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Mar
1
comment Looking for words or phrases to fit the idea of this form of hierarchy
@jwpat7 I've added another example. To take the first one, languages/english/spelling is more specific than languages/english.
Mar
1
revised Looking for words or phrases to fit the idea of this form of hierarchy
added 64 characters in body
Mar
1
comment Looking for words or phrases to fit the idea of this form of hierarchy
@jwpat7 Thank you for your comment. The question has been edited.
Mar
1
revised Looking for words or phrases to fit the idea of this form of hierarchy
deleted 4 characters in body
Feb
29
asked Looking for words or phrases to fit the idea of this form of hierarchy
Jan
9
awarded  Yearling
Dec
5
comment The meaning of “to cut the biscuit”
@Matt Эллен I've added an example of a phrase where it's being used.
Dec
5
revised The meaning of “to cut the biscuit”
added 246 characters in body
Dec
5
asked The meaning of “to cut the biscuit”
Sep
2
comment An expression that adds little information
Are you certain of that FumbleFingers? If so, should the expression be used post mortem?
Sep
2
awarded  Self-Learner
Sep
2
comment An expression that adds little information
I'll accept your answer. Do you happen to know if there is a difference between tautology, pleonasm and redudancy? Or are they synonymous?
Sep
2
accepted An expression that adds little information
Sep
2
answered An expression that adds little information
Sep
2
comment An expression that adds little information
If it's in the context of an accident, the expression doesn't add anything to the fact that a person was instantly killed. On the other hand, saying that a person succombed to their injuries adds the information that they were still alive shortly afterwards.
Sep
2
revised An expression that adds little information
deleted 17 characters in body
Sep
2
asked An expression that adds little information
Aug
25
comment What do you call a disk with a hole in the middle?
A rounded disc (drawn by rotating a circle around a center point) being called a torus.
Aug
15
revised Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
Added an explanation to the link
Aug
15
comment Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
I learned something today :)