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Jul
24
comment Can “weren't” be used in reference to a singular noun?
@JanusBahsJacquet "When ah were a lad..." - I think the /r/ is simply because the next word begins with a vowel. I would not pronounce an /r/ in eg "I wa' going to ask you something....". That becomes even shorter - "w'goin".
Jul
19
comment A phrase describing someone who is incredibly lazy?
Bone idle (sometimes born idle)
Jul
19
comment Can “weren't” be used in reference to a singular noun?
This pronunciation is often written as "were/weren't" but I believe it's a misinterpretation and should really be written "wa'/wa'n't". As someone from Yorkshire I use this shortened form all the time but know perfectly well that the singular form is "was". Personally I say "wa/want" but I know plenty of people who lengthen it enough to sound more like "were/weren't". I don't believe there's any subjunctives or poor grasp of grammar involved, just a simple omission of the "s" - but I've no proof to back this up so I haven't put it as an answer.
Jul
17
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
17
answered What does “wont to suppose” mean?
Jul
11
answered Negative Questions:
Jul
11
comment What's an expression for a cunningly-fake friend?
You can see here - click EXAMPLE SENTENCES.
Jul
11
comment Was the BrEng term “coloured” derogatory in the 1970s?
@Mari-LouA Yes I know, I watched it. What I'm trying to say is that I think 'coloured' was the most commonly used word at that time, certainly in the area and amongst the kind of people that the show depicts, and was not necessarily offensive in itself. Like many similar epithets it could be straightforwardly descriptive, or derogatory depending on context eg 'Irish people' is OK but 'the bloody Irish' is not. You're asking whether the writers intended to shock us - perhaps they did, but if so they were mistaken IMO. This word was normal for the time.
Jul
11
answered “Milk the cow more and feed it less”
Jul
11
comment Was the BrEng term “coloured” derogatory in the 1970s?
@Mari-LouA Some answers here suggest that 'black' was becoming the preferred term in the early 1970s, but that took a long time to seep through into everyday usage. I know some older people who would still use 'coloured' or even 'negro' without any racist intent but simply because these were the words they were brought up with - MLK used both these words as respectful terms in his speeches. If this clip was historic, documentary footage I'd say definitely 'coloured' was the most commonly used word at that time, but as to what the writers believed or intended, who can say?
Jul
11
comment Is there a word for when workers raise expectations unsustainably high when they work too hard?
+1 for the expression, but not for the sentiment.
Jul
11
comment Was the BrEng term “coloured” derogatory in the 1970s?
@Mari-LouA I'm not qualified to" say whether 'coloured' was considered offensive at that time, though I certainly remember it being used. But maybe the emphasis of the question lies equally on the sexist 'bird'. Try substituting a different epithet - "A scouse/posh/Scots/fat bird with a bit of power." I think she is assuming this how she is viewed, and in her case the most commonly used word was probably 'coloured'.
Jul
11
answered What's an expression for a cunningly-fake friend?
Jul
9
comment Why is “their” italicized?
:) Italics are often used to represent words which would be emphasized in speech - it can often help to say the sentence out loud with emphasis on the italicised word.
Jul
9
answered Why is “their” italicized?
Jul
5
comment Term for 'wounded (Callus-bearing) knuckles'
If you're not looking for the term specifically for self-induced vomited you'd be unwise to use it as a generalised term for calloused knuckles.
Jul
5
comment A word relating to sad emotional drunkenness
There's also the expression 'pissed as a newt' (meaning 'drunk') which is adopted with other words to suggest that drunkenness was involved: "He was quite exuberant when he heard the news." "Oh yes, exuberant as a newt."
Jul
5
comment How to express the idea of the company I am working for and not my company?
How about 'my employers'?
Jul
4
comment Word for Secretive Marriage that is not Elope
Middle aged - why would you presume such a thing?