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Aug
20
answered What would I call this computer science dilemma?
Aug
20
comment SWR for “just now”, “from my hand”, lost an object?
There is a citation; the word "sublimation" is a link to the Free Dictionary. I even quoted the definition of interest to avoid link rot and keep the reader here. I'm also wondering about the downvotes. I don't think it's the lack of citation that's causing people to downvote.
Aug
20
comment Word/phrase/allusion for spreading false intel to catch a mole
Not surprising that the Spy Master, le Carré, would end up taking a part of these answers.
Aug
20
comment SWR for “just now”, “from my hand”, lost an object?
Just so. From iain-banks.net/us/the-hydrogen-sonata : "Now they've made the collective decision to follow the well-trodden path of millions of other civilizations; they are going to Sublime, elevating themselves to a new and almost infinitely more rich and complex existence."
Aug
20
answered Word for “the capacity of habituating to new environment”
Aug
20
comment Word/phrase/allusion for spreading false intel to catch a mole
The email example in the OP's second paragraph is planting true intel as those are actual email addresses. They are not disinformation, per se.
Aug
20
answered Word/phrase/allusion for spreading false intel to catch a mole
Aug
20
answered SWR for “just now”, “from my hand”, lost an object?
Aug
17
answered Term for noise shoes make when filled with water?
Aug
6
comment A word or term to describe a person who feels pleasure in picking on one's skin
Can the pleasure be from a sense of completion? If so, it might be in the realm of OCD. Th\is pleasure would be qualitatively different from how most of the population senses pleasure, say, from toweling off wet skin or rubbing moisturizer onto sunburned skin.
Aug
3
comment Can “rentee” be used to refer to one who rents an item?
I would agree that lease and rent are different terms. But the mechanism and the parties are the same. alephzero's last link makes a distinction based on the term. Again I agree: If you rent a car, it is for days or possibly weeks. If you lease a car it is for months and possibly years. But I disagree that the terms lessor and lessee are not appropriate, @DanHenderson. You'll find lessor and lessee and both rental agreements and leases. You won't find rentee on one and lessee on the other. You'll find lessee on both.
Aug
3
answered Can “rentee” be used to refer to one who rents an item?
Jul
16
comment Subjective General Knowledge
I'm leaning toward your second meaning. I agree that the first meaning is specific to a population, and might not been know by all of that group. Some aspects of advanced calculus (e.g., tensors) would not be known to all math professors. This is quite specific knowledge that, say, a math professor of linear algebra would have been exposed to but would not necessarily be conversant.
Jul
16
revised Lax or lenient?
Small typo. Changed "it's primary application" to "its primary application."
Jul
16
comment Word to explain “the exact required quantity” neither too much nor too little
Your question makes it sounds like the quantity is tangible and measurable, such as "2 liters of gas" or "1 cup of white flour." In these cases, one might say (for a fluid) "2 liters, to the drop"; or (for a dry measure used in cooking) "a level cup." But your example is centered around details, which are not measurable, quantifiable, or exact. In particular, one man's scant narrative may be another man's TMI (Too Much Information).
Jul
16
comment Word to explain “the exact required quantity” neither too much nor too little
When a witness is being sworn in, he affirms that he will tell "the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth." If only truth were quantifiable...
Jul
15
revised Term for composing/melodizing a fictional song
Italicized some titles and broke out Tone Poem / Symphonic Poem
Jul
15
answered Term for composing/melodizing a fictional song
Jul
15
comment Can you give me examples to differentiate “oxymoron”, “paradox” and “irony”?
A paradox would be something that is contradictory, such as a bank that has no money. Paradox also has a logical sense to it, such as identical twins, one of whom is an astronaut who travels at near-light speeds for a time and returns to earth younger than his earth-bound twin. (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twin_paradox) Oxymoron is an expression that is contradictory, like MrHen's "wise fool." Irony usually deals with incongruous emotion (feeling elated when someone else suffers or dies) or meaning (Britain's biggest dog being named "Tiny" (literarydevices.net/irony).
Jul
15
comment Can you give me examples to differentiate “oxymoron”, “paradox” and “irony”?
Could you give us the dictionary definitions that you're using and perhaps explain why you're confused? I rather like MrHen's definition of these three at english.stackexchange.com/a/164193/3306.