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16m
comment Deciphering of William Henley's “Bus-Driver”: put 'a bit on'?
@CopperKettle: With regard to the 1961 edition of Partridge, I own a copy of this book; partial versions of later editions of Partridge's work (e.g., books.google.com/… and books.google.com/…) are available online, but the hit-or-miss nature of the pages shown can make using them a bit frustrating.
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comment Deciphering of William Henley's “Bus-Driver”: put 'a bit on'?
@CopperKettle: Incidentally, Partridge also observes that a smoke-ho, smoke-oh, or smoko was "A cessation from work in order nominally to smoke, certainly to rest" (with citations for the usage from 1897 and 1900). This may be the sense of "flagrant smoke" in the tenth line.
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answered Deciphering of William Henley's “Bus-Driver”: put 'a bit on'?
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revised Deciphering of William Henley's “Bus-Driver”: put 'a bit on'?
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comment What is a good verb to describe the pleasant sound of rain
@Always Asking: In that case, in addition to the excellent suggestions by Rusty Tuba, Nick2253, and Sharkusha, you might consider the less common verb percuss: "to tap sharply; esp. to practice percussion on." Merriam-Webster dates that verb to 1560.
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answered What is a good verb to describe the pleasant sound of rain
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answered Speaking with a forked tongue
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answered Using the word “Disposition” as a Verb
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answered What does “throw a wrinkle” mean?
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comment Meaning and origin of “put a wrinkle on one's horn”
The instance from the February 1830 issue of The Medico-Chirurgical Review is an excellent find, Mari-Lou A—and it beats my earliest match by eight years. Because the reviews are unsigned, I can't tell whether this particular wording came from England or from the United States; but it appears from this summary that the Review may have been published first in London. A collection from 1844 shows the Review being simultaneously published in London and New York. More complications!
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comment Meaning and origin of “put a wrinkle on one's horn”
Every answer that has appeared here so far contributes something useful to the discussion. I'm glad you added yours. I feel a little embarrassed that I didn't know about the annual additional wrinkling of cows' horns, given that my grandfather raised cattle on his farm in Texas, but my excuse is that he raised (hornless) Aberdeen Angus.
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revised Meaning and origin of “put a wrinkle on one's horn”
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answered Meaning and origin of “put a wrinkle on one's horn”
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asked Meaning and origin of “put a wrinkle on one's horn”
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revised Why is the sentence “I go to the US for studying English.” wrong?
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comment Why is the sentence “I go to the US for studying English.” wrong?
To complicate your understanding of the vagaries of English, I note that adding the phrases "plan to" and "the purpose of" to your original wording would yield a sentence that is perfectly acceptable in everyday English: "I plan to go to the U.S. for the purpose of studying English."
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revised How to do you pronounce Ouroboros?
Fixed typo: urbooros --> uroboros
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answered Usage: derogatory + towards + X
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revised Where did the term “Double Standard” originate?
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answered Where did the term “Double Standard” originate?