1,306 reputation
311
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location United States
age 21
visits member for 1 year, 10 months
seen Jul 20 at 22:55

Jun
22
awarded  Constituent
Jun
22
awarded  Caucus
Mar
17
comment Grammatically correct usage
Although, if we're going to be sticklers about it, English doesn't actually have an optative mood, does it?
Mar
17
revised Grammatically correct usage
deleted 43 characters in body
Mar
17
comment Grammatically correct usage
Yeah, wow, I was clearly way too tired for this when I did it. I apologize to everyone who needed to proofread this post.
Mar
17
comment Grammatically correct usage
Yeah, you're absolutely right - the mistake was a combination of tiredness and thinking too much about greetings like "Happy Birthday, John!" Edited that part out, and also added the part about condoms.
Mar
17
revised Grammatically correct usage
deleted 1 characters in body
Mar
17
answered Grammatically correct usage
Mar
17
comment Grammatically correct usage
Holi is a specific holiday celebrated in many parts of South Asia. Actually, today is Holi. Happy Holi to you all!
Mar
15
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Mar
15
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
Perhaps I am wrong to assume that, if I were following the advice given in your answer, and if the individual in question were to state that he/she identified as gender nuetral (or a gender that did not match their sex, which I wouldn't be able to tell, anyways, if I already can't tell the gender), with a tone ranging from not-offended-in-the-slightest to completely offended... perhaps I am wrongly assuming that your advice would be to continue to avoid making a bigger deal out of it than there needs to be by choosing not to accuse them of denying their biology right then and there?
Mar
15
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
Well clearly not everyone is going to agree with me, and it's silly to assume they would. However, I would not use your answer as definitive proof, on the basis that I am one of the individuals that upvoted your answer, because I think, frankly, it does adequately cover the situation, whether you like it or not. I upvoted your answer, actually, as opposed to this one, on the basis that pussy-footing around the question is potentially far more offensive than asking it outright and apologizing later if need be. I agree, no more attention should be brought to it than absolutely necessary.
Mar
15
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
@EricWilson Not really. The fact that sexually ambiguous individuals exist necessitates that they be considered in any comprehensive question regarding the identification of an individual as male or female. An individual with an ambiguous voice may have an ambiguous body type, and often this compounds the issue. Any answer which fails to address this possibility does not adequately address the question of how to politely ask about a person's gender. Because whether you consider it "pandering" or not, these people do exist, and one of them might be the one to which you must ask this question.
Mar
15
comment What does “Faustian bargain” mean?
Yeah, while I think we can all agree that Mephistopheles is, objectively speaking, quite fun, I disagree with @Malvolio on the assertion that the focus is on the second party. Wouldn't the phrase be "Mephistophelian Bargain"? A "Faustian Bargain" is a criticism primarily of the metaphorical "Faust" in the scenario; to say that someone has made such a bargain is to say that the individual is someone who is some combination of greedy, lazy, shortsighted, and, frankly, dumb, to agree to the terms of a transparent deal that is not just lopsided, but that can realistically be called a total loss.
Mar
15
revised What does “thanks for sharing” mean?
clarify meaning
Mar
14
comment Word for energyless-ness
In this case, fatigue is your best fit.
Mar
14
revised What does “thanks for sharing” mean?
clarification
Mar
14
comment “on active service” vs “in active service”
Interesting. Perhaps there's a regional factor? Perhaps I'm just in a sort of bubble with that specific usage? I don't know, I just don't recall ever seeing "on" used in that particular situation (not that my own personal anecdotal evidence is really evidence of anything, of course). Perhaps I just haven't noticed it... in any case, +1'd.
Mar
14
comment “on active service” vs “in active service”
As I commented on the response of @FumbleFingers, I believe the AmE usage has more to do with viewing "in active service" as a state of being, whereas "a mission" or "a tour of duty" necessitates denotatively (by the definitions of the words mission and tour) that the individual travel – so the same convention is used as in "going on a trip".
Mar
14
comment “on active service” vs “in active service”
While this has little impact on the frequent usage of "in" by Americans, I'd be interested to see how many of the "on" usages are excerpts taken horribly out of context (e.g., "... torture methods used on active service members..."). Based on personal experience, I'd say that the AmE convention is to use "in active service", as "active service" is a state of being that is defined by being in combat (OP's preferred usage) rather than by traveling, whereas we would say "on" when travel is made explicit by word choice (e.g., "on a tour of duty"; "on a mission"; "on a journey/trip"; etc.).