794 reputation
213
bio website twitter.com/__carlsmith__
location Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
age 35
visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen Sep 23 at 12:34

I'm into pretty much anything creative, mainly software, art and writing. My traditional spaces are Python and the Cloud, but have been getting more and more into hacking browsers over the last few years.

For food, I build web apps, mostly on App Engine.

I also try and do my bit for free software and the docs, trying to get more people into CoffeeScript at the moment.


May
29
comment Does “so called” have a negative connotation in English?
+1 To say "so called" implies, at least in modern usage, that the thing is called that, but it's not exactly accurate.
Apr
2
comment Why do I want to say “the iPhone” instead of just “iPhone”?
Without Jobs, you'd be lucky to find an iPhone 6 up their sleeve.
Apr
2
comment What would be a word for describing a tendency to take the literal meaning of words above the accepted meaning?
A phobia is an irrational fear or dislike. You don't need to fear homosexuals to hate them.
Mar
27
comment Is “jipped” a politically incorrect word?
I added a comment to the question, so wont repeat it here, but jipped and jewwed have totally different meanings.
Mar
27
comment Is “jipped” a politically incorrect word?
Jip, in the UK, generally means to antagonise, as in "He gave the police some jip". It doesn't mean to rip somebody off, so it isn't equivalent to "Jewwed".
Mar
27
comment Is “jipped” a politically incorrect word?
Gypsy is not, in any way, a pejorative racial term. In fact, it is the term that Gypsies use to describe themselves. Pikey is a racist term.
Feb
19
comment What term means “the sum of a person”?
@user867 Point taken, but still, the question has a list of six loosely related items, even more loosely described as the sum of a person, and asks for a single word to describe all this. I didn't downvote it, but thought it was an ambiguous question that's impossible to improve.
Feb
17
comment What term means “the sum of a person”?
The question can not be answered precisely as it assumes things which aren't true. Few people would consider the 'sum of a man' to include his memories for example.
Oct
13
comment Why are commas needed in the following sentences?
Probably quoting a tabloid. The people that read those things would really appreciate the author having done the math for them. In the original, it probably came with a pie chart.
Oct
13
comment Why are commas needed in the following sentences?
+1 The sentences are grammatically correct, and I thought the commas felt right there, where zpletan would omit them. Commas are often required, but are often personal preference.
Oct
13
comment Can we accept such words as 'invite' when used as a noun in correct English?
This is getting silly. Let's move on people.
Oct
13
comment What is the noun for “marks you make on your book”?
I'm with Janus.
Oct
9
comment Are there counterpart English expressions to Japanese proverb, "the nail that pops up is always hammered down?
It strange our parents teach us that the bigger you are, the harder you fall, while our governments teach us that some banks are too big to fail. - J Celente
Aug
11
comment What's a clinical or all encompassing term for whether a person is alive or dead?
You should move this to EL&U. They'll love this question.
Jul
20
comment Neutral term for a person in the same organization
I apologise. I just thought it was a confusing example that made it difficult to understand what type of organisation it was.
Jul
20
comment Does calling an app “the Instapaper” with a definite article suggest a non-technical speaker?
Personally, I'd drop the capital when using the word as a common noun. "I just read a tumblr."
Jul
20
comment General Party Secretary of the CCP, Xi Jinping, called for the revival of the Chinese spirit
What's wrong with saying "Secretary Bob called" anyway?
Jul
20
comment General Party Secretary of the CCP, Xi Jinping, called for the revival of the Chinese spirit
Your answer redefines the question. You can not remove parts of a sentence and expect it to work the same way. The sentence "US President, Barack Obama, says..." is not the same as "US President says". No one is confused by the "sheer volume of words". You're confused by the words you've chosen to remove.
Jul
20
comment Why is “ain't” not listed in dictionaries?
Everyone here, including the dictionaries quoted, seems to include the apostrophe, but I think it's becoming more common to just write aint.
Jul
20
comment Are there counterpart English expressions to Japanese proverb, "the nail that pops up is always hammered down?
There's also "shy kids don't get sweets", which pretty much means the same thing.