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Jul
31
comment Should the phrase “Man up” be considered offensive?
It's also interestingly recursive; the people most offended by the phrase are the people the phrase applies to the most, and are also the ones creating this list.
May
16
awarded  Critic
Apr
12
comment Is there a difference between “disc” and “disk” for naming digital storage media?
So, there's no 'disc' alternative to the word 'diskette'? Is 'diskette' used in British English?
Apr
3
answered Using stressed “the” to emphasize outstanding noun
Mar
1
comment Manipulativeness of the progressive aspect in “to be wondering if”
It could be slightly manipulative, because they are actually saying is different than how they want what they're saying to be interpreted. "I am wondering if the mechanic's name is Robert" is a statement, and you would be technically justified in an answer like "oh, you are?" By phrasing it the way they did, they're requiring you to, in a very slight way, take an extra step of interpreting what they actually want, and proactively offering a solution. They probably aren't doing this consciously.
Feb
18
comment Using -ed vs. -ing in the “needs washed” construction
I'm an Oregon native, and didn't consciously realize this construct was 'incorrect' until I was in my thirties. I used it all the time growing up. My family has Scottish heritage, but has been in the states since the 1700's, and on the west coast for several generations. Interesting how such things persist.
Feb
15
comment “Astronomy images” vs. “astronomical images”
'Astronomy' is a science, and an astronomy image is an image related to that science. Pictures of a telescope, for instance, could be an image of astronomy. 'Astronomical' refers to the actual objects in space studied by astronomy. An image of a star is both an astronomy image and an astronomical image. For instance, you can have an astronomy textbook, but it isn't an astronomical textbook.
Feb
15
comment “Astronomy images” vs. “astronomical images”
A picture of a scientist sitting at a desk looking at sky charts is an 'astronomy image' but not an 'astronomical image'. Their referents overlap but aren't the same.
Feb
11
comment “Not so much” at the end of a sentence
Think of other qualifiers moved to the end of sentences. "Second one, maybe." "Second one, almost certainly." "Second one, to a degree" "Second one, if it's yellow". "Not so much" has taken on a life of it's own, but it's not unique.
Jan
24
awarded  Teacher
Jan
24
answered Another way of saying “being judged”
Jan
22
comment A word that says a person is both female and your friend
Or, the benefit of not having to clarify gender when it's irrelevant. Overall, I view this as a win for English.
Jan
11
awarded  Supporter