7,515 reputation
426
bio website none
location Pittsburgh, PA
age 64
visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen 2 days ago

For the last 57 years, I have been a practicing Christian (liberally conservative and evangelical). Should any posting I make to any Stack Exchange website pique your curiosity as to the what and why of my beliefs, feel free to communicate with me at drlarter@yahoo.com. I do not claim to have all the answers--let alone all the questions(!), but I would consider it a privilege to discuss Christianity with you in a rational and civilized fashion.

My wife (a native Egyptian and Christian) and I have been married over 41 years. We have two grown children who have flown the coop, making us empty nesters.

I have a Master's degree in Speech Communications and three years of doctoral studies in Rhetorical Theory at the University of Pittsburgh. After a brief stint as a teacher of public speaking, I embarked on a couple of different and totally divergent pursuits by owning and operating two small businesses.

Tired of being in business for myself, I went back to school at Duquesne University's Paralegal Institute in Pittsburgh, where I received a General Practice Certificate last December (2013). I am currently looking for employment in that field, and would like to round out the last stage of my work life in some area of jurisprudence.

A rhetorical perspective is almost as natural to me as breathing. Overt and covert attempts at persuasion, whether written or spoken, are my legitimate targets for analysis, evaluation, and criticism. Of particular interest to the EL&U web site contributors would be, with some adaptations and modifications, the traditional canons of speech: style (elocutio), invention (inventio), organization (dispositio), memorability (memoria), and delivery (pronuntiatio or actio) .


Jan
27
answered What do you call one who has been challenged?
Jan
13
comment What can be used as formal euphemism of “hack”?
Well, you could call your sleight of hand an "ad hoc" solution to a pressing problem. "Ad hoc" is a fairly neutral-sounding term which implies you did what you had to do given the exigencies of the situation.
Jan
12
comment Above and beyond
If I'm not mistaken, I think you're missing a conclusion. Don (I didn't downvote you, by the way.)
Jan
12
answered What do you call people who are constantly moving [i.e., “in motion”]?
Jan
12
comment What can be used as formal euphemism of “hack”?
If I understand your question, your company had to resort to "sleight of hand" to solve a problematic issue. (I'm not sure how the word "otherwise" fits in your question.) In other words, the ends (viz., resolving a problematic issue) sometimes justifies the means (viz., sleight of hand), and you need a euphemism other than "hack"?
Jan
11
comment “Food for thought” in a word
@Qaz: good point. Sorry I took so long to get back to you! Don
Jan
4
revised Other words for or similar to synecdoche
minor rewording, again
Jan
3
revised Other words for or similar to synecdoche
minor change of wording
Jan
3
answered Other words for or similar to synecdoche
Dec
30
answered Is there an adjective for someone who has a “sense of entitlement”?
Dec
28
comment Is there a better way to structure a sentence with two separate points?
In addition to @rustytuba's nine suggestions, I'll add a tenth, which includes sentential syntax: "I improved the usability of the company's website and, what's more, I optimized its rendering speeds." Don
Dec
28
comment Is there a better way to structure a sentence with two separate points?
Great minds think alike, evidently. Since you've duplicated my tack (in other OPs' questions, that is), I'll not provide an answer to this OP's question. I will, however, make a tenth suggestion (you provided nine), which includes sentential syntax: "I improved the usability of the company's website and, what's more, I optimized its rendering speeds." Don
Dec
25
comment What are the Differences in Meaning Between “Problem Solving” and “Solving Problems”
"He loves nothing better than problem solving; or, "He loves nothing better than solving problems." Each sentence says pretty much the same thing.
Dec
23
comment How well does my second sentence connect with the first one?
@JoeBlack: Now that you've edited your posting, I realize your exemplar sentence was about you! In that case, I kind of like the feel of my sentence (with a change in pronouns), "Doing an excellent job is, to me, my greatest reward." Putting the "to me" in the body of the sentence is a rhetorical flourish in the family called sentential. That means you interrupt a sentence's normal syntax and in so doing draws attention (in your case) to both "excellent job" and "greatest reward" in a way that normal syntax does not. Don
Dec
23
revised How well does my second sentence connect with the first one?
minor pronoun changes
Dec
22
answered How well does my second sentence connect with the first one?
Dec
22
awarded  Yearling
Dec
22
comment Difference between an “issue” and a “challenge”
@Marthaª: I stand corrected! By the way, my dear wife, who is well over 50 years old (don't ask how well), has a history of fighting tooth and nail against the push for her to use a PC, an iPod, or any new-fangled electronic gadget. I'm thankful that in recent months there's been a bit of softening on her part. Who knows, maybe in a few years she'll be shooting off emails by the score every day! (I doubt it.) Don
Dec
21
comment introduce a restrictive clause without using that
@JoeBlack: I'm with you. The sentence "John's treatment included medicines . . ." cannot be misconstrued, in my opinion, having as it does its subject, "treatment"; its verb, "included"; its object, "medicines"; and its modifiers, both "John's" and "under development in the research lab." As such it's a well constructed, perfectly understandable sentence. Don
Dec
20
answered Difference between an “issue” and a “challenge”