1,114 reputation
36
bio website calvert.ch
location Switzerland
age 58
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Apr 9 at 14:43

Wrote my first program in 1973, haven't stopped since.


Jan
17
awarded  Yearling
Jan
17
awarded  Yearling
Jan
17
awarded  Yearling
Nov
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
31
comment What's a word that can be used when something, such as a document, is purposely bland?
@shreevatsar It would appear that I haven't understood the objectives of english.so.com. I initially perceived it as a place where people could ask about the finer points of English and get answers from experienced speakers. Sadly, I have seen almost as much quibbling and hair-splitting as useful content, so I'll leave you to your squabbling and move back to SO, where the tone and attitude is more conducive to teaching and learning.
Jan
31
comment What's a word that can be used when something, such as a document, is purposely bland?
@shreevatsar Perhaps you might like to make a better suggestion instead of picking holes in others'? 1. The OP is probably wise enough to make his own choice. 2. You're not adding any value to the thread.
Jan
31
comment What's a word that can be used when something, such as a document, is purposely bland?
@potatos and again according to Cambridge: vacuous adjective /ˈvæk.ju.əs/ formal not expressing or showing intelligent thought or purpose. It could be that we are differing according to American/British usage. Or some completely different culture, 'milquetoast' is unknown to Cambridge and dictionary.co.uk, I don't have my OED to hand.
Jan
31
comment What's a word that can be used when something, such as a document, is purposely bland?
@potatos I was referring to the sense according to dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/turgid_1 : turgid adjective ( TOO SERIOUS ) /ˈtɜː.dʒɪd//ˈtɝː-/ formal (of speech, writing, style, etc.) too serious about its subject matter; boring.
Jan
31
answered What's a word that can be used when something, such as a document, is purposely bland?
Jan
27
comment What is the correct usage of “vis-à-vis”?
@shreevatsar Good, pertinent observation, thanks, I've edited as you suggested
Jan
27
revised What is the correct usage of “vis-à-vis”?
added 200 characters in body; deleted 9 characters in body
Jan
26
comment What is the correct usage of “vis-à-vis”?
Dear @colin, Oh dear. I get downvoted for answers with insufficient explanation. Then I get downvoted because someone didn't read the OP's question properly. Then I get told it's a bit over-detailed. There's really no pleasing some people. None of us are perfect, but we're all genuinely trying to help others, for free. With the greatest of respect, could I suggest that you, and others in your vein, ease up on the criticism and hair-splitting? Thank you kindly smiles politely
Jan
26
awarded  Editor
Jan
26
comment How do I report speech containing “must not”?
@kiamlaluno indeed, thank you for spotting that. Corrected
Jan
26
revised How do I report speech containing “must not”?
edited body
Jan
26
comment What is the correct usage of “vis-à-vis”?
@colin If your read the OP's question carefully, you will see that he also asked "what are its origins?". Whence my answer.
Jan
26
comment “Should” versus “would”
@elendil Indeed, but I'm OLD >;-)
Jan
26
comment “Should” versus “would”
@elendil agree usually, but I was thinking of the construction "I said I should be late (you know what Anna's like, she always got some last-minute thing to solve)" = I foresee that Anna will delay my leaving a preceding engagement.
Jan
26
comment “used word” or “word used”?
"The used word is wrong" doesn't sound quite right; perhaps because of the ambiguity between the meanings 'the word that was used' and 'the word worn out from over-use'
Jan
26
answered “Should” versus “would”