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3918
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location London, United Kingdom
age 33
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen 2 days ago

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Aug
13
answered “Her whole family IS/ARE biologists”?
Aug
3
awarded  Curious
Aug
2
asked Adjective of proper noun containing “and”
Jun
25
comment Why Côte d’Ivoire ⇒ Ivory Coast but Costa Rica ⇏ Rich Coast?
That might explain it for North America, but my motivation was actually listening to the British TV presenters talking about the World Cup.
Jun
25
asked Why Côte d’Ivoire ⇒ Ivory Coast but Costa Rica ⇏ Rich Coast?
Jun
18
answered Word for “Approximately Optimize”?
Jun
17
awarded  Caucus
Jun
1
awarded  Good Question
Apr
2
awarded  Custodian
Apr
2
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Did English ever have a formal version of “you”?
Feb
21
awarded  Famous Question
Feb
14
comment Did English ever have a formal version of “you”?
I'm not saying you're using it wrong, just that most people would consider it unnecessary in modern usage. Certainly with something in transition would make some people think it was needed in cases where others didn't. Or maybe it's making a comeback, I don't know. I can say that in context such as politics (there was a voter meeting I went to recently), probably a generation ago you'd have expected "de", but now you won't be corrected if you don't. Same goes for most contexts. Along with that you tend not to have a conversation about being "dus", which I've had several times down here.
Feb
11
comment Did English ever have a formal version of “you”?
And I'm only 2 years older than you. Just like you, I use it when I think someone wants to hear it. I think someone wants to hear it because they're of an older generation. How many days out of the last 7 have you heard it in a non-ceremonial context? How many interviews do you see it in? There was even a blooper clip last year of an interviewer who forgot to use it when addressing Prince Joachim. You wouldn't forget that if it was common.
Feb
11
awarded  Commentator
Feb
11
comment Did English ever have a formal version of “you”?
@JanusBahsJacquet I didn't make the Chinese addition. As I mentioned, if you're not retired you won't use it, and and nobody will use it when addressing you. Unless you happen to think someone is particularly old and wants it used. Contrast this with modern German, where it's not a marker of being old.
Jan
17
awarded  Yearling
Jan
6
comment Did English ever have a formal version of “you”?
I lived in Denmark for my first two decades, and nobody ever says it to anyone, except the royal family. Waiters & hotel staff don't use it, kids don't use it to address teachers, journalists don't use it in interviews, and people hoping to get your business don't use it. It's very, very uncommon among people who aren't retired. It might be good if they did; there's something about the German usage that I think is positive, but that's another discussion.
Sep
24
awarded  Nice Question
Sep
8
awarded  Favorite Question
Feb
15
awarded  Notable Question