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23h
answered Is there a British slang word for “company man”?
1d
comment Is there a word for “false accuser”?
Sounds like Julian Assange
1d
comment Is there a negative word for an overt display of emotion?
@KristinaLopez Ah then you've never read Alice in Wonderland and the dormouse's reference to the treacle mine. What do you call treacle in the US then? We have golden syrup and black treacle (molasses) but also treacle toffee and treacle tart which I guess are made from golden syrup (which comes from sugar cane rather than maple). I think treacle must be an older word which has lingered on.
Jan
25
answered A word for a person that is expected to respond (to a message)
Jan
25
comment Is it possible for a new irregular verb to appear in English language?
I've always viewed that usage as a noun rather than a verb, ie it's not inviting you to login, it's saying 'here is the place for your login/username/password. But I repeat my first comment: if 'login' is a single word verb then a regular construction of the past tense would be 'loginned', and nobody says this. If you want to write 'loggedin' as one word that's just failing to leave a space, not creating a new verb.
Jan
25
comment Is it possible for a new irregular verb to appear in English language?
If 'login' really is used a as a single word verb (and I don't accept that it it) then the correct past tense would be 'I loginned yesterday' - and I've never heard anybody say this.
Jan
21
comment A single word to replace “cannot be determined by sight”
Your question is not clear, can you please add more detail?
Jan
18
comment Is there a British slang word for “company man”?
Could you be thinking of Jobsworth? Not really a 'company man', but definitely distinctly British.
Jan
18
comment Is there a single word to describe “acting in a way unbecoming of a parent?”
I agree with @TimWard as it depend on the kind of behaviour you mean. Sven Yarg's 'Mommy-dearest' would be an abusive parent. But perhaps you mean that parents are acting like children themselves (playing on the roundabout) or setting a bad example (rowing at school meetings). I would say they are 'not setting a good example'. But it's subjective - one parent's liberal style is another parent's lack of a firm hand.
Jan
17
answered Are there other well-known examples of the type “Illigitimi non carborundum”?
Jan
17
comment Repeated verb in a sentence?
@WS2 It's related to 'so I did' but is not a duplicate. Plenty of people use this form for emphasis but without using 'so', which seems to be a N. Irish thing.
Jan
17
comment Repeated verb in a sentence?
You might hear the first one as "You've got there some really nice thing, you have", but not as you've written it.
Jan
17
comment Soft winter OR mild winter?
I have heard the Irish refer to 'soft rain' or a 'soft day', the former with the kind of fine drizzle that gets everywhere, and the latter to a calm, quiet, mild day (wet or dry). But I don't think it would be a suitable way to describe a whole winter.
Jan
4
awarded  Yearling
Jan
2
awarded  Pundit
Oct
20
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
16
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Sep
16
answered Is this a proper way for using “providing”?
Sep
16
comment What is the name of this symbol “♪”?
@chaslyfromUK I find the closed vote hard to understand too. OP is asking for the name of something, how does that disqualify it from being about the English language?
Sep
16
answered How is one person in a set of twins referred to?