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Feb
13
awarded  Yearling
Dec
31
revised Idiom or word for a very crowded place
added 61 characters in body
Dec
31
comment Idiom or word for a very crowded place
In British English it's definitely rammed [full], not crammed [full]. The metaphor here is ramming a cannon with shot before firing.
Dec
13
comment Why doesn't blood sound like \ˈblüd\?
From ELL's perspective, the simple answer is "the pronunciation of English words isn't particularly related to how they are spelled". Consequently I think this would be a better fit on ELU where they can discuss the etymology of the word.
Dec
3
comment What is the rule for adjective order?
@TheEnglishChicken: For some reason, although "large", "tiny", "small" and many other size adjectives seem to follow the rule order for size as discussed in this question, "big" and "huge" don't, e.g. "big bad wolf", "big beautiful women", "huge beautiful sculpture" etc. tend not to.
Nov
27
comment Why does “don't have a cow” mean “chill out” or “calm down” in American English?
I'm moving this to ELU because etymology question are off-topic on ELL.
Nov
26
comment A word meaning “to set equal to one” in a mathematical application?
That said, in mathematics "setting something" other than a variable is quite rare, since mathematics is stateless. Instead, it would be more common to just say "Let x be 1".
Nov
26
comment A word meaning “to set equal to one” in a mathematical application?
How about unitize? Unionize is not a good choice because it brings to mind mathematical unions (i.e. from Set Theory), which could possibly lead to confusion.
Nov
24
comment President of [Country][Name] vs President [Name] of [Country]
@ArmenԾիրունյան: It doesn't sound particularly odd. If it sounded odd, I suspect the Grauniad would have chosen a different phrasing for it.
Nov
24
comment President of [Country][Name] vs President [Name] of [Country]
Ah. I see. His father has the title "Prince of Wales" (i.e. it is not Prince Charles of Wales); As a British prince he uses the name of the area over which his father holds title; i.e., Wales, as a territorial suffix in lieu of surname.
Nov
24
comment President of [Country][Name] vs President [Name] of [Country]
Well for a start, "Prince Harry of Wales" is completely wrong. He is Prince Harry, Prince of Wales. The Prince of Wales is a title, not a description. He is of the United Kingdom.
Nov
13
comment A comical/informal synonym for “big”/“large” but not inappropriate
ginormous or humongous come to mind.
Sep
30
comment bother and intrude question
@bib: In its current form, this question isn't suitable for ELL because it does not contain enough research.
Sep
30
comment Polite alternative to the term “bitch” when referring to a female dog
"Kid", when used to describe children, is generally not pejorative though. On the other hand, "bitch", when referring to women, is almost always grossly offensive.
Sep
25
comment Can I use the term 'America' to signify just the United States?
If you are writing anything legal, just say "The United States of America" instead of using a potentially ambiguous term.
Sep
24
revised What role does the phrase “the way” perform in this sentence?
More meaningful title
Sep
24
suggested suggested edit on What role does the phrase “the way” perform in this sentence?
Sep
24
comment “Moon's Land ” or “Land of Moon”?
Your statement "You're personifying the moon; it can not possess anything" doesn't make any sense. Look at moon's orbit / orbit of the moon on Ngrams for instance: books.google.com/ngrams/…. Also moon's shadow / shadow of the moon
Sep
20
comment “Whip” in British politics
@tchrist: Not in the UK. You elect an MP by putting an X next to their name at a general election, not the name of the party. They may stand for a party, but they are not required to. In the UK MPs can resign from a party at any time for any reason or even "cross the floor" and change party entirely without forcing a by-election in their constituency. (see also: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…)
Sep
20
revised “Whip” in British politics
added 488 characters in body