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Jun
18
accepted *Getting on one's nerves*, *last nerve* or *third nerve*?
Jun
17
comment Can “shop” (related to selling or stores) be used as a transitive verb?
Online stores have tabs for shop kitchen supplies and the like but I haven't heard the format of shop Walmart spoken. However, it is highly similar to the format: let's eat Subway (or insert other restaurant), which I hear often and at which I cringe. Let's go shop Walmart (meaning let's go shop at Walmart) may be moving into common usage. (I'm a Native American English speaker.)
Jun
17
comment Where did the phrase “shut up” as an expression of disbelief or amazement originate?
This explains part of the question, but I also wondered about the country of origin. I'll probably choose this answer if I don't find out anything about the country of origin.
Jun
17
comment How to use “text” as a verb
+1 for an eloquent and thorough answer.
Jun
17
comment *Getting on one's nerves*, *last nerve* or *third nerve*?
@Robusto I didn't know that, but it could be why my friend used the term if she was familiar with the malady.
Jun
17
asked *Getting on one's nerves*, *last nerve* or *third nerve*?
Jun
17
comment Is there an English phrase for an inability to actually *leave* already?
+1 @Alenanno for mention of that book. @Martha, I'm worse than my folks, but I think I may have learned it from my grandmother who was often at our house. I'd be interested in how to avoid falling into the long goodbye pattern.
Jun
16
comment Where did the phrase “shut up” as an expression of disbelief or amazement originate?
@MrHen Did Elaine use the phrase? I may be the only American who didn't watch Seinfeld. Would you say it's as much in use in the USA as in Britain? @The Raven and @Charles I've heard it with the pause but didn't notice the inflection on the second word. Thanks.
Jun
16
awarded  Commentator
Jun
16
comment Where did the phrase “shut up” as an expression of disbelief or amazement originate?
The ironic use traces as far back as the 1870s, but that doesn't seem to answer the question of where its use to express disbelief or amazement originates.
Jun
16
asked Where did the phrase “shut up” as an expression of disbelief or amazement originate?
Jun
13
comment Using apostrophe when abbreviating “recommendations” as “reco's”
They're were too improper apostrophe's inn frame six. :)
Jun
3
awarded  Talkative
Jun
2
revised Word for resembling the truth
greatly changed format, added links, made the usage clear
Jun
2
revised Word for resembling the truth
deleted 90 characters in body
Jun
2
revised Word for resembling the truth
added a link to the definition of the word; deleted 12 characters in body
Jun
2
answered Word for resembling the truth
May
30
comment “They had whatted the car?”
+1 for the point about saying close to the original. I'd apply this to the noun form of the question.
May
28
comment Is cruel standard use as a noun in poetry? Are there terms for non-standard English specifically in regard to use in poetry?
@Ceberus: It had occurred to me also that the vowel sounds could have changed over the years or that English accents vary, so they may still rhyme in some areas. My question was somewhat influenced by my recollection of a scene in Educating Rita imdb.com/title/tt0085478 in which Rita's teacher used a word that she understood as getting the rhyme wrong, which fits for both assonance and consonance. In the example of come-one-home, I may be mixing examples where they wouldn't have been originally together. I don't have a specific quote for that set. Semi-assonance works for me.
May
28
accepted Is cruel standard use as a noun in poetry? Are there terms for non-standard English specifically in regard to use in poetry?