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seen Jul 29 at 10:14

Jul
11
awarded  Critic
Jul
11
comment What's the meaning of “in the spirit of”?
No reason why this answer should be downvoted really.
Jul
3
awarded  Popular Question
May
27
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
4
accepted Adjectives with Latin etymology when noun has non-Latin etymology
Jan
29
comment Adjectives with Latin etymology when noun has non-Latin etymology
Very interesting answer. Nevertheless, it doesn't fully satisfy me: the concept of 'related to the moon' certainly wasn't unknown to the peasants of the Middle Ages. So, either there wasn't an adjective to describe that concept, or there was one that doesn't come from Latin. Or it was lunar, but then the whole explaination of Latin being used for "high" culture seems a bit unsatisfactory :)
Jan
27
comment Is “means” plural or singular?
also: by all means
Jan
27
comment Why English pronunciation differs so much from written language, compared to German?
does the fact that it's never had any b sound justify your defining it unetymological? if etymology is "the history of a word or word element, including its origins and derivation" (EB), then the fact that the b isn't spelled doesn't really make any difference. but coming to your second argument, that's really interesting. Wiktionary says "The unpronounced "b" in the modern English spelling, is a Latinisation from the Latin etymon dēbitum.". Do you have any more info on that?
Jan
27
comment Adjectives with Latin etymology when noun has non-Latin etymology
how can it be impossible? there must have been a way to express the concept of 'related to the sun' without resorting to Latin in the language(s) English comes from, right?
Jan
27
revised Adjectives with Latin etymology when noun has non-Latin etymology
removed subjective part; added 94 characters in body
Jan
27
asked Adjectives with Latin etymology when noun has non-Latin etymology
Jan
27
comment Why English pronunciation differs so much from written language, compared to German?
i don't understand what you're saying about debt. doesn't it come from debitum ?
Jan
27
awarded  Scholar
Jan
27
comment Do the German 'von' and English 'from' share the same root?
it would also be interesting to check how reliable wiktionary is, at least in this case, seeing how it seems to be the source of every answer
Jan
27
accepted Do the German 'von' and English 'from' share the same root?
Jan
26
awarded  Editor
Jan
26
revised Do the German 'von' and English 'from' share the same root?
added 262 characters in body
Jan
26
comment Do the German 'von' and English 'from' share the same root?
i can't see any clear indication that they are related from what you posted :)
Jan
26
awarded  Student
Jan
26
asked Do the German 'von' and English 'from' share the same root?