Reputation
1,126
Top tag
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
3 19
Newest
 Custodian
Impact
~25k people reached

1d
comment Opposite of “depends on”
Downstream packages depend on things further upstream.
2d
comment “Thirty times weaker”: Using a multiplier to describe the lack of something
I would have thought that something can only be thirty times weaker than something that is quantifiably weak. It is not the same as being one thirtieth the strength. If someone needs to get one more point to win a game, and I need five more, my position is five times weaker, not one fifth as strong.
2d
comment Why does the meaning of a root sound different than the root?
As-salamu alaykum @Mitch
2d
comment Academic writing Photo or Photograph
Given the context, photograph seems better, if only to help eliminate any casual tone.
2d
comment Why does the meaning of a root sound different than the root?
They're not all Latin. If you're just making up words, I don't understand the question. Just pick a bunch of random noises and put them in rows. Blumfinich krargum mukashakalah.
2d
comment Is there any saying or idiom to describe the opposite of “blessing in disguise”?
@TusharRaj - Let it go. Giving away millions of dollars is not a blessing, it's an act of charity. It may be a blessing for the people receiving the benefits. If they were fed, but then it turned out the food was rotten, and they all died of food poisoning, that'd work, but that's not blowback. And your other suggestions were equally poor, but had already been commented on. Genuinely, I'm not going to respond to this thread anymore. All the best for the next question dude.
2d
comment Why does the meaning of a root sound different than the root?
To help with constructing a convincing language for a fantasy world, if you haven't already, spend some time reading J.K. Rowling. She has a gift for doing what you're trying to do when she comes up with names for magical spells. You can probably get all you need from just reading the fan wikis.
2d
comment Is there any saying or idiom to describe the opposite of “blessing in disguise”?
Yes. But one that appeared to be a blessing, but that was a curse in disguise. And please don't shout at me.
2d
comment Is there any saying or idiom to describe the opposite of “blessing in disguise”?
Blowback just generally refers just unforeseen, unwanted consequences of your own actions. Blowback does not appear to be a blessing. None of the examples really fit the actual question. This answer just goes off on its own tangent.
2d
comment Is the sentence; 'Can people stop inviting me to play games I don't want to.' grammatically correct?
Hey @Inquiring, welcome to Stack Exchange. Check out our sister site, English Language Learners. It's much better suited to this kind of question. ell.stackexchange.com
2d
comment Can't remember the word for indicating different options
Hey @exs, welcome to the network. We have a sister site, English Language Learners, that would be a much more appropriate place for these kinds of questions: ell.stackexchange.com .
2d
comment Formal way to say “I believe”
A few words you could use with this approach: Convincing, compelling and persuasive. They all imply that the author believes the researcher, without implying that anything is definitely true.
May
23
comment A word to describe a London projects dweller
Yeah, there are a lot of slightly wealthier people, who do the whole Burberrys and gold chain thing, and get called chav as well. But they're just another side of it, kind of like posh wannabes. Still, if you asked someone what's the UK word for somebody with low income, who often gets in trouble with law enforcement and probably wears sportswear on any occasion, they'd say chav more often than not.
May
23
comment Is there a word for an idea similar to negative evidence?
+1 for a given. That should be the top answer.
May
23
comment A word to describe a London projects dweller
Most chavs do wear a lot of gold, if they can afford it. If you asked someone in the UK, what are chavs into, then gold jewellery, sportswear, Staffordshire Bull Terriers, drugs, booze and crime would generally be the answer.
Dec
19
comment “White lie” as in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time?
This is the closest answer. It was a lie by omission, but also a white lie. The lie wasn't intended to deceive, so much as protect the father from undue concern. You can have white lie by omission, you just wouldn't call it that.
Dec
13
comment Is “denigrate” a racist word?
The black is bad, white is good thing is basically pagan. Primitive people saw the days and the seasons as caused by a dualism. The Sun represented light, warmth and new life, the Moon darkness, cold and death. White represents light, and black darkness.
Dec
11
comment “Omni-relevant” alternative?
General or generic?
Dec
9
comment Is “I'd've” proper use of the English language?
Would of is total nonsense. People pronounce it that way, but it is always a contraction of would have.
Dec
9
comment Comma splice question
It's not a comma splice, no. The second part is not a valid sentence.