8,037 reputation
426
bio website none
location Pittsburgh, PA
age 64
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen yesterday

For the last 57 years, I have been a practicing Christian (liberally conservative and evangelical). Should any posting I make to any Stack Exchange website pique your curiosity as to the what and why of my beliefs, feel free to communicate with me at drlarter@yahoo.com. I do not claim to have all the answers--let alone all the questions(!), but I would consider it a privilege to discuss Christianity with you in a rational and civilized fashion.

My wife (a native Egyptian and Christian) and I have been married over 41 years. We have two grown children who have flown the coop, making us empty nesters.

I have a Master's degree in Speech Communications and three years of doctoral studies in Rhetorical Theory at the University of Pittsburgh. After a brief stint as a teacher of public speaking, I embarked on a couple of different and totally divergent pursuits by owning and operating two small businesses.

Tired of being in business for myself, I went back to school at Duquesne University's Paralegal Institute in Pittsburgh, where I received a General Practice Certificate last December (2013). I am currently looking for employment in that field, and would like to round out the last stage of my work life in some area of jurisprudence.

A rhetorical perspective is almost as natural to me as breathing. Overt and covert attempts at persuasion, whether written or spoken, are my legitimate targets for analysis, evaluation, and criticism. Of particular interest to the EL&U web site contributors would be, with some adaptations and modifications, the traditional canons of speech: style (elocutio), invention (inventio), organization (dispositio), memorability (memoria), and delivery (pronuntiatio or actio) .


Mar
19
answered What is a “good stop gap”?
Mar
16
comment Meaning of the phrasal verb “divert from”
Or, "crowd, whose attention was momentarily diverted from the threatening gunfire . . .."
Mar
16
comment 'Boring' is to 'bores' as 'tedious' is to what?
To you, something tedious is a tedium. In other words, you find a tedious action to be a tedium. Sorry, you can't say "It tedes me"! (Well, strictly speaking you can, but most folks won't understand you.). I think you can also say that you find--or have found--something (fill in the blank) to be a tedium.
Mar
13
revised Chose best passive/active voice… 1. They greet me cheerfully every morning. a. Every morning I was greeted cheerfully. b. I am greeted cheerfull
erratum
Mar
13
comment Specific word for quick and short reminders
@HotLicks: Again, "Wucka wucka!" Don
Mar
13
comment What is the word that means an “unanswerable question”?
@HotLicks: Wucka wucka! (as Fozzy Bear would say!). Don
Mar
13
comment Word for a person who brings a guest
@HotLicks: Softening "escort" to "escorted by" would solve the connotation problem, yes?
Mar
13
answered Chose best passive/active voice… 1. They greet me cheerfully every morning. a. Every morning I was greeted cheerfully. b. I am greeted cheerfull
Mar
12
comment “The man in glasses” or “The man with glasses”?
Don't know about spectacles or specs, but I've heard people referring to glasses--particularly reading glasses--as "cheaters." Don
Mar
12
comment Word for person who loves to share knowledge
@Pacerier: Yes. I'd say it's a metaphorical synonym. Jesus, for example, was a fountainhead of both knowledge and wisdom, and he evidently loved spilling over, as it were, into the lives of others with what he called "living water." See John 4:10 ff., and 7:37-38. Part of his modus operandi was to tell stories about people with whom his audience could identify and draw spiritual lessons from. He called these stories, "parables" (literally, "words alongside," which underscores the importance of applying his words to our lives by laying his words alongside our lives & then applying them). Don
Mar
12
revised Word for person who loves to share knowledge
errata
Mar
4
comment Portmanteau components to the word Dramedy
Whatever happened to "tragi-comedy," as in "The whole sordid affair was one big tragi-comedy of errors." Don
Mar
2
comment Is there a suitable antonym for 'Achilles heel'?
Impenetrable/impenetrability, or invincible/invincibility, or inviolable/inviolability? Don
Feb
28
answered in 5 minutes, after 5minutes
Feb
28
comment “I'm not sure if I said…”
Or, "I'm not sure whether or not I said goodbye to you."
Feb
24
comment Comma placement when joining two independent clauses with a dependent clause and the word, “and.”
@MichaelRize: Yes indeed. I think each "comma decision" should be made on a case-by-case basis. If you can read the sentence just as easily (or even more easily) with extra commas, I say go ahead. If not . . .. Don
Feb
24
comment When to use “we are meant to be”?
@LittleEva: Thanks, Eva. Don
Feb
24
comment Comma placement when joining two independent clauses with a dependent clause and the word, “and.”
@BlessedGeek: Guess I should've put a [sic] after the word "at." Believe it or not, I did notice the error. Don
Feb
24
answered Comma placement when joining two independent clauses with a dependent clause and the word, “and.”
Feb
24
revised When to use “we are meant to be”?
minor touch-ups; added heuristics