409 reputation
27
bio website linkedin.com/in/jamespoulson
location Belgium
age
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Mar 20 at 20:41

Working on getting a bachelor's degree and specializing in Java.

Email: http://www.google.com/recaptcha/mailhide/d?k=01bAFtpP0H2MRIgFlNka5Lpw==&c=KvU68hI3HAlpXUPSLJ6M822HbkfwWPfvvKZ8eNMtN-k= (reCAPTCHA)

Blog@Developpez.com: http://blog.developpez.com/james-poulson/

MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/jamespoulson

User page at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:JamesPoulson

"The older I get, the more I see a straight path where I want to go. If you’re going to hunt elephants, don’t get off the trail for a rabbit." - T. Boone Pickens


Dec
5
comment The meaning of “to cut the biscuit”
@Matt Эллен I've added an example of a phrase where it's being used.
Dec
5
revised The meaning of “to cut the biscuit”
added 246 characters in body
Dec
5
asked The meaning of “to cut the biscuit”
Sep
2
comment An expression that adds little information
Are you certain of that FumbleFingers? If so, should the expression be used post mortem?
Sep
2
awarded  Self-Learner
Sep
2
comment An expression that adds little information
I'll accept your answer. Do you happen to know if there is a difference between tautology, pleonasm and redudancy? Or are they synonymous?
Sep
2
accepted An expression that adds little information
Sep
2
answered An expression that adds little information
Sep
2
comment An expression that adds little information
If it's in the context of an accident, the expression doesn't add anything to the fact that a person was instantly killed. On the other hand, saying that a person succombed to their injuries adds the information that they were still alive shortly afterwards.
Sep
2
revised An expression that adds little information
deleted 17 characters in body
Sep
2
asked An expression that adds little information
Aug
25
comment What do you call a disk with a hole in the middle?
A rounded disc (drawn by rotating a circle around a center point) being called a torus.
Aug
15
revised Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
Added an explanation to the link
Aug
15
comment Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
I learned something today :)
Aug
15
comment Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
How about, "Sisyphean as carrying out a futile task repeatedly like Sysiphus, a Greek mythological figure that was doomed to endlessly roll a boulder up a hill in Hades as a punishment for defying the gods" ?
Aug
15
suggested suggested edit on Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
Aug
15
comment Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
Would "Preaching to the choir" be considered as equivalent to "Preaching in the desert" (In French, "Prêcher dans le desert").
Aug
15
comment Is the term 'String' too jargony to use in a user interface?
Definitely too jargony as you say. A string for everyday people is still a filament made up fibrous material, not a chain of somethings. Go for text, characters/letters, words/phrase or whatever vocabulary is used for describing this to kids in schools. P.S: You should take that programming hat off every now and then ;)
Jul
31
comment Why is “great” pronounced as “grate”, but spelled with “ea”?
I may be mistaken but there seems to be a slight different in pronunciation between the two. "Grate" would be pronounced with a short sound whereas there would be more emphasis on "great". Of course, this impression could be due to emotional context or local pronounciation. Such subtle differences do exist in other languages such as French though.
Jul
3
awarded  Commentator