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seen Jan 12 '13 at 14:48

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11
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
30
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
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awarded  Notable Question
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awarded  Popular Question
Jan
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comment Meaning and sentence structure of “Why would we have thought otherwise?”
thanks for your answer. So it is a question in conditional perfect form without explicitly specifying the if-clause, right? Is it grammatically correct to not specify the if-clause in these sentences?
Jan
6
accepted Meaning and sentence structure of “Why would we have thought otherwise?”
Jan
6
comment Meaning and sentence structure of “Why would we have thought otherwise?”
@Nile - is "why did we think otherwise" grammatically correct? Since "did" is in the past tense I used "thought" (past tense of think).
Jan
6
revised Meaning and sentence structure of “Why would we have thought otherwise?”
added 43 characters in body
Jan
6
asked Meaning and sentence structure of “Why would we have thought otherwise?”
Dec
31
comment “Either your dog or your cat eats” vs. “Either your dog or cat eats”
@FumbleFingers - thanks for the info. I didn't know the grammar rules around this so I posted the question.
Dec
31
accepted “Either your dog or your cat eats” vs. “Either your dog or cat eats”
Dec
30
comment “Either your dog or your cat eats” vs. “Either your dog or cat eats”
Please post a comment on why this question is down voted so that I can improve my future posts. I'm honestly trying to learn and don't mean to post useless questions here.
Dec
30
asked “Either your dog or your cat eats” vs. “Either your dog or cat eats”
Dec
30
awarded  Commentator
Dec
30
comment the narrator keep trying vs. the narrator keeps
it would be great if people tell why they are down voting -- the feedback will help me to improve my future posts.
Dec
30
revised the narrator keep trying vs. the narrator keeps
added 59 characters in body
Dec
30
comment the narrator keep trying vs. the narrator keeps
@Kris- I quite didn't get your comment. Wouldn't it be still "keeps" even if the editor is to convey that the present tense is to be substituted for the past?
Dec
30
accepted the narrator keep trying vs. the narrator keeps
Dec
30
comment the narrator keep trying vs. the narrator keeps
@MετάEd - FYI, added the citation in the main content.
Dec
30
revised the narrator keep trying vs. the narrator keeps
added 88 characters in body