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Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Feb
11
awarded  Yearling
Feb
26
comment How can you distinguish between different meanings of the verb “to know” in English?
@terdon: I'm not sure what you're trying to say with all the dashes and square brackets. Anyway, as far as Spanish goes, conocer is more of a familiarity whereas saber is for facts and information. Knowledge would would usually be conocimientos, and knowing could go either way. Probably, yes, my answer is "tainted" with Spanish, but the OP hasn't actually specified which language pair the question is about, so it could be relevant.
Feb
22
awarded  Quorum
Feb
21
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Feb
21
comment A word or phrase for “temporarily not working”
It is a much better question for ELL, but that's in beta and arguably the question fits within the scope of the English site for being about word usage. At the same time, it is an awfully basic question.
Feb
20
comment What is the proper characterization of a US military officer in popular press?
Do you know the title of the officer? Captain John Smith, a Marine Corps reservist... might work for the body of a news article. As for the headline, which is more important, the fact that he's in the reserves or that he is an officer? What does being commissioned for life have to do with the premise?
Feb
20
comment A word or phrase for “temporarily not working”
Whether it's in speaking with coworkers or to others outside of the workplace, off works in either case, and it establishes a way to provide further information without committing to it. This answer also provides a common and concise context for the word off.
Feb
20
answered General rules for identifying conditional sentences?
Feb
20
comment A word or phrase for “temporarily not working”
Yes, or have the morning/day/week off. Off works nicely. You could even say ____ is off until Tuesday. Off is very versatile and can be a good introduction to any further information (or not).
Feb
20
comment Is there a name for spelling differences in words like _grey/gray_, _color/colour_, etc.?
While there is some regional variation going on when it comes to what we call these things, regional works much better with spelling variants than it does with alternate or alternative. That said, alternate is more common than alternative when placed immediately before the noun (without the word regional). books.google.com/ngrams/…
Feb
20
revised Under what circumstances is the construction “whose each” grammatical?
expanded on question of additional context for example phrase
Feb
20
revised Under what circumstances is the construction “whose each” grammatical?
added *in which each* suggestion
Feb
20
comment Under what circumstances is the construction “whose each” grammatical?
I'll have to make another edit. It looks like the issue with each in place of every might have more to do with them being different types of quantifiers: jstor.org/discover/10.2307/4177586 (Jstor preview of On Post-Determiner Quantifiers by Guy Carden. See also: homepages.uwp.edu/canary/grammar_text/29-det-misc.html and flesl.net/Grammar/Grammar_Glossary/determiner.php (excercises/examples w/ explanations, much more basic).
Feb
19
comment A word or phrase for “temporarily not working”
At universities, for an entire semester or more, sure. Otherwise, a sabbatical would be a leave of absence and the connotation would probably be longer than the time frame implied in the question.
Feb
19
answered to look into to find vs to look up?
Feb
19
suggested suggested edit on What's the word for a word that suddenly becomes famous?
Feb
19
revised A word or phrase for “temporarily not working”
fixed grammar/usage
Feb
19
suggested suggested edit on A word or phrase for “temporarily not working”
Feb
19
comment A word or phrase for “temporarily not working”
Who is the audience or what is the situation? It kinda depends on whether you're writing HR documentation, setting an auto-reply email or talking on the phone at work to an unknown party.