216 reputation
411
bio website
location Hong Kong
age
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Oct 25 at 8:42

Aug
30
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
17
awarded  Caucus
Jun
17
awarded  Constituent
Mar
11
comment Is there a dash between “n-second”
BTW, maybe it should be called a hyphen, not a dash.
Mar
11
comment What do you call a person who doesn't keep his word?
What about traitor?
Mar
5
comment “Help in doing something” or “Help doing something”
According to OED, "help in doing something" and "help (somebody) do something" are preferred.
Mar
5
accepted “be denied” or “be denied by”
Mar
5
comment “be denied” or “be denied by”
Thanks oerkelens, now it looks grammatical. But it seems "Freedom is denied to us by concealed traditions" doesn't make sense in the context ... should it be "by the sense mentioned in the previous sentence"?
Mar
5
revised “be denied” or “be denied by”
added 915 characters in body
Mar
5
asked “be denied” or “be denied by”
Feb
25
comment ‘Due to’ vs ‘Because of’ — Which is correct in this sentence?
I think they are both fine. Merriam-Webster online even defines "due to" as "because of".
Feb
25
comment Should I use present tense in reporting speech?
Hmm I see, thanks all the same. The link in F.E.'s comment is interesting and comprehensive, maybe you also would like to read it :)
Feb
25
comment problem about “that” / a conjunction? or r.pronoun?
That that is a "that clause" (one type of the defining relative clauses).
Feb
25
comment Show I use “lay,” “laid,” or “lain” in the following passage?
It should be "lain". Just look up your dictionary :)
Feb
25
comment Should I use present tense in reporting speech?
As a non-native English speaker, I feel "Peter said the sky is blue" sounds awful. Can you cite some well-known literature to show that it is really common in use? Thanks.
Feb
21
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
18
comment Correct phrase for “Chain of equations”
@PeterShor Thank you for the info!
Jan
21
awarded  Yearling
Jun
21
awarded  Enthusiast
Jun
15
comment Would you say 'yes, neither do I' / 'yes, me neither'?
--I don't like driving. (Do you?) --No, neither do I. <- maybe in formal English it should be like this.