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1d
comment Why should the first person pronoun 'I' always be capitalized?
[contd.] For that reason, it is always better to use a graphic to represent specific letterforms. Also, your explanation would be more complete, if you explained that the dotless ME i could be confused with the strokes of m, n or u, because the form of these letters was different from the form we use today, too. And you might want to illustrate the problem, by showing that in ME handwriting the word "minim" looked like "ıııııııııı". Which is wrong, because the illustration lacks the connecting strokes. And what you write is beginning to be quite different from what you claim you are writing.
1d
comment Why should the first person pronoun 'I' always be capitalized?
@Cerberus If you want to show the form of a single letter and add that it "looks somewhat like" the Unicode dotless i, I see no problem. But you need to remember that you are (a) relying on the look of a specific font and the letter might look quite unexpectedly in another font that is installed on the machine of a user browsing this site, and (b) text on the internet is processed by automated processes like search engines or read by blind readers, both of which will find your claim that the ME "i" looks like the Turkish "ı" quite baffling. [contd.]
1d
comment Why should the first person pronoun 'I' always be capitalized?
@Cerberus The Middle English handwritten (dotless) "ı" was a typographic variant of the dotted "i", much like the double-storey "a" and single-storey "ɑ" are not different letters, but the same letter in different fonts. The dotless "ı" in Unicode on the other hand is not a variant of "i" but a different letter with a different pronunciation. It does not exist in English, but in Turkish, where the capital version of "i" has a dot as well: "İ". See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dotted_and_dotless_I So do not use the Unicode U+0131 to represent ME handwriting.
Mar
11
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
24
comment Should I capitalize the starting sentence after a greeting that ends in a comma (e.g. “Hello,”)?
@choster What's not perfect about this answer? I think it is great. +1
Nov
24
comment Should I capitalize the starting sentence after a greeting that ends in a comma (e.g. “Hello,”)?
@Jon Nice, but please note that the Pope is not a native speaker of English and probably doesn't use British or American conventions to style his letters (if he writes in English at all).
Aug
30
accepted Name for fine hair on human skin
Aug
21
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
29
comment Is the term intellectual effrontery still in use? Does it sound clunky or stilted?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not about writing but reading.
Apr
20
accepted Shake 'em on down
Apr
20
comment Shake 'em on down
Wow, now that's an answer! Wonderful. Thank you :-)
Apr
17
answered Shake 'em on down
Apr
17
asked Shake 'em on down
Apr
8
comment When to use “nude” and when “naked”
@emory But "naked" in your examples clearly signifies a deviation from the normal. You are naked under the shower or for a phyisical, but not elsewhere. A nudist on the other hand is naked everywhere. And he is not called a "nakedist" for just that difference in meaning.
Mar
24
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
22
awarded  Yearling
Dec
18
revised Name for fine hair on human skin
added 391 characters in body
Dec
10
revised What do you call an unexpected combination of words?
added 460 characters in body
Dec
10
comment What do you call an unexpected combination of words?
@Josh61 Readers of fantasy fiction – while they know that no "stone of tears" or "other wind" exist in their own reality, and before they read those books and understand what those terms apply to in their respective fictional universes –, most certainly do not perceive these titles to be nonsensical, but expect them to be meaningful. So quite obviously, some other principle must be at work here.
Dec
10
awarded  Nice Question