7,292 reputation
326
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location Pittsburgh, PA
age 64
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Nov 25 at 3:15

For the last 57 years, I have been a practicing Christian (liberally conservative and evangelical). Should any posting I make to any Stack Exchange website pique your curiosity as to the what and why of my beliefs, feel free to communicate with me at drlarter@yahoo.com. I do not claim to have all the answers--let alone all the questions(!), but I would consider it a privilege to discuss Christianity with you in a rational and civilized fashion.

My wife (a native Egyptian and Christian) and I have been married over 41 years. We have two grown children who have flown the coop, making us empty nesters.

I have a Master's degree in Speech Communications and three years of doctoral studies in Rhetorical Theory at the University of Pittsburgh. After a brief stint as a teacher of public speaking, I embarked on a couple of different and totally divergent pursuits by owning and operating two small businesses.

Tired of being in business for myself, I went back to school at Duquesne University's Paralegal Institute in Pittsburgh, where I received a General Practice Certificate last December (2013). I am currently looking for employment in that field, and would like to round out the last stage of my work life in some area of jurisprudence.

A rhetorical perspective is almost as natural to me as breathing. Overt and covert attempts at persuasion, whether written or spoken, are my legitimate targets for analysis, evaluation, and criticism. Of particular interest to the EL&U web site contributors would be, with some adaptations and modifications, the traditional canons of speech: style (elocutio), invention (inventio), organization (dispositio), memorability (memoria), and delivery (pronuntiatio or actio) .


Nov
24
revised Does “argumentative” have negative connotation? If so, what's a more neutral word?
added to a list
Nov
24
comment Does “argumentative” have negative connotation? If so, what's a more neutral word?
thePetProjectProgrammer: That's OK. Then how about incredulity? He was characterized as a man of natural incredulity. Adjectival form: incredulous. I'll add it to my list, above. Don
Nov
22
comment Is there a word that describes this gesture of interlocking hands on the lower stomach?
Well, it ain't "akimbo"!
Nov
21
revised Does “argumentative” have negative connotation? If so, what's a more neutral word?
regrouped my list
Nov
21
comment Does “argumentative” have negative connotation? If so, what's a more neutral word?
@Mari-LouA: Your wish is my command. Don
Nov
21
comment Grammar “Is” or “Are”
Another possibility, particularly when the outdoor activity is almost an afterthought: Hiking--and outdoor activity in general--is overrated. Or, the outdoor activity could also be in parentheses, and the verb would still be singular. Don
Nov
21
answered Is there a word to express the idea of everything one could need?
Nov
21
comment Word for a Refined idea which is a combination of two previous ideas
Some REVISIONS can result in something stronger, too, but not necessarily. I think @Cerberus is spot-on with SYNTHESIS, however.
Nov
19
answered Does “argumentative” have negative connotation? If so, what's a more neutral word?
Nov
18
comment Better word or phrase for “very profound”
How about, like, "Profound, like, to the max!"? Maybe not. How about, "Like, totally profound, dude!"? Again, maybe not. What about, "That's deep, man, really deep, like for sure!"? I think I'll quit right there.
Nov
18
comment Name of the exercise/machine in the gym
What's a back squat? Is that the same as a standing squat with the barbell balanced evenly at the base of your neck? I used to perform a squat of sorts while on my back, and I called it a leg press. Hence, the apparatus would be called a leg-press machine. Actually, there are at least two such machines. One has you lying flat on your back with the weight situated directly above you, and you push the weight straight up. The other has you seated on your buttocks at an angle in such a way that you push the weight up at, say, a 45-degree angle. The latter is called an incline leg-press machine(?).
Nov
18
comment Alternative to “thankful for”
@FumbleFingers: Yeah, I consulted the same web site. That's one reason why I added the qualification about the difficulties associated with accuracy and attribution. I mean, who really knows who said what (and when, and how, and why)? Apart from an original manuscript of a speech, e.g. (and there are problems even with those, since they can be faked, or proved to be a copy) or a tape recording (again, not infallible), it's almost safer simply to say, "Someone has said . . .." I have a feeling, however, that a big name attached to a quotation adds some gravitas to one's speech and/or writing.
Nov
18
comment What does “To get on a high horse” mean?
The idiom means that the speaker, at the risk of sounding arrogant, snooty, highfaluting, hoity toity, and so on, will venture to state his humble opinion anyway. Another way of saying the same thing is the idiom "In my humble opinion . . .." In other words, one's opinion may seem to others to be anything but humble. It may even give others the impression that you're getting on your high horse!
Nov
18
comment Alternative to “thankful for”
@FumbleFingers: Methinks thou misseth the ironic undertone of Sir Winston's utterance. He's making fun of how awkward a sentence can sound when we hew legalistically to some silly rule which has been passed down from pedant to pedant over who knows how many years. Now, if the way I stated my case caused you to think that I think Sir Winston thought a preposition is a word we SHOULDN'T end a sentence with, then I bear the full weight of responsibility for the corrigendum.
Nov
18
comment Rhetorical device - listing rejected answers
As with many figures, it's hard to know where one leaves off and another begins. They comprise a mélange of several figures. So it is with Cicero's extended figure. In addition to RegDwigHt's paradistole and auxesis, there's also an element of climax (gradatio), simple repetition ("no . . . no . . . no . . . no) and perhaps others. Operationally, the device functions to refute other possible--but incorrect--theories about how the person in question was able to perform his "incredible voyage." It also serves to delimit "all" possible theories, both incorrect and, of course, THE correct one!
Nov
18
revised Rhetorical device - listing rejected answers
tidied it up a bit. corrected an erratum. highlighted the example.
Nov
18
answered Alternative to “thankful for”
Nov
18
comment Are we using the term 'apocalypse' in wrong way?
@Mari-LouA: No argument there! Perhaps the question itself would be a better fit in SE.Christianity. Don
Nov
18
revised Are we using the term 'apocalypse' in wrong way?
reworded first paragraph
Nov
18
revised Are we using the term 'apocalypse' in wrong way?
reworded first paragraph