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seen Oct 6 at 1:28

From north-east England, currently in New Zelaand. Curious about language.


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Apr
12
comment Is “hold-your-nose (or close –your-eyes) - and-do sth” an English idiom or just a coinage for one-off use?
@FumbleFingers: You are correct, that, I think, was the original insinuation, but I think it also gets applied to other "unpleasant tasks" - perhaps in a jocular way though.
Apr
8
comment Is “hold-your-nose (or close –your-eyes) - and-do sth” an English idiom or just a coinage for one-off use?
In the UK Close your eyes and think of England would be the common phraseology
Apr
8
awarded  Critic
Mar
27
comment Is “breaths” grammatically correct?
I'd say breath and would consider this an instance of singular they.
Mar
14
comment What does “sayd” (etc.) mean in old book clipping?
I'd guess it translates directly to "toward the said merchant" - meaning aforementioned.
Mar
14
answered What's the meaning of “I put the chic in freak”?
Mar
11
comment What do you call a female that cannot stand other females?
There is nothing that says Misogyny can't apply to women.
Mar
5
answered What would be the proper abbreviation for an event that has yet occur?
Feb
25
awarded  Cleanup
Feb
25
revised Punctuating question tags: A question mark is always required, isn't it. (Well, isn't it?)
added 15 characters in body
Feb
25
revised Punctuating question tags: A question mark is always required, isn't it. (Well, isn't it?)
rolled back to a previous revision
Feb
20
comment Punctuating question tags: A question mark is always required, isn't it. (Well, isn't it?)
Sorry, but in what way can you punctuate this to unambiguously delineate all the possible meanings spoken inflection could convey? I don't think it is possible - but why would you try? Punctuation isn't the correct tool for the job in this case.
Feb
20
comment “Except for” vs. “except on”
To my British ears the first way ("I only...") sounds more natural.
Feb
20
comment What are the important differences between Canadian and American (USA) English?
@ghoppe On a slight tangent, but to satisfy my British English curiosity, how do people pronounce futile etc. in such a way as to NOT rhyme with "tile"? Similarly, how can you pronouce hoof and roof to NOT rhyme with goof?
Feb
20
answered Punctuating question tags: A question mark is always required, isn't it. (Well, isn't it?)
Feb
19
comment What word means what many people think 'ironic' means?
Ed Byrne also has a go: youtube.com/watch?v=nT1TVSTkAXg
Feb
15
comment X should have Y to Z (in the past)
I think it isn't quite right. X and Y should have killed Z to prevent Z from killing them would work? Possibly adding a time frame if it isn't clear from context (I mean, to emphasize that Z should have killed X and Y in the past)
Feb
6
answered What does “They nick the Emmy show during the Emmy show” mean?
Feb
5
answered “Dear Professor” vs “Dear Mr”: differences between British and American usage