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answered What is the word for someone who wants to fight against politics but he knows he is too small for that and he can not change anything?
Jun
30
revised How do you hyphenate 'day to day'?
Split out contrasting example and corrected a typo in the last sentence.
Jun
30
answered How do you hyphenate 'day to day'?
Jun
30
comment How do you hyphenate 'day to day'?
Welcome to EL&U. What has your research turned up?
Jun
29
comment What is the meaning of “ Milk doesn't sit with me well”?
To "not sit well" is always idiomatic, as it never refers to how something is sitting. Milk or another beverage can never sit. Neither can a situation be placed into a seated position. When someone says a food or drink does not sit well, they are substituting a euphemism for an explicit word like gas, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. It is more indirect and polite to say to a host, "Milk does not sit well with me" or "Milk does not agree" with me instead of "Milk makes me vomit."
Jun
29
revised What is the meaning of “ Milk doesn't sit with me well”?
Added a usage example. Reworded the case the OP specified.
Jun
29
answered What is the meaning of “ Milk doesn't sit with me well”?
Jun
29
comment What is the meaning of “ Milk doesn't sit with me well”?
It would be helpful to tell us what your research has turned up on the phrase and to post that research. (Further, your title asks for an exact meaning, while your question asks for an idiom. Did you want both?)
Jun
26
comment What does “over” mean in this question?
If you were outside playing, I suppose your mom would ask you to "come in for dinner." If you were unconscious, the nurse's aide could ask you to "come to for dinner." If you were a cheap brother-in-law, your wife might ask you to "come through for dinner."
Jun
25
answered A word for someone who intentionally makes vague negative comments and then refuses to explain them
Jun
25
answered What does “over” mean in this question?
Jun
25
revised “Order of magnitude” for qualitative changes
gave another example. Corrected reference link.
Jun
25
answered “Order of magnitude” for qualitative changes
Jun
24
comment “Order of magnitude” for qualitative changes
I agree your assertion to the contrary: "saying that an NP problem is an 'order of magnitude' harder than a P problem is well defined." But I commonly hear "order of magnitude" used to describe problems that are difficult to quantify, despite its very scientific-and-accurate sound. When someone says, "It's an order of magnitude more difficult to fly a plane than to drive a car," they are not saying that you have 10^3 versus 10^2 rules to remember or 2^4 versus 2^3 things to check before you depart. The phrase is being used for a qualitative change, not a well defined quantitative one.
Jun
5
comment Trix from Latin
Silly Robusto. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trix_%28cereal%29
Jun
3
comment what is the opposite of “appreciate”?
Good question, Edwin. Some of the antonyms fit well, some less so. I would not say "you have the right to decrease it"; neither "you have the right to overlook it." The OP seemed to require a little direction.
Jun
3
answered what is the opposite of “appreciate”?
May
16
answered What's an idiom or word or name for an initial tester?
Apr
26
comment Is there any scenario, situation, or way to make “doing something selfishly” have a positive connotation?
Good point. The invisible hand of enlightened self-interest will cause one to price his goods and services so as to maximize his revenue. While it can have a negative connotation of personal selfishness, it also bears the positive connotation of increasing societal good.
Apr
24
answered a better alternative for “computerize”?