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1h
asked The rhetorical effect of “no more … than” construction
1d
asked the idiomatic use of “no more than” and “no less than”
2d
accepted the meaning of “they should not look nearly as different as they do”
Jul
27
asked the meaning of “they should not look nearly as different as they do”
Jul
13
asked future tense in a subordinate clause
Jul
9
accepted “He spends twice as much money as I earn” is correct?
Jul
8
asked “He spends twice as much money as I earn” is correct?
Jun
27
accepted Usage of *was going to do*
Jun
27
comment Usage of *was going to do*
@JulieCarter, Thanks.
Jun
27
comment Usage of *was going to do*
@JulieCarter , then he talked after the election about the result of the election (2.5% of UKIP supporters voted for the Tories) from the view point of the time prior to the election when nobody knew how much effect it would achieve. It is not "intention in the past" nor "arrangement in the past". What is it? What is the difference from "it persuaded 2.5%" or "it had persuaded 2.5%"?
Jun
27
comment Usage of *was going to do*
I meant that if we interpret the past tense use of "be going to" as "arrangement in the past" sense then it doesn't fit in the context.If the adviser meant that the Tories had expected before the election 5% of the electorate to switch to the Tories, then he didn't say that "they did not realize how much".
Jun
27
comment Usage of *was going to do*
The term "arrangement" suggests that the Tory estimated that the effect would be 2.5%, which I think contradicts the statement immediately before the phrase we are concerned "perhaps they (Tory) did not realise how much(impact it would have)".
Jun
27
asked Usage of *was going to do*
Jun
15
asked Is this subjunctive?
Jun
5
accepted hypothetical past in a relative clause
Jun
4
asked hypothetical past in a relative clause
Jun
13
accepted Is “How do you … ?” a polite question to ask the right way to do things?
Jun
11
comment Is “How do you … ?” a polite question to ask the right way to do things?
@AndrewLeach Why is that ? It seems more natural to me to say "How should I spell ...?".
Jun
11
asked Is “How do you … ?” a polite question to ask the right way to do things?
Jan
16
accepted Usage of “against” in “progress against our strategic objectives”