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1h
answered Can “rentee” be used to refer to one who rents an item?
Jul
26
comment Objects which are badly described by their names
"Koala bears," "military intelligence," "governmental efficiency," "China Lake." The list goes on.
Jul
26
comment Objects which are badly described by their names
OK, please see this list of misnomers at forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst9108_List-the-misnomers.aspx. "Guinea pig," "Panama Hat," "jellyfish,"
Jul
26
comment Objects which are badly described by their names
Good point. Added two brief lists in my answer.
Jul
26
revised Objects which are badly described by their names
added a list
Jul
26
answered Objects which are badly described by their names
Jul
16
comment Subjective General Knowledge
I'm leaning toward your second meaning. I agree that the first meaning is specific to a population, and might not been know by all of that group. Some aspects of advanced calculus (e.g., tensors) would not be known to all math professors. This is quite specific knowledge that, say, a math professor of linear algebra would have been exposed to but would not necessarily be conversant.
Jul
16
revised Lax or lenient?
Small typo. Changed "it's primary application" to "its primary application."
Jul
16
comment Word to explain “the exact required quantity” neither too much nor too little
Your question makes it sounds like the quantity is tangible and measurable, such as "2 liters of gas" or "1 cup of white flour." In these cases, one might say (for a fluid) "2 liters, to the drop"; or (for a dry measure used in cooking) "a level cup." But your example is centered around details, which are not measurable, quantifiable, or exact. In particular, one man's scant narrative may be another man's TMI (Too Much Information).
Jul
16
comment Word to explain “the exact required quantity” neither too much nor too little
When a witness is being sworn in, he affirms that he will tell "the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth." If only truth were quantifiable...
Jul
15
revised Term for composing/melodizing a fictional song
Italicized some titles and broke out Tone Poem / Symphonic Poem
Jul
15
answered Term for composing/melodizing a fictional song
Jul
15
comment Can you give me examples to differentiate “oxymoron”, “paradox” and “irony”?
A paradox would be something that is contradictory, such as a bank that has no money. Paradox also has a logical sense to it, such as identical twins, one of whom is an astronaut who travels at near-light speeds for a time and returns to earth younger than his earth-bound twin. (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twin_paradox) Oxymoron is an expression that is contradictory, like MrHen's "wise fool." Irony usually deals with incongruous emotion (feeling elated when someone else suffers or dies) or meaning (Britain's biggest dog being named "Tiny" (literarydevices.net/irony).
Jul
15
comment Can you give me examples to differentiate “oxymoron”, “paradox” and “irony”?
Could you give us the dictionary definitions that you're using and perhaps explain why you're confused? I rather like MrHen's definition of these three at english.stackexchange.com/a/164193/3306.
Jul
7
comment Idiom for someone who buys all the best gear to do something before they even have a basic proficiency?
I've heard this as, "Big hat, no cattle"; urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=big+hat%2C+no+cattle
Jul
5
answered Someone who knows he is too small to change politics, but still wants to fight
Jun
30
revised How do you hyphenate 'day to day'?
Split out contrasting example and corrected a typo in the last sentence.
Jun
30
answered How do you hyphenate 'day to day'?
Jun
30
comment How do you hyphenate 'day to day'?
Welcome to EL&U. What has your research turned up?
Jun
29
comment What is the meaning of “ Milk doesn't sit with me well”?
To "not sit well" is always idiomatic, as it never refers to how something is sitting. Milk or another beverage can never sit. Neither can a situation be placed into a seated position. When someone says a food or drink does not sit well, they are substituting a euphemism for an explicit word like gas, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. It is more indirect and polite to say to a host, "Milk does not sit well with me" or "Milk does not agree" with me instead of "Milk makes me vomit."