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4h
revised “Plan to do” vs. “plan on doing”
added some necessary words
6h
comment Possessive Pronouns - they made the final decision vs they made their final decision
Which sentence is right depends on which meaning you want to convey. Sentence number one puts the spotlight on the people who made the decision. In other words, THEY were the decision makers, not some other group of people, and perhaps their right to have made the decision is being called into question. Sentence number two assumes there is only one group of people making the decision, and the finality of their decision is being brought into question. So, which meaning do you want? BTW, the word "they" in sentence one would be stressed: I thought THEY [i.e., not someone else] . . ..
1d
comment Someone who does not like excess
There's another website you might want to check out: wordhippo.com. If you need a synonym or antonym for a given word, go there and simply type the word in and ask for either one. You'll get, usually, a bunch of either. For example, given your question I might ask the wordhippo for an antonym for "materialistic." don
1d
answered Someone who does not like excess
1d
answered “Incremental” growth as growth by a minimum unit
Apr
24
awarded  phrase-requests
Apr
22
comment Is there a word for “knowing what makes people tick”?
@Drew: But it COULD be, n'est-ce pas? Don
Apr
22
answered Is there a word for “knowing what makes people tick”?
Apr
21
comment I'm not entirely sure of my placement of commas
@Emily: That's entirely up to you. If you want the two phenomena to be separate from one another, perhaps because one is more important than the other, then keep the commas and use a singular verb. If, OTOH, you want to combine the two phenomena, you can use a plural verb (act), OR you can combine the two in such a way that you can use a singular verb (I'll add this option to my answer), as in "The essential destruction of the human species and society acts as a metaphor . . .." Hint: search online for info. about restrictive and non-restrictive clauses. Don
Apr
21
comment I'm not entirely sure of my placement of commas
@Emily: I just added an additional thought or two, which may (or may not) answer your question. If not, let me know. Don
Apr
21
revised I'm not entirely sure of my placement of commas
changed a word
Apr
21
answered I'm not entirely sure of my placement of commas
Apr
20
comment What grammatical construct is this: “you wouldn't know that to talk to him”
If the person about whom you are talking used to have a pronounced stutter but now does not have a stutter, you could say of him, "You wouldn't know that to talk to him." I agree with @Lambie that the wording is informal. However, if I were talking about that former stutterer, I'd say "You'd never know that by talking to him" (or "by hearing him talk"). To me, that sounds a bit more formal, not to mention correct. Don
Apr
19
revised Correct tense of verb
wrong verb
Apr
19
answered Comma use in an intermediate sentence
Apr
19
comment Comma use in an intermediate sentence
Personally, I avoid the word "it" when it doesn't actually have an antecedent. To make your sentence less inexact and more concrete I suggest you drop the "it". Also, instead of the word "to", you should use the word "for" (The reason FOR the financial crisis . . .). Don
Apr
19
answered Is there a single word that means expressing insincere kindness in order to draw attention to oneself?
Apr
16
comment Does “taking the heart out of something” mean to defeat it?
@NVZ: Thanks for using your eagle eye in editing my answer! Don
Apr
16
revised Does “taking the heart out of something” mean to defeat it?
reworded a sentence
Apr
15
comment Does “taking the heart out of something” mean to defeat it?
@ Spratty: I adapted the above comment made by "Astorian" here: boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=260391. Don