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Apr
21
comment Madam vs. Ma'am
@MT_Head Is it helpful to be so rude? Google is comparatively young and can only base its stats on data it finds online. Unless you think it listens in to all conversations and reads all paperwork, current and historic? I stand by my original comment.
Apr
20
comment Madam vs. Ma'am
@MT_Head I've never heard anyone called 'Madam Smith' unless they happened to be French (Madame) or associated with arts such as ballet, opera etc. In everyday English usage you would not use Madam with a surname.
Apr
12
comment Americans can eat Chinese, but Chinese can't eat Americans?
@LessPop_MoreFizz Similarly in BrE the noun is implicit - Let's go for an Indian [meal] or Let's get a Chinese [takeaway].
Apr
12
comment Americans can eat Chinese, but Chinese can't eat Americans?
@prash Thanks! Enjoyed that.
Apr
12
comment Why has the word “thrice” fallen out of common usage?
@JohnLawler But what about the starring role in Macbeth? '1st witch: Thrice the brinded cat hath mewed. 2nd witch: Thrice and once the hedge-pig whined'. Incidentally I always took 'thrice and once' to mean '4 times', but if you google this, some sources have 'Thrice, and once the hedge-pig whined', which turns it into an agreement with the 1st witch. I guess this is what Shakespeare scholars spend many a happy hour arguing about.
Apr
12
answered Americans can eat Chinese, but Chinese can't eat Americans?
Apr
12
comment “corollarily” or equivalent?
Interesting, did it say how these were chosen? I don't have a problem with any of those words. On the other hand I always have to think about 'asphalt' and I avoid using 'lure' if possible!
Apr
8
comment Small change, big difference
@DoubleDouble Thank you! Glad to know I'm not going crazy.
Apr
8
comment Small change, big difference
@user58319 Ah you're so right. By the time I'd read through all the answers I'd forgotten what the OP said.
Apr
7
comment Small change, big difference
+1 for pivotal. Reminds me 'cardinal', which online dictionaries define as 'of the greatest importance: fundamental' but which my ancient, paper dictionary defines as 'pertaining to a hinge'.
Apr
7
comment Does “the N-word” have implications other than a word used for racial discrimination?
@MT_Head I was sure I had seen this on a history programme but I admit I can find no reference in a quick 10 minute search online - everything suggests D is for day, though there's lots of speculation about D for departure, decision etc. The closest I can find is this site which mentions an X day and Y day. My bad!
Apr
7
answered Small change, big difference
Apr
7
comment Tasks for tutorial class sessions, not at home
I'd go for classwork
Apr
7
comment Meanings of “in the sense that”
@DJClayworth I don't think Curris is saying that they are interchangeable. You can't begin with 'because' and replace it with 'in the sense that' in all instances. But you can substitute 'because' to help you understand the above sentences.
Apr
7
comment Derogative vs Offensive
Here we go again with anonymous downvoters. The purpose for downvoting is 'This answer is not useful'. It might not be the best answer, it might not be worthy of an upvote, but can the downvoter please explain what is so wrong with it that it's considered 'not useful'? When I rule ELU it will all be different....
Apr
7
comment Derogative vs Offensive
Potentially anyone could be offended - no one likes to be put down like that. But whether you react by bursting into tears, punching the offender, or calmly letting it wash over you is down to the individual. You say 'tried', which means it's deliberate and therefore more hurtful/annoying than if if someone thoughtlessly belittles you.
Apr
7
comment Does “the N-word” have implications other than a word used for racial discrimination?
@MT_Head Though the D in D-Day doesn't stand for day. Days A, B and C were lined up as possible days for invading Normandy but were not suitable. Conditions were right on D-Day.
Apr
7
answered Derogative vs Offensive
Apr
7
comment “Oriented” vs. “orientated”
@Mari-LouA and Tristan, I agree completely, and I wish the various commentators who say how irritated they are by this word would accept that that is not evidence for it being 'wrong'. If I hadn't read this post first I would have assumed 'orientate' was the older term which had been shortened to 'orient' in AmE - rather like Robusto saying 'as an alternate' when the proper word is 'alternative.' I think :)
Apr
7
comment regarding “Oriented” vs. “orientated”
Orientated is not an incorrect word, it is perfectly acceptable. If anything I would have thought it was the original, which has since been shortened to 'oriented'.