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seen Dec 20 at 7:52

Dec
17
reviewed Approve the meaning of “alloy” in Jane Austen's Emma Chapter I
Dec
17
comment A word for 'related in managerial way'
Perhaps stakeholder? - "a person with an interest or concern in something, especially a business".
Dec
17
answered Idiom: in my neck of the woods, AmE
Dec
17
comment Past verb + not
+1 Just to add, you would use this construction in poetry or in speeches or other places where emphasis is needed, but it's not used in everyday speech.
Dec
17
comment a private friend x a close friend
@Lipeandarai Perhaps you mean 'a personal friend', which is commonly used, rather than 'private'? Have you heard 'a private friend' used? 'Personal' and 'private' could both be used, for example when referring to a letter which is only for you and not for anyone else, but I agree with Colin - you would not normally hear 'a private friend' used by native speakers. You would use 'a personal friend' to indicate that you know someone - for example, you could tell someone "It's safe to buy a car from Colin, he's a personal friend."
Dec
17
comment A word for “intimate friends” without any kind of romance?
@HotLicks I have never heard it used that way, but the world is a big place :)
Dec
17
comment A word for “intimate friends” without any kind of romance?
@HotLicks Bromance is a strong friendship between men, not a man and a woman (brother/romance).
Dec
17
comment in the early January or in early January
This reminds me of American "I wrote my mother" and British " I wrote to my mother". I don't think it's something to worry about. I would write "in early January" as being more correct (to me) but would readily miss out the in when speaking.
Dec
17
comment the good guys and the bad guys
'One of us' and 'One of them'.
Dec
17
comment East Yorkshire pronunciation in the mid 20th century
David, don't doubt your memory just because it's not yet on the internet! Regional variations are legion, especially further back in time before we all became homogenised through modern media. I'm from Leeds, 1960s, and I'm sure your memory is correct, though I'm not familiar enough with IPA to 'hear' what you're saying. And the 'Teach Thissen Tyke' books are really annoying.
Dec
17
comment Graphotactics of possessive: the true reason for the apostrophe
This question makes my eyes hurt
Dec
17
answered What is a synonym for “controversial” with a more neutral connotation?
Dec
17
comment What is the meaning of “gassed for”?
I've never heard of 'gassed up', what would it mean?
Dec
17
comment What is the meaning of “gassed for”?
'Gassed for' is not an idiom, 'gassed' stands on its own as a meaning for 'given an inhalational anaesthetic'. The sentence could end after 'gassed'. The 'for' is relating to the purpose, ie 'in order that you may have oral surgery'. Compare "Soldiers were gassed in the First World War".
Dec
17
answered meaning of “fallen little short of a mother in affection” in Jane Austen's Emma, Chapter I
Dec
12
comment What is the etymology of the word “shanked”?
A shank is also the name of part of a screw, the smooth part between the head and the threaded part.
Dec
12
comment What's 'paying through the nose/ mean?
A favorite story: a private (fee-paying) school once informed all parents that fees had to be increased by £500 per annum. Unfortunately the letter was sent out with only one 'n' in 'annum'. One parent replied that he would prefer to go on paying 'through the nose' like he'd always done in the past.
Dec
12
comment Is “knob” associated with penis?
+1 but I do think it's use for penis is more common than you suggest, as well as derivatives like 'knobhead' (idiot) and other grosser words.
Dec
11
answered An exceptional sentence
Dec
11
comment What does this sentence mean generally?
This sounds a perfectly normal expression to me. I would use it to mean 'not interested in X at the moment', especially with a sense of being displeased about the thing. eg "I'm a bit off football [since it became more about money and less about sport]" or "I'm a bit off John [since he behaved like such a jerk the other day]."