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2h
comment “Studying PhD at the university” or “studying PhD in the university”?
Hello, user122696. Though your appreciation of English Language & Usage is gratifying, we try to discourage visitors from leaving simple "thank you" comments (especially as freestanding answers) because such comments tend to clutter the site with content that isn't useful to other prospective readers. We always welcome substantive questions and answers from new (and longtime) users, however.
2h
reviewed Reviewed What would be the best terminology for these plans?
2h
comment What would be the best terminology for these plans?
...In any case, I think that consistency of approach (e.g., Silver, Gold, and Platinum, but not Pro, Premium, and Platinum) and clarity of name (e.g., Basic, Professional, and Business for plans that target basic users, solo professionals, and businesses, respectively) are more important than a series of names out of marketing that don't convey anything but a kind of desperate enthusiasm.
2h
comment What would be the best terminology for these plans?
You have to love a client who wants to call the basic plan Basic. Along the same lines, if the middle-tier plan is aimed at "professionals," the name Pro or Professional makes a lot of intuitive sense. The industry-level plan is trickier because within the business world many finer distinctions are conveyed by category names like Small Business, Medium Business, and Enterprise (large business). If the high-end plan encompasses more than one of these subcategories, you might be best off to call it simply Business. ...
2h
reviewed Edit What is the correct syntax for using 'arrive' with a destination?
2h
revised What is the correct syntax for using 'arrive' with a destination?
Formatting and a slightly more precise header question added.
2h
reviewed Reviewed What's the opposite of “speaking clearly”?
3h
answered “), or ,”) in the middle of a sentence?
4h
comment “), or ,”) in the middle of a sentence?
You're free to punctuate however you like, of course, as long as you aren't subject to someone else's style rules, but it is not accurate to say that the alternative style is "incorrect." From Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition (2003): "6.8 Periods and commas. Periods and commas precede closing quotation marks, whether double or single. This is a traditional style, in use well before the first edition of this manual (1906)." If you were writing for publication at any U.S. publishing house that follows either Chicago or AP style, your preference would be systematically overruled.
4h
comment “), or ,”) in the middle of a sentence?
Your advice reflects one consistent way of handling commas and quotation marks—the more common British way, I believe. But in the United States, putting the comma (or period) before the close quotation mark is actually much more common than putting it outside. Both approaches agree that putting a comma immediately before or after punctuation leading to a close parenthesis is undesirable.
4h
comment Plural of table leaf
As anyone who has spent time in Canada can tell you, the primary circumstance in which a North American might use "leafs" is in connection with the professional hockey team that represents Toronto in the NHL: the Maple Leafs. Or perhaps when referring to an urbane panda presented with an overrated book on punctuation usage: It eats shoots and leafs through the text.
4h
reviewed Reviewed Plural of table leaf
4h
comment Plural of table leaf
Hello, Theresa, and welcome to English Language & Usage. Your contribution has a nice poetic ring to it, but it doesn't provide an answer to the question that the poster asks. Please consider revising it to be more directly responsive to his question. At this site, users especially appreciate documentation and relevant explanations. Thanks!
4h
reviewed Edit Does one say “Where?” or “Where at?”
4h
revised Does one say “Where?” or “Where at?”
Minor punctuation and formatting changes, plus a complete sentence to kick things off.
4h
comment Poetic Devices for english
Are you wondering about the literary device of saying something like "go the distance" or "go the extra mile," or are you wondering about the literary device of stacking similar notions, as in "to go the distance, to go the extra mile"? Presumably these are two different devices. Also, have you found out anything relevant to the question in your own research so far?
5h
reviewed Looks OK Words that are synonyms for multiple meanings?
5h
comment What is the correct grammar here?
Hi, DJ Far. You're right, obviously, but I don't think that circling option (b) of the OP's two-choice question is likely to be of much help to that person. In the weird etiquette of EL&U, you would probably not receive any criticism for submitting exactly the same words that you give in this answer as a comment beneath the OP's question. But as an answer, it's inadequate. My advice is to delete the answer here and then either restate it as a comment or abandon it altogether. But if you want to run it as an answer, I think that you should explain to the OP why your conclusion is correct.
5h
comment “There were lots to do” vs “There was lots to do…”: is the backward existential still used?
Hello, David B, and welcome to English Language & Usage. Your advice may be helpful to a writer who is trying to decide how to express the idea that there were many things to do; but in spoken English, people say things like "There was lots to do" all the time—and in my experience native English speakers rarely if ever say "There were lots to do." So with regard to explaining why English favors the former expression over the latter, your answer isn't especially on point. Please consider supplementing your current answer with a discussion of the two phrases that the OP asks about.
5h
reviewed Delete Need a word for the inability to feel anger