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Jul
23
comment Where did the practice of using apostrophes for possessive nouns but not pronouns originate?
Good point. There are always edge cases. I don't have a problem with ones own voice, but you're right; conventionally, you must write one's own.
Jul
23
revised Where did the practice of using apostrophes for possessive nouns but not pronouns originate?
deleted 24 characters in body
Jul
23
comment In the given sentence, is the article ''an'' needed or not?
OK, fair enough.
Jul
22
comment In the given sentence, is the article ''an'' needed or not?
Calling my comment rhetoric is a bit unfair. I was just saying that nothing can be essential and useless, and that it's generally a bad idea to use ten words, when three would do the same job.
Jul
22
comment In the given sentence, is the article ''an'' needed or not?
You do not need it, no. You could remove a lot of those words, and should remove useful, as everything essential is useful. People know that a computer is a device too. You could just write... Computers are essential. Also, this question would be a much better fit for English Language Learners.
Jul
22
comment Single word for frequently reassessing a task or situation
It's often achieved by polling, but that's not quite what you asked for.
Jun
4
comment What is the origin of the word “Latin”?
al Lat is an ancient Arabian goddess, and is mentioned in the Quran[53:19], and the Hadith in relation to the Satanic Verses. She was part of a trinity of sorts.
Jun
4
comment Is there a Germanic word for the Latin “number”?
To be clear, I'm not super committed to defending this line of reasoning. It just seemed like it'd make an interesting comment. I still think there's some truth to what I said, but I haven't given it enough thought to be sure, and certainly not enough to argue the point.
Jun
4
comment Is there a Germanic word for the Latin “number”?
@PatrickKelly - It's not really to do with initialisation, though I get what you're saying there. It's just that a number, as an abstract concept, is something very different to an amount. We agree on that, but I'm suggesting [only suggesting] that while people may have named some of the common amounts [the low and round numbers], like a dozen, a score or a hundred, they'd still lack the concept of numbers proper, so they wouldn't have a word for that idea. I'd expect 'amount names', including common fractions, and words like tally, but not a word that describes integers, reals etc.
Jun
4
awarded  Quorum
Jun
4
comment Is there a Germanic word for the Latin “number”?
The conceptual difference lies in nothing being the lowest amount you can have; no amount can be less than nothing. Zero is just a number, like -1 is just a number, on an infinite line. If you replace the absence of something (a null value) with 0, you'll mess up even basic arithmetic, like finding a mean. The OP makes it clear that they believe "something as simple as a word for the thing you count with should exist in any language with counting", which is overly simplistic. A word meaning amount should exist, but a word meaning number would not.
Jun
4
comment Is there a Germanic word for the Latin “number”?
Tale here describes a tally, which is only a number if you conceptualise it as being one. Prior to mathematics, a tally would be an amount, not a number. See my comment on the question.
Jun
4
comment Is there a Germanic word for the Latin “number”?
It's worth considering that, in simple terms, prior to their invention by the Arabs, and our adoption of them during the Enlightenment, Westerners never had numbers. We could count, but counting only gives you an amount, and from amounts rise fractions, but until you have conceptual distinction between nothing and zero, you do not have the concept of numbers, only amounts, which can be expressed with numerals. On that basis, I assume there will be no original Germanic word for numbers in the modern sense.
Jun
2
comment What is a word that describes when someone requires a certain quality of another person in order for them to be a possible dating option?
"It's also a Slang term."
May
31
comment Name for DIY Electronics as a hobby
They are called makers: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maker_culture
May
26
comment Opposite of “depends on”
Downstream packages depend on things further upstream.
May
26
answered “You look good. The last time I seen you, you looked terrible, your head was busted in and —”
May
26
comment “Thirty times weaker”: Using a multiplier to describe the lack of something
I would have thought that something can only be thirty times weaker than something that is quantifiably weak. It is not the same as being one thirtieth the strength. If someone needs to get one more point to win a game, and I need five more, my position is five times weaker, not one fifth as strong.
May
26
comment Why does the meaning of a root sound different than the root?
As-salamu alaykum @Mitch
May
25
comment Academic writing Photo or Photograph
Given the context, photograph seems better, if only to help eliminate any casual tone.