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12h
comment An adjective or noun for someone who “has a lot of gall”?
The word "gall" ain't bad. If you're feeling particularly loquacious, you might consider saying, "He's got the unmitigated gall to ________." Don
12h
comment An adjective or noun for someone who “has a lot of gall”?
Or, "You've got brass balls!" Don
12h
comment An adjective or noun for someone who “has a lot of gall”?
Or, "He's got--ahem--brass balls"! I learned that one in Brooklyn, New York, and the sentence described the behavior of an employee who left for lunch several minutes earlier than everyone else (BEFORE lunchtime), daily! Don
Jul
28
comment Should I place a comma or “and” between the adjectives “frequent” & “new”?
@ԱստղիկԹեհլերյան: Don't mention it. My pleasure. Don
Jul
24
comment Should I place a comma or “and” between the adjectives “frequent” & “new”?
@ԱստղիկԹեհլերյան: Here are some suggested sentences: "If you choose to renew your profile, you may do so from the admin panel by yourself, once every 20 hours. With certain paid options, however, you may choose to receive frequent and automatic renewals from our system in four-hour intervals." Don
Jul
24
comment Does it make sense to say “someone is the reason and purpose for me of doing something?”
@Robusto: Point taken. Had I been crafting an answer instead of just a comment, rest assured I woulda come up with 20 different ways of saying pretty much the same thing. Ideation is second nature to me. (That and five bucks will get you a coffee at Starbucks! Although, my ideation did come in handy many years ago when I was a-learnin' my university students.) Don
Jul
23
answered Can you say: “I wanted to ask, so I could know..”
Jul
23
answered Is there a term denoting the writing of words using numbers instead of letters?
Jul
23
comment “He weeps at school.” and “He weeps in school.” are both alright and the same meaning?
There is very little difference between the two sentences. Each is correct. The sentences as they stand, however, could use a context. For example, you could say, "He weeps in school, he weeps in church, and he weeps in virtually any location in which he feels uncomfortable." Or you could say, "He weeps at school whenever he feels anxious about a test he is taking, and he weeps at church when he takes communion." ("Communion" is a religious ceremony which is sometimes called "the Lord's Supper" or "The Eucharist.")
Jul
23
comment Does it make sense to say “someone is the reason and purpose for me of doing something?”
I am uncomfortable with saying "Joe Blow is my purpose for writing"; it just does not sound right. Usually, a purpose is linked to a pre-determined outcome, as in "My purpose was to help Joe Blow." Now if you were to say "Joe Blow is my reason for writing," the sound of the sentence is much better, and in essence you are paying Joe Blow a compliment. In other words, if it weren't for Joe Blow, you would never have written your dissertation.
Jul
23
answered Should I place a comma or “and” between the adjectives “frequent” & “new”?
Jul
22
revised “Success”, “Failure” and what's in-between?
excised unnecessary word
Jul
21
revised “Success”, “Failure” and what's in-between?
punctuation
Jul
21
answered “Success”, “Failure” and what's in-between?
Jul
20
answered What's the meaning of the term “out of touch intellectuals”?
Jul
16
answered Is there a phrase for someone being ashamed of, or self-conscious about their accent when moving to another region?
Jul
16
revised Is there a phrase for someone being ashamed of, or self-conscious about their accent when moving to another region?
cleaned the question up a bit
Jul
16
answered Does this sound confusing?
Jul
15
answered How to translate the modern use of dutch term 'strippenkaart'
Jul
15
comment How to translate the modern use of dutch term 'strippenkaart'
Also, a "punch card" is not paid for in advance; it allows you to pay as you go. Don