184 reputation
117
bio website
location California
age
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Sep 24 at 21:41

Sep
24
comment Is the phrase “it's just a matter of semantics” meaningless?
It is really rather stupid to say that a reference to Wikipedia automatically invalidates everythign. When I cite Wikipedia, I am making a point that I believe is correct and credible. At the same time, I want to give credit where it is due, and it would be improper to take a quote without giving credit. While Wikipedia is not 100% correct, it is nevertheless remarkably reliable and a very useful source. If you believe that everything in Wikipedia is 100% wrong, you live in a very strange personal universe and probably should be locked up.
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
27
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
22
awarded  Famous Question
Mar
1
awarded  Teacher
Jan
2
comment Who ''coined'' the term “scare quotes,” and why is the word “scare” used?
Would it be a separate question if I wanted to know more about the gesture of forming those quotes in the air as you speak?
Jan
2
comment Who ''coined'' the term “scare quotes,” and why is the word “scare” used?
I always thought the implication was more about irony, than anything else. Ironic ideas don't often strike me as scary.
Oct
23
awarded  Supporter
Sep
18
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
11
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
16
accepted Is the phrase “it's just a matter of semantics” meaningless?
Jan
14
comment Is this sentence semantically correct?
An alternative conversion to parallel grammar: "He enjoys skiing, playing the guitar, hiking, and wild living." :-)
Jan
11
answered Is the phrase “it's just a matter of semantics” meaningless?
Jan
10
comment Is the phrase “it's just a matter of semantics” meaningless?
@BillFranke let take the marriage/civil union argument a bit further. Say that I argue in German, and you argue in French. Clearly we are using different words. Can we say the difference is "just semantics"? Either we have a difference in meaning (and should not be trivialized) or we mean the same thing, in which case there is no difference. We argue about phrasing and how we say it -- that is clear -- but if we argue about meaning, then the use of the word "just" seems wrong. (Hope I am not being too dense here, I am just not quite getting it.)
Jan
10
comment Is the phrase “it's just a matter of semantics” meaningless?
Hmmm. if those wedded to objective theory "only care about the words being used", wouldn't that be a matter of terminology? Why would they say it is a matter of semantics? I would think that semantics is the meanings behind the words.
Jan
10
asked Is the phrase “it's just a matter of semantics” meaningless?
Dec
29
awarded  Scholar
Dec
29
accepted For the verb 'focus' why is the gerund form 'focusing' with a single S, instead of 'focussing' with a double S?
Dec
29
awarded  Student
Dec
29
asked For the verb 'focus' why is the gerund form 'focusing' with a single S, instead of 'focussing' with a double S?