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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 28 votes cast
Jan
15
awarded  Yearling
Nov
19
comment Word or short phrase for something that constantly monitors
OK, I'm convinced that "watchdog" and "monitor" are more standard words for this. I've upvoted those answers, but it's up to OP if they want to change their accepted answer.
Nov
17
comment Word or short phrase for something that constantly monitors
@200_success Interesting. Maybe it depends on your background? I'm a programmer and haven't seen "sentinel" used at all; it just seemed like a good metaphor - probably better for a thing that's actively watching than for something that functions more like a label. And lots of words do get re-used in different domains. A "node" in a graph and a "node" in a database cluster are different things.
Nov
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
16
answered Word or short phrase for something that constantly monitors
Sep
18
awarded  Yearling
Aug
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
5
answered Phrase for a situation where a problem disappears when you are about to fix it, but reappears later
Apr
28
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
27
answered Plural of “Index” - “Indexes” or “indices”?
Nov
27
awarded  Yearling
Nov
21
comment Man-hour vs. person-hour? Is the former now considered politically incorrect?
@Mehrdad "personpower" sounds awkward. Probably in most cases you can just rephrase: "we are understaffed", etc.
Nov
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
21
comment Man-hour vs. person-hour? Is the former now considered politically incorrect?
I understand your sentiment and have seen examples I considered silly. But "meaning" is more that definition, it's also connotation. "Fat" and "overweight" mean roughly the same thing, but "fat" has a more offensive feel. You probably don't use it as freely, because you want to be kind, even if you personally don't see the difference as important. Being considerate means considering how someone else feels, not how you think they should feel. If a woman told you she felt excluded by "man hours", would you say "get over it", or try to be considerate?
Nov
20
revised Man-hour vs. person-hour? Is the former now considered politically incorrect?
added 1 character in body
Nov
20
awarded  Yearling
Nov
20
revised Man-hour vs. person-hour? Is the former now considered politically incorrect?
added 44 characters in body
Nov
20
answered Man-hour vs. person-hour? Is the former now considered politically incorrect?
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Apr
16
comment What is the rule for adjective order?
@cori - the fascinating linguistic point is that native speakers will have subconsciously inferred a rule like this without it ever being stated. The "rule" is really an observation of what they do. All languages and dialects consist of such unconscious rules.