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May
10
comment I want to write there is a large quantity of people. Which of these is the correct form?
I'm a native speaker, and agree. "There are a large quantity/number of people" is incorrect because there's one quantity/number, whereas "there are lots of people" is fine, because in this case it's the people that there are lots of, not the quantity or number.
Dec
30
awarded  Yearling
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
10
comment A little brain fart
I call it a brain burp.
Sep
10
answered Is there a single word for “login/register”?
Aug
9
comment Responding to a poor question
I disagree with tit for tat; it has overtones of retaliation for a malicious deed, which doesn't fit the context of a poor question, since most such aren't deliberately so.
Jul
4
comment “Is it just me or does this annoys you?” Please show me whats the mistake in this sentance
(tchrist is saying that annoy and annoys are different conjugations rather than different tenses.)
Jul
4
comment If Atheism is the rejection of all deities equally what is the polar opposite?
I know a number of people who consider themselves agnostic, but not atheistic. They believe that they don't know or that they can't know, and see that as a different position to atheism (which they equate with your gnostic atheism). Tangentially, the word "Gnosticism" was used for a particular form of religeous belief argued against in some of the New Testament letters in the Bible.
Jul
4
answered “Is it just me or does this annoys you?” Please show me whats the mistake in this sentance
Jul
2
comment Theorem about uniqueness of solution
@Sinusx Correct - the adjective cannot alter the English structure of that sentence, but will alter whether we use "a" afterwards. We can't say "a unique solution" more than once unless we change which equation we're talking about: "This has a unique solution. A solution is given by M(t)=..." feels wrong. It should be "This has a unique solution. The solution is given by M(t)=...".
Jul
2
revised Theorem about uniqueness of solution
Why does "a unique solution" appear more often than "the unique solution"?
Jul
2
answered Theorem about uniqueness of solution
Jul
1
comment degrees of temperature and humidity
"Moist" seems quite a mild word compared to "humid", but I've not thought of a better one. "Saturated" might be a firmer word but does sound rather formal and may be inappropriate from a physics point of view.
Jun
27
comment Which does English “l” and “r” sound come under, an allophone or different phonemes?
@JanusBahsJacquet and FumbleFingers Hehehe oops. I've always pronounced thither with an initial θ and second ð, but I see that my OED disagrees with me and uses ð! Bad example then! I was doubly right to remove it.
Jun
27
comment Which does English “l” and “r” sound come under, an allophone or different phonemes?
@FumbleFingers Your thigh vs thy example thoroughly convinces me that the two th sounds are different phonemes which share a representation, so I've removed it.
Jun
27
revised Which does English “l” and “r” sound come under, an allophone or different phonemes?
deleted thither on the grounds that thy and thigh show that the two copies of th are different phonemes
Jun
27
answered Which does English “l” and “r” sound come under, an allophone or different phonemes?
Jun
27
comment Word meaning 'common line of reasoning for a given issue'.
The word theory would fit there, but is more general than just a line of reasoning.
Jun
27
comment Use “of” or “for” with Institute, Department, Office…?
Largely of makes more sense, but for is often used (in the UK government). If you're naming a government website, go look it up on their webpage. If you're naming departments within your own organisation, I'd go with of.
Jun
25
comment Conundrum: “cleverer” or “more clever”, “simpler” or “more simple” etc
@NeilCoffey The other processes of language change provide the exceptions to the rules. The origins can sometimes determine the general pattern, as they do in this case.