268 reputation
28
bio website alexch.github.com
location San Francisco, CA
age 44
visits member for 1 years, 2 months
seen May 13 '13 at 10:58

Coder and teacher. Personal site at http://alexchaffee.com. Author of Code Like This. Founder and ex-CTO of Cohuman. Co-creator of Pivotal Tracker. Ex-Pivot.


Feb
1
awarded  Yearling
Dec
17
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
3
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
2
comment Derogatory term for electronic device
doodad implies the gadget or feature in question is superficial or trivial -- also that the speaker might not be able to remember its name
Feb
12
awarded  Commentator
Feb
12
comment 'Has found' versus 'found'
"helper instincts" -- perfectly understandable. I'm still getting the hang of etiquette here.
Feb
12
comment 'Has found' versus 'found'
meta question for @JonHanna -- why did you write this as a comment instead of an answer? Seems pretty answery to me.
Feb
12
comment Are “that's it” and “that's all” interchangeable?
"That's all doesn't seem to be an expression all by itself" -- You forget the Merrie Melodies Porky Pig signoff: "That's all, folks!" youtube.com/watch?v=aNEd0_rm6kU
Feb
12
awarded  Scholar
Feb
12
comment Should “two weeks vacation” be “two weeks' vacation” (possessive)?
Genitive case! Brilliant.
Feb
12
accepted Should “two weeks vacation” be “two weeks' vacation” (possessive)?
Feb
12
comment Should “two weeks vacation” be “two weeks' vacation” (possessive)?
Sure, but now try it without the indefinite article, and using the phrase as a direct object, and using a countable noun (not 'wood'). Where "I took a two day holiday" works, you'd need to say "I took two days of holiday", and to remove the of, you'd need to put "two days" in the genitive case (thanks, guypursey) to make "I took two days' holiday".
Feb
12
comment Should “two weeks vacation” be “two weeks' vacation” (possessive)?
Well, both, but specifically, what I and Fowler both said: "the vacation is of the weeks, i.e. possessed by it"
Feb
12
revised “X is famous” vs. “X was famous”
tweak
Feb
12
comment Should “two weeks vacation” be “two weeks' vacation” (possessive)?
"Two weeks' notice" (possessive) is most certainly correct (although other constructions may also be correct). "Five years' imprisonment, Three weeks' holiday, etc. Years and weeks may be treated as possessives and given an apostrophe or as adjectival nouns without one. The former is perhaps better, as to conform to what is inevitable in the singular – a year's imprisonment, a fortnight's holiday." - Fowler's Modern English Usage, cited in en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noun_adjunct -- Interesting point about the indefinite article though.
Feb
12
awarded  Student
Feb
12
awarded  Editor
Feb
12
revised Should “two weeks vacation” be “two weeks' vacation” (possessive)?
minor edit
Feb
12
answered “X is famous” vs. “X was famous”
Feb
12
asked Should “two weeks vacation” be “two weeks' vacation” (possessive)?