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  • 67 votes cast
Jun
27
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
26
comment Does one “shave” or “shear” a dog?
@Edwin: Again, I would suggest putting answers in answer boxes.
Jun
26
comment Does one “shave” or “shear” a dog?
Interesting. One animal that "shaving" applies to is yaks.
Jun
26
comment Does one “shave” or “shear” a dog?
@TimRomano: If you have an answer, please use the answer box.
Jun
26
comment Does one “shave” or “shear” a dog?
@Kris: I don't think I worded the question to imply that only one is correct. Either "shaved", "shorn" and "clipped" are all correct, or only the latter two.
Jun
26
revised Does one “shave” or “shear” a dog?
deleted 2 characters in body
Jun
26
asked Does one “shave” or “shear” a dog?
Jun
15
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
8
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
2
suggested rejected edit on White Noise: Why White?
Jan
17
awarded  Yearling
Dec
26
comment Is asking for the “proper” use of the word “chemical” a case of linguistic prescriptivism?
There's a linguistics Stack Exchange? I am learning more and more.
Dec
26
comment Is asking for the “proper” use of the word “chemical” a case of linguistic prescriptivism?
@PeterShor: Uh, an apple is not a chemical. It is made of a mixture of chemicals. Saying an apple does not contain chemicals just because they were never purified is an unconventional usage of the term. We are definitely off-topic now.
Dec
26
comment Is asking for the “proper” use of the word “chemical” a case of linguistic prescriptivism?
@AlanMunn: You are a linguist? Oh! looks embarrassed I should have probably just taken your word for it.
Dec
26
comment Is asking for the “proper” use of the word “chemical” a case of linguistic prescriptivism?
@Peter: We are getting off topic here, but chemical (as a noun) is short for chemical substance. Wikipedia draws a definition from the Compendium of Chemical Terminology: "In chemistry, a chemical substance is a form of matter that has constant chemical composition and characteristic properties. It cannot be separated into components by physical separation methods, i.e. without breaking chemical bonds. It can be solid, liquid, gas, or plasma." It is NOT the same as "molecule" (e.g. metals are chemicals, but not made of molecules).
Dec
26
comment Is asking for the “proper” use of the word “chemical” a case of linguistic prescriptivism?
@Edwin: I agree that I am looking for clarity on the meaning of "prescriptivist", and so I am asking here to hear from the experts. While scientists do argue, they don't argue much about the definition of "chemical" or "chemical substance"; they have reached a broad consensus; I am hoping the linguists have too for "prescriptivist".
Dec
26
comment Is asking for the “proper” use of the word “chemical” a case of linguistic prescriptivism?
@Edwin: Your first couple of sentences take us on a wild goose chase. That is not the problematical usage of "chemical". The noun form indicating artificial additive is the controversial one.
Dec
26
asked Is asking for the “proper” use of the word “chemical” a case of linguistic prescriptivism?
Dec
14
comment “What ever happened to” versus “Whatever happened to”?
2500 views and I am the only upvoter for this excellent answer? Please give this answer some upvote love!
Dec
14
awarded  Notable Question