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location United States
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visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Jul 11 at 21:43

Jun
16
asked Where did the phrase “shut up” as an expression of disbelief or amazement originate?
Jun
13
comment Using apostrophe when abbreviating “recommendations” as “reco's”
They're were too improper apostrophe's inn frame six. :)
Jun
3
awarded  Talkative
Jun
2
revised Word for resembling the truth
greatly changed format, added links, made the usage clear
Jun
2
revised Word for resembling the truth
deleted 90 characters in body
Jun
2
revised Word for resembling the truth
added a link to the definition of the word; deleted 12 characters in body
Jun
2
answered Word for resembling the truth
May
30
comment “They had whatted the car?”
+1 for the point about saying close to the original. I'd apply this to the noun form of the question.
May
28
comment Is cruel standard use as a noun in poetry? Are there terms for non-standard English specifically in regard to use in poetry?
@Ceberus: It had occurred to me also that the vowel sounds could have changed over the years or that English accents vary, so they may still rhyme in some areas. My question was somewhat influenced by my recollection of a scene in Educating Rita imdb.com/title/tt0085478 in which Rita's teacher used a word that she understood as getting the rhyme wrong, which fits for both assonance and consonance. In the example of come-one-home, I may be mixing examples where they wouldn't have been originally together. I don't have a specific quote for that set. Semi-assonance works for me.
May
28
accepted Is cruel standard use as a noun in poetry? Are there terms for non-standard English specifically in regard to use in poetry?
May
28
comment Is cruel standard use as a noun in poetry? Are there terms for non-standard English specifically in regard to use in poetry?
ev'n and heav'n don't actually share the same vowel sound, but an approximation that apparently is nevertheless assonance. Thanks for the poetry lesson.
May
27
asked Is cruel standard use as a noun in poetry? Are there terms for non-standard English specifically in regard to use in poetry?
May
26
answered “True” is to “false” as “truth” is to… what?
May
24
comment What makes “like” and “so” popular?
Did you already see Wikipedia on this? I realize it only partially answers the question. Usage is at least as old as 1928 and has been used in cartoons and songs. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Like#In_slang_and_colloquial_speech
May
16
accepted Guidelines for the use of the slang term “cise”
May
16
revised Guidelines for the use of the slang term “cise”
added 18 characters in body
May
15
awarded  Nice Question
May
14
comment Guidelines for the use of the slang term “cise”
The similar use to "to hit someone up with" from the first linked blog helps greatly. Thank you.
May
14
revised Guidelines for the use of the slang term “cise”
improved formatting, clarified question; edited title
May
14
asked Guidelines for the use of the slang term “cise”