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seen Oct 29 at 19:53

Jan
2
awarded  Yearling
Jan
17
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
15
awarded  Commentator
Jan
15
comment What is the class of things that includes “new” and “existing”?
I know what you meant, but it's not a disadvantage of using a term like "status" (or, more often, "status id" with a key to a separate table). It's common to see such things when one has more than a boolean type of field, i.e. one which has or may come to have more than two discrete possible values. You're right that more than one field might indicate a status on the same record, but that would mainly occur when the record participated in more than one well-defined but separate processes.
Jan
15
awarded  Quorum
Jan
14
revised “He is me” — is this grammatical?
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Jan
14
comment What is the class of things that includes “new” and “existing”?
I'm not downvoting your answer, but would note that 1) nobody would ever name a database field "pre-existence" or any variation thereof, 2) the correct naming, if it were chosen, would be "is pre-existing" with a value indicating truth or falsity for a particular item, and 3) status tracking is common in databases, especially if more statuses are to be added later-- it's not "generic" in a bad way, but often just proper design.
Jan
14
revised What is the class of things that includes “new” and “existing”?
added 236 characters in body
Jan
14
answered “He is me” — is this grammatical?
Jan
14
answered What is the class of things that includes “new” and “existing”?
Jan
13
answered Can “conceived” be used as “assumed”?
Jan
13
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
13
awarded  Cleanup
Jan
13
revised When is an example not an example?
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Jan
13
revised When is an example not an example?
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Jan
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
13
answered When is an example not an example?
Jan
13
answered About adjective possessive pronouns
Jan
13
answered What does “his A and C” mean?
Jan
11
revised Is there an idiom that corresponds to the Hungarian expression “fall off the other side of the horse”?
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