1,170 reputation
38
bio website calvert.ch
location Switzerland
age 58
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Jun 9 at 20:44

Wrote my first program in 1973, haven't stopped since.


Jun
9
awarded  Caucus
May
25
comment Are these kinds of sentences considered proper English?
english.stackexchange was created to help people with their English yet its contributors seem largely to be either A/ people whose mother tongue isn't English, but insist that 'their English' is correct, or B/ everybody-is-right-let-it-all-hang-out liberals who classify ebonics as English because it uses English words. I find this a little sad and it was the reason I stopped contributing a couple of year's back. This exchange has convinced me that replying to an old post was indeed a mistake, that I won't repeat.
May
25
comment Are these kinds of sentences considered proper English?
If I read you correctly, because "we was waiting.." is comprehensible, it is grammatically correct. We disagree and if that makes me a grammar ayatollah in your eyes, fine. My grandfather was from County Down, a stone's-throw from Belfast; were he to have said "the eggs is cracked" I would have attributed it to lack of education.
May
24
comment Interviewer grinding me down
To me, "I had to go through a lot of grinding in the interview" means that the interview took place in a butcher's shop, where you had to grind a lot of meat. I would say "I went through a grinding interview", because it was the interview that was grinding, not the grinding that took place. Adding 'down' makes things clearer (the grinding was debasing in some way), but it seems clumsy. Just an opinion, please don't flame me for it.
May
24
comment Which nouns should include an article after “go to [noun]” in AmE and BE?
"But even in America, people 'go to jail'" but they don't pass 'Go' and don't collect £200 >;-)
May
24
comment are astronomy and astrology apt names for their concepts?
Astonomy is indeed a science. Astrology, like numerology, is for the intellectually-challenged >;-)
May
24
answered Starts with N ends in O… means Yes
May
24
comment Are these kinds of sentences considered proper English?
@McGurk "all of these sentences are grammatical" is a meaningless tautology; every sentence that isn't nonsense contains some sort of grammar. The correct phrase is "all those sentences are grammatically correct". That statement is false; "we was waiting for the bloke" is grammatically incorrect in English. There is no fallacy, when Fred says "we was waiting for the bloke", he does so knowing that it is incorrect, but the 'in' way to speak. Oh, and given the ghastly English you write, spare me the 'my friend', we ain't, thanks.
May
9
awarded  Nice Answer
May
6
comment Is there a male equivalent of 'bitch'?
Dog >;-). But you're probably looking for something like bastard (at least for Brits)
Jan
17
awarded  Yearling
Jan
17
awarded  Yearling
Jan
17
awarded  Yearling
Nov
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
31
comment What's a word that can be used when something, such as a document, is purposely bland?
@shreevatsar It would appear that I haven't understood the objectives of english.so.com. I initially perceived it as a place where people could ask about the finer points of English and get answers from experienced speakers. Sadly, I have seen almost as much quibbling and hair-splitting as useful content, so I'll leave you to your squabbling and move back to SO, where the tone and attitude is more conducive to teaching and learning.
Jan
31
comment What's a word that can be used when something, such as a document, is purposely bland?
@shreevatsar Perhaps you might like to make a better suggestion instead of picking holes in others'? 1. The OP is probably wise enough to make his own choice. 2. You're not adding any value to the thread.
Jan
31
comment What's a word that can be used when something, such as a document, is purposely bland?
@potatos and again according to Cambridge: vacuous adjective /ˈvæk.ju.əs/ formal not expressing or showing intelligent thought or purpose. It could be that we are differing according to American/British usage. Or some completely different culture, 'milquetoast' is unknown to Cambridge and dictionary.co.uk, I don't have my OED to hand.
Jan
31
comment What's a word that can be used when something, such as a document, is purposely bland?
@potatos I was referring to the sense according to dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/turgid_1 : turgid adjective ( TOO SERIOUS ) /ˈtɜː.dʒɪd//ˈtɝː-/ formal (of speech, writing, style, etc.) too serious about its subject matter; boring.
Jan
31
answered What's a word that can be used when something, such as a document, is purposely bland?
Jan
27
comment What is the correct usage of “vis-à-vis”?
@shreevatsar Good, pertinent observation, thanks, I've edited as you suggested