238 reputation
29
bio website abluescarab.us
location Oregon
age 20
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Jun 17 at 1:00

I'm mainly a web developer, but I also use other languages, including C++, C#, VB.NET, and ActionScript 2. I'm an intermediate-level programmer in HTML, CSS, PHP, and JavaScript/jQuery. The tools I use to program are Aptana Studio 3, Dreamweaver CS5.5, Flash Professional CS5.5, Visual Studio, and MonoDevelop.

I'm also familiar with photo-manipulation and art programs such as PhotoShop CS5 and Elements, GIMP, and Inkscape. I use the FileZilla FTP client to upload files to my webserver.

I'm an avid gamer and I intend to get a Bachelor's in Computer Science to get a job as a game developer.


Jun
17
awarded  Caucus
Jun
17
awarded  Constituent
Feb
20
comment Em-dash vs colon: “Remind me: what's your name again?” or “Remind me—what's your name again?”
@Mari-LouA Sorry that it didn't help. I know I have a hard time remembering key combinations like Alt+0151. The only one I remember is the copyright symbol.
Feb
19
comment Em-dash vs colon: “Remind me: what's your name again?” or “Remind me—what's your name again?”
@Mari-LouA Sorry if you get this twice. I have to admit that I'm not all that clear on how international keyboards work, but hopefully this will be able to help you. On a Mac, an em-dash character is accomplished by pressing Opt, Shift, - (minus). On Windows, hold the Alt key and press 0151 on your right keypad, in that order. If you have a laptop, you may have to use a special tool. On Windows, this tool is called the "Character Map". On Linux, you may want to read this.
Feb
19
awarded  Commentator
Feb
14
comment Em-dash vs colon: “Remind me: what's your name again?” or “Remind me—what's your name again?”
As RegDwight pointed out, it is also acceptable to use a comma.
Feb
14
comment Em-dash vs colon: “Remind me: what's your name again?” or “Remind me—what's your name again?”
Sorry, the double hyphen is a bad habit I've adopted from using Microsoft Word. I've consistently forgotten that it doesn't actually work in other settings as an em-dash.
Feb
14
comment Em-dash vs colon: “Remind me: what's your name again?” or “Remind me—what's your name again?”
Perfect, thank you. The Wikipedia articles helped immensely.
Feb
14
accepted Em-dash vs colon: “Remind me: what's your name again?” or “Remind me—what's your name again?”
Feb
14
asked Em-dash vs colon: “Remind me: what's your name again?” or “Remind me—what's your name again?”
Jan
27
comment “Far enough removed” vs. “far removed enough” vs. “removed far enough”
Ah, I see. Thank you for the clarification.
Jan
27
comment “Far enough removed” vs. “far removed enough” vs. “removed far enough”
I don't really understand what your above comment means. Would you care to explain?
Jan
17
awarded  Student
Sep
22
awarded  Yearling
Sep
22
comment Does the word “since” ever have a meaning of “thus”, “hereby” ones?
I see the word "since" in this sentence as actually meaning because. Being a programmer (though I don't know Perl), I vaguely understand what it's saying, and from what I see, it does mean because. "They don’t really care whether they were invoked from tie, nor do any of the other methods in the class, because you can always invoke them directly if you’d like." This means they don't care etc etc because you can always invoke them directly.
Sep
22
comment Is 'used to' describing something changed?
@J.R. Pff, I totally didn't pick up on that. smacks myself
Sep
22
comment Is 'used to' describing something changed?
@J.R. I find all language beautiful (being the way two people converse), but I also find that language can be unnecessarily complicated, some languages moreso than others.
Sep
22
awarded  Critic
Sep
22
awarded  Editor
Sep
22
revised Is 'used to' describing something changed?
Changed to blockquotes