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visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen Jul 28 at 15:58

Jan
22
awarded  Yearling
Dec
20
awarded  Good Question
Dec
20
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
25
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
29
answered Using apostrophes correctly
Jan
25
comment The camera adds ten pounds?
@InglishTeeture: I believe the article is referring to the expression in terms of how it affects the photogenic nature of the subject. Typically, the apparent adding of weight will have an adverse affect on the photogenic qualities of the subject, because most people (that I know anyway) don't want to look 10 pounds heavier than they really are.
Jan
24
awarded  Commentator
Jan
24
comment What word describes this form of unreadability best?
To me, illegible gives a connotation of unclear lettering, but when I read the definition, it looks like it would be a valid word here. Personally, though, I would go with simply calling it unreadable or indecipherable, if I'm reading you right, and the writing is SOMETHINGLIKETHIS.
Jan
24
awarded  Teacher
Jan
24
comment Antonyms of “lesser” and “greater”
I think in that case, "not greater" and "not lesser" is probably the most concise wording.
Jan
24
answered Antonyms of “lesser” and “greater”
Jan
23
comment Use of “conscience” as verb
@GastonÜmlaut: That reminds me of this comic: unmemorabletitle.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/…
Jan
22
comment Is “May I have some drink?” incorrect?
@Jimmy: I'm not sure I follow. I believe I'm understanding the "Have some drink with that ice" correctly as an idiom, but I would still think that it would not be adopted idiomatically if it was awkward/bad grammatically (unless the bad grammar was intended ironically)...IOW, the expression isn't "have some drinks" with that ice, or "have a drink" with that ice, or limited to "have some water/tea/etc." Whenever the expression was coined, "have some drink" seemed to make sense in that context and apparently seemed to fit naturally enough to have caught on. Am I missing something?
Jan
22
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
22
comment Is “May I have some drink?” incorrect?
If a pitcher of beer were sitting on the table, would one essentially request the same thing by handing his companion a glass and asking him to pour him a beer vs. pour him some beer?
Jan
22
comment Is “May I have some drink?” incorrect?
I've edited the title to eliminate confusion. As it stood, I could see the question being interpreted as one over the usage of "can" rather than "some drink".
Jan
22
awarded  Editor
Jan
22
revised Is “May I have some drink?” incorrect?
Edited title to fix grammatical error
Jan
22
comment Is “May I have some drink?” incorrect?
That's fair enough. I suppose, one way or another, my wife was correct in chastising me for my poor grammar.
Jan
22
awarded  Scholar