101 reputation
4
bio website none
location West Allis, WI
age 37
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen yesterday

Martin started writing programs in GW Basic on a Tandy 1000 TL/2 in 8th grade, but did not really learn anything about software design until after highschool when working in LP-C on the LP-Mud Nightmare. He spent too many years writing software just for fun on the side while working retail to pay the bills.

Martin picked up professional experience working as a private contractor for Nocturnal Entertainment Australia on the Game Boy Advance title Ultimate Arcade Games. With a shiped title under his belt he attempted to move into a full time position in the industry but ultimately fell short. Disappointed, Martin decided to return to school to flesh out his skill set. In the process he discovered he enjoyed the problem solving and design of complex systems more than the game development. He graduated at(or nearly so) the top of his class at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee with a degree in Computer Engineering.

Today he works on the Enterprise Management Technologies team at Quad/Graphics.


Aug
1
comment Expression for “Respect them and suspect them”
'Speak softly and carry a big stick.' has nothing to do with respect with distrust. Rather it describes respect with threat. To put in terms of the OP's story, instead of quietly making it difficult/impossible for a thief to get away, the Rabbi would have openly hinted to the stranger what would happen to any thieves caught in the house, so the stranger would wisely choose not to attempt the theft in the first place.
Jul
2
comment What is a word for annoying behavior which decreases enjoyment for the other players in a game?
@user I'll grant you that, from the perspective of the one who has played in many rounds, a camper first showing up in round 10 could easily be indistinguishable from a previous opponent changing to camping tactics. I was thinking more along the lines of 1st round encounter a camper, it would seem weird to use these words.
Jul
2
comment What is a word for annoying behavior which decreases enjoyment for the other players in a game?
I would find killjoy, spoilsport, and party pooper all odd in this context unless either: The unfair behavior represents a change in tactics brought about by losing while playing fair, or The guilty party has previously been asked to play nice but continues anyway. Sad is good though.
May
1
comment A word for the heart-wrenching pain of wanting someone you can't have
I find 'Agony' is appropriate: youtube.com/watch?v=LFgMowOwek0
Apr
25
comment Word for the emotion behind “D'oh!”
Flustered carries an element of confusion with it, "D'oh!" does not as normally used. "D'oh?" on the other hand...
Mar
27
comment What is the name of the tactic that politicians use to bury people with torrent of words?
Filibuster's direct purpose is to waste time and doesn't hide the fact that the content presented in a filibuster is usually irrelevant. Bloviate provided by bib is a better fit for the OP, with the speaker acting as if there is importance in their words.
Mar
6
comment Is there a secular, non vulgar alternative to “for heaven's sake”?
When I had kid's I started replacing my use of f*ck with Fahrvergnügen.
Feb
21
comment Was I driving more than 5 mph under the speed limit, or less than 5 mph under the speed limit?
To go along with Keshlam's comment below, rewrite for clarity 'I was driving under the speed limit by more than 5mph.' or 'I was driving under the speed limit by less than 5mph.'
Feb
21
awarded  Commentator
Feb
21
comment Was I driving more than 5 mph under the speed limit, or less than 5 mph under the speed limit?
@franssu I'm sorry. Though they carry the same units, the difference between two speeds is conceptually not the same thing as a speed. 'This difference is faster than that difference.' does not make sense. It sounds to me like you are trying to compare the rate of change of the differences. 'This difference is larger than that difference.' conveys your intended meaning though.
Dec
18
comment One word for Christmas?
This immediately explains the alien attacks that always happen to fall on Christmas. Or is it the other way around?
Nov
13
comment A phrase whose meaning is different from a combination of its constituents?
not sure 'grand theft auto' (not the title) really violates the principle of compositionality. It is a further categorization of grand theft (large theft) which is typically defined as theft with a total value over some threshold. Now 'grand auto theft' would be 'theft of a big car'.
Nov
13
comment A phrase whose meaning is different from a combination of its constituents?
weird science would be a kind of science, Weird Science would be the movie (the title of which implies the 'science' in the movie is weird).
Oct
7
awarded  Editor
Oct
7
revised Describing “not knowing what to do” (as a response to an unexpected event that happened)?
included text from Dictionary.com
Oct
7
answered Describing “not knowing what to do” (as a response to an unexpected event that happened)?
Sep
9
comment Is there a word for a person who doesn't think the rules apply to him?
teenager springs to mind.
Sep
5
comment Word that describes someone that causes his own misfortune
Really wish I could answer this one: You might try tragic. In classic literature, tragic heroes were destined for downfall brought about by their own hand. "The change to bad fortune which he undergoes is not due to any moral defect or flaw, but a mistake of some kind." -Aristotle, Poetics
Feb
28
comment What's the opposite of “omniscient”?
@Pacerier What I am suggesting is there are varying degrees of knowledge, and omniscient is a special word for the highest degree, or 'having the most knowledge'. The complement is 'not having the most knowledge'. The opposite is 'having the least knowledge'. They are still distinct. Rather than hot a better comparison can be made to hottest. The complement is not hottest, the opposite is coldest. These words are special words for indicating levels of heat.
Feb
26
comment What's the opposite of “omniscient”?
If you are looking for the complement of omniscient and not the opposite can you update the question to indicate that? 'Not having all knowledge' is not the opposite of 'having all knowledge', 'having no knowledge' would be.