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Jan
27
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
25
revised What is the origin and history of the word “motherf---er”?
added 149 characters in body
Jan
25
comment What is the origin and history of the word “motherf---er”?
@Mary - Intriguing. Could you cite a reference to this Shakespearian usage please?
Jan
22
revised 'Must' & probability
added 112 characters in body
Jan
22
comment What do you call the facial expression or the state just before bursting into tears?
Similar to english.stackexchange.com/questions/251593/…
Jan
22
comment What do you call the facial expression or the state just before bursting into tears?
I'm still thinking about it, but I definitely think grimace is a bad fit here.
Jan
22
comment What do you call the facial expression or the state just before bursting into tears?
I don't think grimaced is appropriate in either of these examples.
Dec
8
answered 'Must' & probability
Oct
22
comment What is the name of a small unluxurious restaurant?
Are you from Glasgow, @shawnt00 ?
Sep
25
comment What is the name of a small unluxurious restaurant?
They said the same thing about shampoo, bungalow, verandah, pyjamas, gymkhana, jodhpurs, etc., etc. Give it time.
Sep
25
comment What do you call someone who is banned by law to leave their country? and What is the verb for banning somebody this way?
Ah yes in the that case id suggest prefixing with, respectively,. 'the subject of' or 'subject to' .
Sep
25
answered What's the word for “to do something without feeling emotional about it”
Sep
22
answered What do you call someone who is banned by law to leave their country? and What is the verb for banning somebody this way?
Sep
22
answered hiring or deployment
Sep
22
answered What is the name of a small unluxurious restaurant?
Aug
21
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
13
awarded  Yearling
Jul
24
answered Is there a term that means doing "funny hand gestures”?
Jul
1
answered An old car in bad condition
Jun
26
comment “Sorry excuse for a” VS “Sorry excuse of a”?
Well it is called 'English' you know.