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16h
revised Can we authenticate the claim that “grungy” was used to mean “envious or jealous” in 1920s slang?
added 900 characters in body
16h
revised Can we authenticate the claim that “grungy” was used to mean “envious or jealous” in 1920s slang?
added 3279 characters in body
Jul
23
comment Active vs Passive voice in lab reports, and history of scientific usage
On the other hand, consistently using passive voice can produce a similar tone of tedious repetition: "This was done. That was done. Lastly that other thing was done."
Jul
23
comment Why isn’t “him that is” instead “him who is” in this passage from the 1500s?
I don't think that they safely can. I think Follett intends his advice for more-advanced English speakers and writers.
Jul
23
revised Why isn’t “him that is” instead “him who is” in this passage from the 1500s?
Restored a missing word to a quote: _greater_.
Jul
23
answered Why isn’t “him that is” instead “him who is” in this passage from the 1500s?
Jul
23
comment What is the intransitive meaning of “control”?
The cited sentence omits the implied direct object of the verb will control, which creates a problem for nonlawyers who don't recognize or don't correctly guess the intended (but missing) word or phrase. Spelled out, the verb plus direct object may be expressed simply as "will control the result" or "will control the situation," or more elaborately (as FumbleFingers suggests) "will control judicial interpretation of the legislative intent behind the statute's wording."
Jul
23
revised Use of semi-colons vs commas when listing items with colons
added 180 characters in body
Jul
23
answered Use of semi-colons vs commas when listing items with colons
Jul
23
awarded  Organizer
Jul
23
revised Use of semi-colons vs commas when listing items with colons
edited tags
Jul
23
comment Is there reference material for dictionary abbreviations used in the first half of the 20th century?
In Merriam-Webster dictionaries for the first half of the 20th century, p. pr. meant "participle present," p. p. meant "participle past," and pret. meant "preterit." But there appears not to have been agreement throughout the field of lexicography on standard abbreviations for the various parts of speech and other explanatory or descriptive terms. Given the absence of any real consensus on abbreviations, the author's failure to provide a list of long forms for the abbreviations he employs imposes a rather grave limitation on the usefulness of his work.
Jul
23
answered When and where did saying “nice” become so popular?
Jul
23
revised Possessive case for a certain proper noun -ss apostrophe
Removed a stray quotation mark.
Jul
23
revised Possessive case for a certain proper noun -ss apostrophe
Corrected some problems with italics.
Jul
23
comment Possessive case for a certain proper noun -ss apostrophe
Right. What I'm actually trying to get at with my answer is that there is no ultimate, universal rule—which I hope will encourage writers who are unsure how to proceed to see that they aren't wrong as long as they adopt a style preference and stick to it. I hope it isn't counterproductive to cite the conflicting advice offered by major U.S. styleguides.
Jul
23
comment Possessive case for a certain proper noun -ss apostrophe
...unless (as so many writers are) you are forced to operate under someone else's house style rules, in which case the only sane thing to do is to capitulate.
Jul
23
revised Possessive case for a certain proper noun -ss apostrophe
added 233 characters in body
Jul
23
answered Possessive case for a certain proper noun -ss apostrophe
Jul
21
answered “Under/straight from the horse's mouth” — etymology?