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location Charlotte, NC
age 54
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen 2 days ago

Contract financial developer at a large bank in Charlotte, NC.


Apr
14
comment Is “paraphrased” the correct way to express an attributed quote with known origins?
I'm have a hard time reconciling quote marks with the word "paraphrased." Quote marks signal to the reader that Joe said what's in between the quotes, word for word. As the reader absorbs the quote issuing from Joe's lips, the added "paraphrased" puts doubt in the reader's mind, and weakens the impact of your writing. (What did Joe really say? Is the writer injecting his thoughts and attributing them to Joe?)
Apr
14
comment Is “paraphrased” the correct way to express an attributed quote with known origins?
I think the OP is looking for a standard for paraphrases, not the class.
Apr
4
comment In the context of cooking, what is the difference between “flipper” and “spatula”?
I held up a rubber scraper and a pancake turner and asked my teenager daughter (raised in the South to Northern parents) to name them. She called them a spatula and a flipper. I was quite surprised that word she proffered for the latter was one that I had not heard before this question was posed.
Apr
4
comment In the context of cooking, what is the difference between “flipper” and “spatula”?
No criticism, Bradd, but I wanted to let the question mellow for a day before upvoting any answer. I have not heard "fish slices." I am not the baking authority, but I thought of the spatula for spreading the base layer of frosting or fondant and the palette knives for applying the decorative aspects.
Apr
3
answered In the context of cooking, what is the difference between “flipper” and “spatula”?
Apr
2
comment What's an adjective that means “has high expectations”
+1 back at ya. These are all positive connotations. Much nicer to say you're meticulous or painstaking, while your detractors are saying you're anal or picky.
Apr
2
answered What's an adjective that means “has high expectations”
Mar
26
answered If a person holds prejudice against people because of their nationality, would that be considered racist?
Mar
24
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Where to place the word shop, in the extract below. A question of grammar, or are both correct?
Mar
21
answered What is the small room most businesses have at their entrance called?
Mar
19
answered Aren’t there English equivalents to Japanese word, Senpai (先輩) meaning a senior in school, career, or age?
Mar
14
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Order of “not” with infinitive
Mar
13
comment How to say this using catch-phrases: “Test A requires a lot of tissue samples, whereas test B doesn't.”?
I understand that for certain organ biopsies that several sites of the organ are sampled. Since your patients are already in the OR, maybe your proposed test is less destructive. And (guessing here) recovery should be faster and pain should be lessened from one biopsy instead of five.
Mar
13
comment How to say this using catch-phrases: “Test A requires a lot of tissue samples, whereas test B doesn't.”?
OK, that helps. I was imagining a needle biopsy.
Mar
13
answered How to say this using catch-phrases: “Test A requires a lot of tissue samples, whereas test B doesn't.”?
Feb
27
comment Why is a cup of coffee referred to as a cup of “Joe”?
Yes, @KristinaLopez, standing on the shoulders of giants is the best I can brew in my currently decaffeinated state. GI Joe, Average Joe... that's my story, and I'm stickin' to it.
Feb
27
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Why is the word 'Hello' used frequently when starting a phone call?
Feb
27
comment Is “Discrete” the correct/best term?
The sidebar information for the wiki page is a summary, an overview, or a fact sheet. I think you could the tabs summary/detail, overview/descriptive, or fact sheet/long form.
Feb
27
revised Why is a cup of coffee referred to as a cup of “Joe”?
Added World Wide Words reference (which was the source material for the cited Snopes reference)
Feb
27
answered Why is a cup of coffee referred to as a cup of “Joe”?