5,471 reputation
316
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location Pittsburgh, PA
age 63
visits member for 1 year, 3 months
seen 1 hour ago

For the last 56 years, I have been a practicing Christian (liberally conservative and evangelical). Should any posting I make to any Stack Exchange website pique your curiosity as to the what and why of my beliefs, feel free to communicate with me at drlarter@yahoo.com. I do not claim to have all the answers--let alone all the questions(!), but I would consider it a privilege to discuss Christianity with you in a rational and civilized fashion.

My wife (a native Egyptian and Christian) and I have been married over 40 years. We have two grown children who have flown the coop, making us empty nesters.

I have a Master's degree in Speech Communications and three years of doctoral studies in Rhetorical Theory at the University of Pittsburgh. After a brief stint as a teacher of public speaking, I embarked on a couple of different and totally divergent pursuits by owning and operating two small businesses.

Tired of being in business for myself, I went back to school at Duquesne University's Paralegal Institute in Pittsburgh, where I was certified recently as a paralegal. I am currently looking for employment in that field, and would like to round out the last stage of my work life in some area of jurisprudence.

A rhetorical perspective is almost as natural to me as breathing. Overt and covert attempts at persuasion, whether written or spoken, are my legitimate targets for analysis, evaluation, and criticism. Of particular interest to the EL&U web site contributors would be, with some adaptations and modifications, the traditional canons of speech: style (elocutio), invention (inventio), organization (dispositio), memorability (memoria), and delivery (pronuntiatio or actio) .


1d
comment Two terms showing perceptible difference in comparison owing to triangle in the sentence
I've edited your posting for better clarity. If I have failed to do so, feel free to revert to your original version. Along with commenter Elliott Frisch, I think the two sentences seem to mean the same thing, although Edwin Ashworth thinks they do not. Perhaps he "read your mind," thinking you meant to word your first sentence as follows: He loves you more than she [loves you]. Is that it?
1d
revised Two terms showing perceptible difference in comparison owing to triangle in the sentence
reworded for better clarity
1d
comment Gramatical correctness of a sentence from To Kill A Mocking-Bird
I'm with Edwin Ashworth. I'da put "built in spite of them" in italics. The sentence as is, however, scans just fine. Evidently for you they did not. As I am wont to say, "There's more than one way to swing a dead cat." Heck, if I'da been the author, I'da worded things as follows: "Another courthouse was built around them (really, in spite of them)." Then again, I'm not Harper Lee!
Apr
14
revised Is there any word alternative for “compared to”?
added a word
Apr
13
answered Is there any word alternative for “compared to”?
Apr
11
revised Fixing a series of loose sentences: Strunk & White
minor tweak
Apr
11
comment Fixing a series of loose sentences: Strunk & White
@PeterShor: Yeah, I too prefer "gave." Thank you! Don
Apr
11
answered Fixing a series of loose sentences: Strunk & White
Apr
11
answered Relaxed Pronunciation
Apr
8
comment Thanks for having me
Or, "Thank you for interviewing me."
Apr
7
answered “Having to” usage
Apr
7
comment probable word over-use in an introductory clause
The English language, I am told, has more words than any other language on earth. Over a million. Consequently, there is bound to be more than a little redundancy in virtually every sentence we English speakers utter or write. To me, one of the most irritating sentences is the following: "First of all, I would like to thank my mom and dad for encouraging me to . . .." Why not, "First: thanks, mom and dad, for encouraging me to . . ."? Sixteen words versus nine words. Then again, who's counting?
Apr
7
revised probable word over-use in an introductory clause
cleaned it up a bit
Mar
31
answered “Preventing downtime and faults IS/ARE crucial”
Mar
26
comment “To tame” for “to cultivate [vegetables, a land, etc.]” and “to domesticate (or farm) [poultry, fish, etc.]” in AmE
@FumbleFingers: Actually, I needed a smiley face! Why am I so paranoid, you may ask? Cuz I recently got kicked off (suspended from) another SE website for a week. Guess I said something they considered politically incorrect--at least according to their relativistic criteria. (I don't sound very repentant, now, do I?!).
Mar
26
revised “To tame” for “to cultivate [vegetables, a land, etc.]” and “to domesticate (or farm) [poultry, fish, etc.]” in AmE
corrected a slip of chauvinism
Mar
25
comment “To tame” for “to cultivate [vegetables, a land, etc.]” and “to domesticate (or farm) [poultry, fish, etc.]” in AmE
@FumbleFingers: Mea culpa. Mea maxima culpa. The Atlantic Ocean is indeed a very thin line of separation vis a vis our common language. Again, forgive my chauvinism. Whether BrE or AE, our common language is indeed very accommodating to metaphors. Don
Mar
25
comment “To tame” for “to cultivate [vegetables, a land, etc.]” and “to domesticate (or farm) [poultry, fish, etc.]” in AmE
@Jim: I spoke both rashly and politically incorrectly (see comment by FumbleFingers, above). Mea culpa. Mea maxima culpa. As per your comments, yes, I have heard that usage of "tame," and yes, it sounds right to me, a Yank. As per FumbleFingers, I'll address a comment to him, to his face (as it were).
Mar
25
comment “To tame” for “to cultivate [vegetables, a land, etc.]” and “to domesticate (or farm) [poultry, fish, etc.]” in AmE
Your last two senses of "tame" are not common to AE, at least the AE I speak! Now if you're talking about the proprietor of a pet store who sells tame (or tamed) critters which are normally vicious toward humans, well . . ., that's a horse of a different color (so to speak!).
Mar
25
answered “To tame” for “to cultivate [vegetables, a land, etc.]” and “to domesticate (or farm) [poultry, fish, etc.]” in AmE