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Aug
19
comment Which word is this relative pronoun the object of?
@PeterShor:I understand. Thank you.
Aug
19
awarded  Commentator
Aug
19
comment Which word is this relative pronoun the object of?
@PeterShor: Though "throw out" is a prepositional verb, "gesture towards" is not. "gesture" needs another object. For example, "The couple is gestured towards the potential reinvigoration of a marriage". But, does this fit into the original sentence?
Aug
19
asked Which word is this relative pronoun the object of?
Aug
5
comment the idiomatic use of “no more than” and “no less than”
@JohnLawler: Thank you very much.
Aug
4
comment the idiomatic use of “no more than” and “no less than”
@JohnLawler: Thank you for your explanation. Now, I understand roughly your answer in the link. I also found a description about NPIs in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language , which I'm reading currently. So, "no more than" is comparative + overt negative = overnegation ? Let me ask you one more question. What is the difference between the "exactly as..as" and the "at least as..as" equative ?
Aug
3
awarded  Teacher
Aug
3
comment the idiomatic use of “no more than” and “no less than”
@JohnLawler: Sadly I cannot understand your answer in the link. But, I'm interested in it anyway. Where is the (covert) negative element in the sentences ? What is the relationship between the negative element and NPIs? What are NPIs in the first place. Perhaps, this is not the right place to ask this kind of questions. Could you suggest books or articles explaining these topics?
Aug
2
awarded  Promoter
Aug
1
answered the idiomatic use of “no more than” and “no less than”
Aug
1
asked The rhetorical effect of “no more … than” construction
Jul
31
asked the idiomatic use of “no more than” and “no less than”
Jul
29
accepted the meaning of “they should not look nearly as different as they do”
Jul
27
asked the meaning of “they should not look nearly as different as they do”
Jul
13
asked future tense in a subordinate clause
Jul
9
accepted “He spends twice as much money as I earn” is correct?
Jul
8
asked “He spends twice as much money as I earn” is correct?
Jun
27
accepted Usage of *was going to do*
Jun
27
comment Usage of *was going to do*
@JulieCarter, Thanks.
Jun
27
comment Usage of *was going to do*
@JulieCarter , then he talked after the election about the result of the election (2.5% of UKIP supporters voted for the Tories) from the view point of the time prior to the election when nobody knew how much effect it would achieve. It is not "intention in the past" nor "arrangement in the past". What is it? What is the difference from "it persuaded 2.5%" or "it had persuaded 2.5%"?