236 reputation
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visits member for 1 year, 3 months
seen Apr 1 at 18:48

Mar
27
awarded  Yearling
Mar
27
answered Is there an English word for a person who shares your name?
Feb
4
awarded  Custodian
Feb
4
reviewed Satisfactory Better term to put on a label of a bottle of milk to describe that it's 'made' in a particular geographic location
Jan
30
comment “Optional machines to work with”
I'm not sold on using optional here. It conveys the idea that it's OK if you don't pick any, but the way I get the context it's not OK. Why not stick with available?
Jan
30
revised Using apostrophes correctly
added 14 characters in body
Jan
29
answered Using apostrophes correctly
Jan
28
comment Which is grammatically correct: “woke up by the…” or “woke up to the…”?
The first is grammatically correct, but it has a different meaning (which does not make sense with this particular sentence). By assumes the meaning of next to here, but of course it only makes sense if the complement is something you can be next to (like stairs or a person, not a sound).
Jan
17
comment Proper tense and form of questions
@Cerberus Turn into an answer maybe?
Jan
16
comment Do Americans use the term “garburator” or is there a better equivalent?
I never heard the word, but I love it!
Jan
14
awarded  Teacher
Jan
14
awarded  Editor
Jan
14
revised When would I use “transience” vs “impermanence”?
Added links to Merriam-Webster
Jan
14
comment When would I use “transience” vs “impermanence”?
Here's Merriam-Webster for transient, and for impermanent. As you can see there is emphasis of brevity for transient, whereas impermanent is just defined as the opposite of permanent (although transient is marked as a synonym).
Jan
14
answered When would I use “transience” vs “impermanence”?
Jan
14
awarded  Supporter