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Jul
1
comment What would you call a person who is self-righteous, brags about her/his moral values and is imposing when it comes to her/his ideas?
Such use of the term Pharisee is alright within a purely Christian context. Otherwise it is offensive to those who consider ourselves the heirs to the actual Pharisees, not the straw-man versions of the Christian New Testament. See also hermeneutics.stackexchange.com/a/5134/410.
Jul
1
comment Does the term “white lie” have racist connotations?
@Spacemoose only the Uruks are black; most orcs are maggot-pale.
Feb
25
comment What do you call a cylinder with a hole down the center?
… not to be confused with a foolish Dutchman.
Feb
19
comment How is “deque” commonly pronounced?
That would be unqueue, no?
Feb
11
revised Origins of “turn over in his grave”?; “turn over in her grave”? etc., etc
Replaced URL: Original (no doubt unintentionally) linked to an antisemitic site
Feb
11
suggested approved edit on Origins of “turn over in his grave”?; “turn over in her grave”? etc., etc
Jan
25
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
5
accepted Space before apostrophe
Jan
1
comment What is the saying or idiom or word that means when “friends” don’t need you anymore it seems like they don’t know you anymore
Another quote for you, from Ambrose Bierce’s The Devil’s Dictionary: “FRIENDSHIP, n. A ship big enough to carry two in fair weather, but only one in foul.”
Jan
1
comment Statement where the words are in question order
@Chrismo16, you might consider “accepting” this answer (via the checkmark); among other benefits to the site, it’ll give you a few reputation points.
Jan
1
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
1
awarded  Curious
Dec
31
comment Space before apostrophe
@tchrist, spacing “y’␣all” that way is exactly the same convention as what I noticed, but from the other side. And good point about the “French spacing”: there are thin spaces before colons & semicolons in the text as well; I’d not noticed them until you mentioned it. Could you expand your comment into an answer?
Dec
31
comment Idiom that means trying to save something that is beyond saving
@HunterHogan, “exercise in futility” is a fairly common idiom, yes.
Dec
31
awarded  Custodian
Dec
31
reviewed Reviewed Is there a verb for 'to make heroic'? Something like 'heroicised'?
Dec
31
reviewed No Action Needed Mixing use of K for thousands and MM for millions
Dec
31
asked Space before apostrophe
Dec
30
answered What's the term for not specifying race or gender when it is the majority?
Dec
10
comment Word request: Generalization of “spike” and “scuttle” and “slight”
The author said (back in June when someone proposed the term), “Denial isn't quite it either, though the entire operation tends to be called denial.” He’s looking for the verb, not the objective: “denial via ‹action›ing”.