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Aug
24
comment What's it called in english to be cautious about something you do?
How about the word "careful"?
Aug
24
revised Is there a word for a 'person who likes bubbles'?
I made the question a little more understandable, I think!?
Aug
24
comment Is there a word for a 'person who likes bubbles'?
Uh, Lawrence Welk? Or how about Don Ho, the singer of that song "Tiny Bubbles"? Don
Aug
22
answered Comma Confusion
Aug
22
comment Adjective meaning 'interesting, but not relevant'
@dwjohnston: "Prosaic" needn't mean dull. Dull is but one legitimate use for the word. Prosaic can also mean routine, ordinary, matter-of-fact, marginally interesting, or unimaginative, for starters. Don
Aug
22
answered Adjective meaning 'interesting, but not relevant'
Aug
22
comment I need help with comma with conjunction
@michael_timofeev: Lighted or lit: which is correct? Both! See this web site: grammarist.com/usage/lighted-lit. See also this ngram entry: books.google.com/ngrams/…. Don
Aug
18
comment I need help with comma with conjunction
Yes, it is an independent clause. The sentence, in my opinion, is not a good one. It lacks clarity. A better rendering could be, "Birmingham lit a runaway fuse, and demonstrations exploded all over the country as fast as the headlines could record them." (At 2AM, that sentence is the best I can come up with!)
Aug
14
revised Is “screw you” an example of a performative utterance?
added a significant word
Aug
14
comment Is “screw you” an example of a performative utterance?
@oerkelens: Again, I'm saying you are at least partially right. On the motive/attitude/speech-act side of things, however, the "Screw you!" epithet contains a sentiment, just as the longer version (viz., "I hereby say, 'I screw you!'") does. How "screwing someone" demonstrates contempt and perhaps some sort of humiliating domination (e.g., rape), I can well imagine. True enough, saying "I hereby say 'I screw you'" is not the act, but it could be an incipient act which leads to an actual act, under the "right" circumstances. Am I splitting hairs? Probably. Don
Aug
13
comment Is “screw you” an example of a performative utterance?
@oerkelens: You may be right. However, the process of communication is pretty darn complex, and a great deal occurs when we open our mouths to speak. In a sense (but only in a sense), all language is performative in some way. Consider Kenneth Burkes "take" on all speech as an act by an agent through an agency (speech, for example) in an environment or scene. The speech-act is purposive and can be fraught with attitude, which is a sort of incipient act, or precursor to an act. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dramatism.
Aug
13
answered Is “screw you” an example of a performative utterance?
Aug
10
comment Difference between “just a minute” and “just a second”
@HotLicks: Good point. Myself, I lean more toward "Just a minute" than "Just a second." As Fred Astaire put it, "You like potato and I like potahto, You like tomato and I like tomahto; Potato, potahto, tomato, tomahto! Let's call the whole thing off! But oh! If we call the whole thing off, Then we must part. And oh! If we ever part, Then that might break my heart! So, if you like pajamas and I like pajahmas, I'll wear pajamas and give up pajahmas. For we know we need each other, So we better call the calling off off. Let's call the whole thing off!" Don
Aug
10
comment Difference between “just a minute” and “just a second”
@Elia: Thanks for noticing. Yeah, for a Ph.D. you'd expect at least one footnote! Guess I'm getting a little careless in my dotage. (I'm 65.) Don
Aug
10
comment Difference between “just a minute” and “just a second”
@Centaurus: Thank you, thank you very much. (How's my Elvis impression?) Don
Aug
10
revised Difference between “just a minute” and “just a second”
tidied
Aug
9
revised Difference between “just a minute” and “just a second”
tidied
Aug
9
answered Difference between “just a minute” and “just a second”
Aug
9
comment What do you call someone who does not appreciate a beautiful garden?
A herbicidal/ichthyical/hydrological/ornithological maniac? Just think of those poor koi, fountains, lanai benches, flowers (cum hummingbirds), flowering trees, and trellised vines! The oaf must be shot, forthwith. Don
Jul
31
comment An adjective or noun for someone who “has a lot of gall”?
The word "gall" ain't bad. If you're feeling particularly loquacious, you might consider saying, "He's got the unmitigated gall to ________." Don