Phil Whittington

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406 reputation
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visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Mar 17 at 14:00

Mar
1
awarded  Yearling
Mar
2
comment The Guardian: “It does indeed […] misleading them […]”
Haha! :-) kudos, FumbleFingers
Mar
2
comment The Guardian: “It does indeed […] misleading them […]”
No, not annoying at all. I wouldn't be on here if I didn't love these sorts of questions. I suppose it does mean it's grammatically wrong in that the verbs don't agree. The sentence on its own would be grammatically correct (but tricky to navigate) if the verbs tallied, so I guess I agree that it's incorrect on the basis you give in your second comment.
Mar
2
revised The Guardian: “It does indeed […] misleading them […]”
deleted 5 characters in body
Mar
2
answered “Least expensive” vs “most inexpensive”
Mar
2
comment The Guardian: “It does indeed […] misleading them […]”
@Armen, second comment - yes, you're right of course, I'd missed that. I imagine the author means, "It does indeed...formally end 254 years of democracy in the United States of America" - I expect in a previous draft this was in the present tense. Maybe she recast para 1 without checking for dependencies later in the piece.
Mar
2
comment The Guardian: “It does indeed […] misleading them […]”
The latter - there's nothing grammatically wrong. I'm not a purist of the "no sentences start with but" variety, who would probably blanche at a paragraph starting in that way. But the cues you're given as you read the piece (including that sentence) don't match the structure that follows, so it's difficult to read quickly.
Mar
2
answered The Guardian: “It does indeed […] misleading them […]”
Feb
28
awarded  Editor
Feb
28
revised Which usage is more common? (singular / plural)
deleted 3 characters in body
Feb
28
awarded  Commentator
Feb
28
comment “Today's assumption” or “todays assumption” — which is valid grammar?
Upvote for quoting Shakespeare :-)
Feb
28
answered Which usage is more common? (singular / plural)
Feb
28
answered Apostrophe before or after s?
Feb
28
comment “Fluids” versus “liquids”?
A fluid can even be a powder if it is fine enough to be thought of as something that flows like a liquid would for the purposes under discussion.
Feb
28
answered “Me” or “Myself”- which one is correct here?
Feb
28
awarded  Supporter
Feb
28
comment What do you call someone whose rights have been taken away from them?
You may want to re-word this question, "What do you call someone whose rights have been taken away from them?"
Feb
28
comment Pronouncing “vis-à-vis”?
FumbleFingers is correct. And this is because if it's used in English then the word following vis-a-vis will of course be in English, so the French phrase stands alone. It's pronounced as Mark Beadies suggests below.
Feb
28
awarded  Critic