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seen Mar 25 at 3:11

Jul
7
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
22
awarded  Necromancer
Mar
5
comment What is a “Victorian audience”?
-1 The answer lacks evidence or sources.
Mar
5
comment Usage of A/An dependent on preferential pronunciation?
let us continue this discussion in chat
Mar
5
comment Usage of A/An dependent on preferential pronunciation?
@JohnP - The post you have offered as reference clearly says that SQL, and not "sequel" is the standard pronunciation: 'The original SQL standard declared that the official pronunciation for SQL is "es queue el". Then how appropriate is it for you to say that "sequel" is perfectly acceptable in the programming world? The word world needs to be used carefully in contexts like this because it goes to include not only your circles but also everyone else's
Mar
5
comment Usage of A/An dependent on preferential pronunciation?
@JohnP - Obviously, you have created such interest in me. You are so knowledgeable. But let's address the second part of your comment: Is there a source to support your claim that it's 'perfectly acceptable' to say "sequel" in the programming world? I have spent enough time with some software engineers and whenever they talked about SQL, they called it SQL and not "sequel". Perhaps you should say it's 'perfectly acceptable' in your programming circles.
Mar
5
awarded  Critic
Mar
5
comment Usage of A/An dependent on preferential pronunciation?
I don't think this has anything to do with preferential pronunciation. The question of preferential pronunciation arises when the same word has more than one accepted pronunciation such as either. SQL, however, is an abbreviation and is not usually pronounced as an acronym since it has no vowel sounds in it to make it sound like a word. Where I live, I have never heard anyone pronouncing it as "sequel". I am not sure if it is even acceptable to pronounce it as "sequel".
Mar
5
comment Antonym for atmosphere?
This question is not clear and rightly closed. I feel that there are certain words that do not have an antonym. What's the antonym of coffee? Besides, it depends on the context. The antonym of right can be both 'wrong' and 'left' depending on the context.
Feb
22
accepted Dreams come true or they are fulfilled. What about 'hopes'?
Feb
21
asked Dreams come true or they are fulfilled. What about 'hopes'?
Feb
9
comment Can this statement be called a paradox?
Your answer is a good one. But I am more satisfied with the suggestion of 'irony'.
Feb
9
accepted Can this statement be called a paradox?
Feb
9
asked Can this statement be called a paradox?
Jan
20
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
13
comment Are modal verbs finite or non-finite?
@StoneyB Interesting. Bored can be a past participle adjective if it is modifying Barbara. And typing can be a present participle adverb if it is modifying the verb spent.
Jan
13
comment Are modal verbs finite or non-finite?
Request a clarification about present participles being non-finite. The word typing in "she is typing a letter" is a present participle and a non-finite verb whereas in "a good typing speed" it is a present participle functioning merely as an adjective and hence there is no question of it being finite or non-finite since only verbs can be finite or non-finite and not the adjectives. Is that correct?
Aug
5
comment Are prefixes, as bound morphemes, always separable from their root words?
Would it be completely wrong to say that –pro in words such as promote and progress is not really a prefix but instead an integral part of the word structure. There has to be a technical distinction between words like these where the root term cannot function on its own without the prefix and words where it can (ex: promotion, prolong etc.)
Aug
4
comment Are prefixes, as bound morphemes, always separable from their root words?
Interesting. So, how does one explain the case of 'promote'? Should we just say –pro is the prefix and 'mote' is the root word without any meaning of its own? In that case, the prefix seems to carry more meaning than the root term it is to supplement.