cannot exist without an antonym. It's a false premise.
Jul
15
comment Seeking single word denoting a word pair in which one cannot exist without the other
Lots of words exist without their corresponding opposite. Consider portable: easily moved or carried. It doesn't have a ready, common antonym. There is no rule that a word needs to have an opposite to exist. A language could easily have "inside" and "not inside".
Jul
10
comment Why did people sound differently when addressing the public in the early 1900s?
You contradict yourself when you say that people didn't used to speak more clearly, but now they speak using low, muddled speech. Also, when comparing presidential speeches to normal speech, it might be instructive to look at recent examples. Eisenhower's delivery reminds me a little of Obama's, for example, and doesn't sound markedly different. The newscaster, by contrast, is definitely using a distinct newscaster style, which I would argue is not what Eisenhower was doing at all.
Jun
24
comment xx is subject to hotel’s confirmation
Nouns can be used as adjectives in English. "Hotel confirmation" is just a noun phrase where hotel modifies confirmation. What kind of confirmation? The kind from, or about, or related to a hotel.
Jun
24
reviewed Looks OK Framing a question whose answer is an ordinal number
Jun
24
reviewed No Action Needed Can you use “crime scene” for a suicide?
Jun
24
reviewed Reopen Is my usage of the term “context” and its related verbs in this context meaningful?
Jun
24
reviewed Leave Closed “Have you ever been to … when …” versus “Did you ever go to … when … ?”
Jun
24
reviewed Leave Closed What kind of phrase/clause is “as far as I know”?
Jun
24
reviewed Reopen Is there a verb that means “to make poor”?