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Feb
9
revised Under what kind of conditions is a past time adjunct allowed for in experiential perfects?
deleted 1 character in body
Feb
9
comment Under what kind of conditions is a past time adjunct allowed for in experiential perfects?
@CandiedOrange, so is this grammatical? : I have already visited the museum many times when I was a university student.
Feb
9
awarded  Editor
Feb
9
revised Under what kind of conditions is a past time adjunct allowed for in experiential perfects?
added 218 characters in body
Feb
9
asked Under what kind of conditions is a past time adjunct allowed for in experiential perfects?
Feb
7
comment Difference of “I visited / have visited the museum many times when I was a university student.”
@Jim, how about this ?: (b') I have already visited the museum when I was a university student.
Feb
7
asked Difference of “I visited / have visited the museum many times when I was a university student.”
Feb
5
comment Is “ Whom did you give the book? ” ungrammatical?
And, the following is the quotation from CGEL: "They gave me the key (iC)""Example [ic] has the same propositional meaning as They gave the key to me, but to me is not an indirect object, not an object at all: it is syntactically quite different from me in [ic]. Objects normally have the form of NPs; to me here is a complement with the form of a PP. "
Feb
5
comment Is “ Whom did you give the book? ” ungrammatical?
"In traditional grammar, any noun phrase with a DATIVE function is an indirect object, whatever its position. Typically, when placed after the direct object the indirect object requires to or for (e.g. They bought a bicycle for her, and gave it to her). Modern grammars vary as to whether they classify such prepositional phrases as indirect objects or not."
Feb
5
comment Is “ Whom did you give the book? ” ungrammatical?
I didn't claim that an indirect object is not an indirect object after wh-fronting. I was not right in claiming an indirect object is no longer an indirect object when placed immediately after a preposition. See the quotation from "indirect object" entry of the Oxford dictionary of English in the comment below.
Feb
4
comment Is “ Whom did you give the book? ” ungrammatical?
No, I'm not. Probably you need to read this.
Feb
3
comment Is “ Whom did you give the book? ” ungrammatical?
"And wh-fronting the indirect object does not remove the need for the to." That is the problem. If "whom" comes immediately after "to", it is no longer an "indirect object". It is an object of the preposition "to". If the indirect object is wh-fronted, it never need "to" in front of it. This confusion makes your last sentence in your answer incomprehensible, which is the reason why some complain about it.
Feb
3
comment Is “ Whom did you give the book? ” ungrammatical?
Dropping "to" only makes sense to the sentence (3) which is derived from "You gave the book to him" by wh-movement of the object of "to", whereas I stated in my question that I constructed (2) "based on the sentence (1)". In fact other answers and comments suggest they understood what I meant.
Feb
3
comment Is “ Whom did you give the book? ” ungrammatical?
> two of the examples sentences where it is treated as being possibly grammatical have a second question word as the direct object. Yes, of course!
Feb
3
comment Is “ Whom did you give the book? ” ungrammatical?
One possible reasoning I found is that the indirect object is not questioned since only the last part (direct object) carries a new information. What do you think?
Feb
3
comment Is “ Whom did you give the book? ” ungrammatical?
Thank you for the detailed explanations and enlightening comments. I've found some books you mentioned. So, I will spend some time reading them.
Feb
3
accepted Is “ Whom did you give the book? ” ungrammatical?
Feb
3
comment Is “ Whom did you give the book? ” ungrammatical?
>OP believes he can drop the to. I don't. I'm sorry to say this, but your answer explains nothing other than the statement that this is ungrammatical. My question is whether wh-movement of the indirect object is permissible.
Feb
3
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Feb
2
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