266 reputation
15
bio website about.me/andy_dent
location Perth, Australia
age 51
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 2 hours ago

CTO and Co-founder of mobile messaging startup touchgr.am.

Graduate at the Founder Institute, from the 2014 semester in Perth Western Australia.

Occasional freelance multi-platform software developer currently busy on iOS Lingopal.

Author of "Getting Started with LevelDB" from Packt.

  • non-computing interests:
    • Chow Gar Kung Fu and Yang-style Tai Chi,
    • reading and (so-far unpublished) writing SF
    • snow skiing
    • scuba diving,
    • solar housing,
    • carpentry
  • computing interests:
    • Functional programming and tools
    • OOD, OO languages and frameworks
    • Usability,
    • cross-platform development,
    • code generation

Sep
5
answered How do you use the word “arguably”?
Sep
5
comment What is a group of cars on the road called?
Pocket seems the antithesis as it normally indicates a hole in a solid or surface.
Sep
5
comment What is a group of cars on the road called?
It's a pack if it is motorcycles.
Sep
5
answered What is a group of cars on the road called?
Aug
28
answered Person who fills out a form - single word
Jul
7
answered Is there a polite way of saying “people like you”?
Jul
5
awarded  Yearling
Jul
5
answered What is the meaning of the pejorative form of “gay”?
May
12
answered uncountable noun + and + uncountable noun
Nov
6
answered Opposite of Ground Up
Aug
8
comment “occur” vs “occurs” with a singular collective noun
glad you're all having such fun with this ;-) Now imagine I'm saying "batch of writes" sounding like Crocodile Dundee mocking Monty Python.
Aug
8
comment “occur” vs “occurs” with a singular collective noun
This is a case of a technical vocabulary where a common shorthand is being used. In this case you could say "writes" stands for "write function calls" or "write requests".
Aug
8
awarded  Editor
Aug
8
awarded  Scholar
Aug
8
accepted “occur” vs “occurs” with a singular collective noun
Aug
8
revised “occur” vs “occurs” with a singular collective noun
added more context
Aug
8
asked “occur” vs “occurs” with a singular collective noun
Nov
27
comment What's a word for an instance in which one has an opinion about something without having tried it?
confabulator = born advertising copywriter
Nov
27
answered How do I say something “contains a lot of content” using a single word?
Jan
12
awarded  Teacher