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Apr
27
answered “… multiple of **the** Lebesgue measure.” vs “… multiple of Lebesgue measure.”
Apr
26
comment “… multiple of **the** Lebesgue measure.” vs “… multiple of Lebesgue measure.”
My stochastic calculus teacher would say "...multiple of Lebesgue measure." She would also say, "Here we must use the Lebesgue integral" (to distinguish it from a Leibniz/Newton integral).
Apr
26
comment Is it appropriate not to capitalize “I” if i personally view it as vanity on cultural grounds?
Perhaps you might consider writing your own name in lowercase, as did the poet e e cummings. (He may have done it for humility or for orthography; see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E._E._Cummings#Name_and_capitalization.)
Apr
19
comment Is there an English word for a feeling of impending doom or dread
"I have a bad feeling about this." starwars.wikia.com/wiki/I_have_a_bad_feeling_about_this
Apr
7
revised Word for a real-time counter of something
spelling and format changes
Apr
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
24
answered Appropriate comma usage when demonstrating two different words that describe something
Mar
23
comment What does 'odds' mean in 'overcome the odds'?
You are welcome. You may have heard about a popular book series, the Hunger Games. Here is a phrase spoken to the young candidates: "May the odds be ever in your favor." The odds were against almost all candidates, as only 1 of 23 would survive the fight to the death. The heroine, Katniss Everdeen, was able to overcome the odds (by surviving).
Mar
23
answered What does 'odds' mean in 'overcome the odds'?
Feb
23
revised A verb for making a new component work for the first time
added finesse
Feb
23
answered A verb for making a new component work for the first time
Feb
20
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
5
answered Word choice for a comparison of different amounts
Feb
5
comment Word choice for a comparison of different amounts
Agreed, we need more context for the sentence. One might rephrase differently for a statistical or machine learning paper versus one on developmental vocabulary.
Feb
2
comment What do you call a person who makes easy things difficult?
You might want to reference a Rube Goldberg machine, such as teachengineering.org/collection/cub_/lessons/cub_images/… .
Jan
29
comment What part of speech are “plus”, “times”, and “minus”
@DanielR.Collins I'm not sure why "As a mathematician" you could consider "three and four" to be linguistically incorrect. Yes, it is still done in elementary schools, but it is hardly an abuse. You may as well heap scorn on Danny Kaye and Sesame Street for the Inchworm song: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inchworm_(song). Let's sing it together... "Two and two are four / Four and four are eight"
Jan
29
comment What part of speech are “plus”, “times”, and “minus”
Not that ngram closed any arguments, Daniel, but please take a look at this graph: books.google.com/ngrams/… . "Two plus two" didn't arrive on the scene until after 1900. However, "two and two" has endured.
Jan
26
reviewed Reject Is there a term for words that have a single meaning or are only used in a single context?
Jan
25
comment The film [that/which] I selected for viewing
Wow, thanks for that award!
Jan
24
comment The film [that/which] I selected for viewing
Sorry, SAH, I can't see it. Could I suggest that you bring this up in meta (meta.english.stackexchange.com)?