133 reputation
4
bio website
location
age 28
visits member for 1 year, 6 months
seen Oct 20 '13 at 21:43

I have a question.


Jun
6
awarded  Commentator
Jun
6
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
@Snubian I guess I understand your point... For instance, in the phrase I quoted, "attacker" could be translated to "atacante". If you do choose to stick with "atacante" when translating the sentence, you'll have to choose an article. Articles in Portuguese can't be gender-neutral, so you'd be facing a similar problem: should it be translated as "o atacante"(m) ou "a atacante"(f)? The solution here would be probably to avoid using "atacante" (which sounds awkward in this context anyway) and change the structure slightly for a more rich one in portuguese, something like: "Porque quem ataca...".
Jun
6
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
That's very interesting! And "Charlie" is a very smart choice since it's both a common name for men and women. That's really cool.
Jun
6
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
Just a very curious side note... The idea of every word having a gender in Portuguese (and in many other languages) is usually quite difficult for someone whose first language is English to understand. It's common for foreigners to simply stick with one article and one pronoun and that often leads to some funny phrases.
Jun
6
accepted Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
Jun
6
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
Yes, the word for "person" is "pessoa" which is female.
Jun
6
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
Hey, guys, I find this all very amusing but I don't want to further escape the scope of the question. Would you mind pointing me to some relevant resources about this by PM? Thanks a lot.
Jun
6
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
[cont] You do have a choice when dealing with double gendered nouns, but you choose the article that precedes it, not the pronoun. For example, "student" is "estudante" and the gender of the word depends on the article before it: "o estudante"(m) or "a estudante"(f). The most common way to deal with this issue in Portuguese when it occurs is to use "o/a estudante". Because few words happen to be double gendered, it's not really a problem to occasionally use the slash.
Jun
6
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
@Snubian Not really. Most nouns in Portuguese don't leave you any options. The word carries its gender onward. For example, "server" would translate to "servidor" which is a masculine noun, so you must you masculine pronouns to refer it (or you incur in a grammatical error).
Jun
5
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
I find it interesting that choosing a pronoun can become a social issue in English and "create a sense that we are excluding half the human race." It's something difficult for me to grasp, though. My first language is Portuguese and every word has a gender, so you just choose the pronoun that's adequate. It's a gramatical issue in Portuguese, not a style one. That's also why I'm confused, I tend to intepret the problem as a gramatical one. There's a similar problem with some nouns in Portuguese that instead of being gender-neutral are in fact double gendered... but I digress.
Jun
5
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
It confuses me because I learned that English words are gender-neutral. If I had to write something like that, I also wouldn't know what pronoun to use. So when I read it, I'm confused.
Jun
5
awarded  Supporter
Jun
5
asked Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
Jan
27
awarded  Student
Jan
27
awarded  Scholar
Jan
27
accepted Struggling to understand headlines that use ellipsis
Jan
27
comment Struggling to understand headlines that use ellipsis
Thanks. I didn't know "scores" could be used as noun.
Jan
27
asked Struggling to understand headlines that use ellipsis