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Apr
26
awarded  Famous Question
Mar
1
answered Rules on hyphenating phrases
Feb
21
comment What is the English equivalent to the Telugu proverb: “For cat, the rat is the witness”?
Hi, take a look at this similar question and see if that helps.
Feb
21
comment Meaning of “make obvious their nether bifurcation”
If you look in any dictionary for the meanings of the individual words you will understand the sentence. 'Nether' = 'lower'. 'Bifurcation' = 'branching into two parts'.
Feb
20
comment What's a single word for someone who writes literature?
And also something that includes women???
Feb
20
answered What is compared in ''than I thought''?
Feb
20
comment Number Abbreviated as “No.” followed by a Colon
I don't know how much this rule is followed, but I was told that you only use a period if you are shortening a word before its ending, but not if the abbreviation contains the final letter of the word. So - Mr for Mister, Dr for Doctor, but Rev. for Reverend and Prof. for Professor. If that's the case, 'No' does not have a period as it's short for Latin 'numero'. But you do mostly see it with a period, and I don't think this rule is something to have sleepless nights over :)
Feb
20
comment What is the difference between a Whiz deletion and using the present participle as an adjective?
@BillJ you beat me to it by 34 seconds!
Feb
20
answered What is the difference between a Whiz deletion and using the present participle as an adjective?
Feb
7
answered Is there a British slang word for “company man”?
Feb
6
comment Is there a word for “false accuser”?
Sounds like Julian Assange
Feb
6
comment Is there a negative word for an overt display of emotion?
@KristinaLopez Ah then you've never read Alice in Wonderland and the dormouse's reference to the treacle mine. What do you call treacle in the US then? We have golden syrup and black treacle (molasses) but also treacle toffee and treacle tart which I guess are made from golden syrup (which comes from sugar cane rather than maple). I think treacle must be an older word which has lingered on.
Jan
25
answered A word for a person that is expected to respond (to a message)
Jan
25
comment Is it possible for a new irregular verb to appear in English language?
I've always viewed that usage as a noun rather than a verb, ie it's not inviting you to login, it's saying 'here is the place for your login/username/password. But I repeat my first comment: if 'login' is a single word verb then a regular construction of the past tense would be 'loginned', and nobody says this. If you want to write 'loggedin' as one word that's just failing to leave a space, not creating a new verb.
Jan
25
comment Is it possible for a new irregular verb to appear in English language?
If 'login' really is used a as a single word verb (and I don't accept that it it) then the correct past tense would be 'I loginned yesterday' - and I've never heard anybody say this.
Jan
21
comment A single word to replace “cannot be determined by sight”
Your question is not clear, can you please add more detail?
Jan
18
comment Is there a British slang word for “company man”?
Could you be thinking of Jobsworth? Not really a 'company man', but definitely distinctly British.
Jan
18
comment Is there a single word to describe “acting in a way unbecoming of a parent?”
I agree with @TimWard as it depend on the kind of behaviour you mean. Sven Yarg's 'Mommy-dearest' would be an abusive parent. But perhaps you mean that parents are acting like children themselves (playing on the roundabout) or setting a bad example (rowing at school meetings). I would say they are 'not setting a good example'. But it's subjective - one parent's liberal style is another parent's lack of a firm hand.
Jan
17
answered Are there other well-known examples of the type “Illigitimi non carborundum”?
Jan
17
comment Repeated verb in a sentence?
@WS2 It's related to 'so I did' but is not a duplicate. Plenty of people use this form for emphasis but without using 'so', which seems to be a N. Irish thing.