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Jul
3
comment What word describes a self -created word/expression with an intuitive meaning?
Sounds good to me. Or how about "a made-up word"?
Jul
3
revised Deference vs Respect: What's the difference?
yada, yada, yada
Jul
2
answered Deference vs Respect: What's the difference?
Jul
1
revised What to call words with permanent prefix, but no unprefixed form? (ex: nonchalant, untoward)
added quot. marks to quoted material
Jun
30
awarded  meaning
Jun
30
comment Single word for someone who doesn't let anyone walk all over them (antonym of 'pushover')
@TusharRaj: I'll renege on my offer. I'm obviously outclassed by some of the fine answers above. Don
Jun
29
comment Single word for someone who doesn't let anyone walk all over them (antonym of 'pushover')
@TusharRaj: As a ideational person, I spent probably all of five minutes on my list. Ideas come quickly to me, and given the depth of my background in a variety of disciplines, I exerted very little effort in formulating a list of this sort. If you want ten more suggestions, just let me know. Don
Jun
29
answered Does this word exist?
Jun
29
answered Single word for someone who doesn't let anyone walk all over them (antonym of 'pushover')
Jun
29
revised What would you call a person who keeps on boasting about himself and is jealous of others' achievements?
substituted envious for jealous
Jun
28
comment Reading Comprehension Question: How to narrow down to correct answer?
@StoneyB: I'm not saying English departments are sealed off from rhetorical study. I'm saying the rhetoric/communication department in many American universities is separate from the English department, and the two departments, for various reasons, are treated as two distinct entities in many American universities. Perhaps one reason is that the subject matter--as you observed--is "just too damn big." At any rate, I agree to play nice from now on and abide by the Constitution and bylaws of E L& U. In the words of the late Rodney King, however, "Can't we all just get along?" Don
Jun
28
comment What to call words with permanent prefix, but no unprefixed form? (ex: nonchalant, untoward)
@BrianHitchcock: I'm just the messenger. I do not necessarily endorse every exemplar put forward by 2wheels. Don
Jun
28
comment What to call words with permanent prefix, but no unprefixed form? (ex: nonchalant, untoward)
@JoeBlow: I'm just the messenger. I do not necessarily endorse every exemplar put forward by 2wheels. Don
Jun
28
comment What to call words with permanent prefix, but no unprefixed form? (ex: nonchalant, untoward)
@Meelo: I'm just the messenger. I do not necessarily endorse every exemplar put forward by 2wheels. Don
Jun
28
comment Synonym for “swearing”
@rogermue: Or "cussin'" (i.e., cussing), as in "We're cussin', we're pourin', we're smoking dope; Sunday morning, we're holier than the pope" (Van Dyke Parks). Don
Jun
28
comment Reading Comprehension Question: How to narrow down to correct answer?
@StoneyB: Good points, but I still disagree with ya'. (BTW, no offense taken on the close vote.) The barrier which has been erected between rhetoric, on the one hand, and English Language and Usage on the other hand, has existed for decades, if not centuries. The barrier is, at best, artificial. Bracketing rhetoric from English is like bracketing historiography from history. To this day, unfortunately, English departments in universities are hermetically sealed off from departments of rhetorical theory. On second thought, maybe it's fortunate; at least the separation prevents bloodshed! Don
Jun
28
answered What to call words with permanent prefix, but no unprefixed form? (ex: nonchalant, untoward)
Jun
28
comment Bill reading Shakespeare and Maureen singing Schubert satisfy/satisfies me
Heck, you could even say "Bill reading Shakespeare and Maureen singing Schubert back to back satisfies me."
Jun
27
revised Reading Comprehension Question: How to narrow down to correct answer?
yadda, yadda, yadda
Jun
27
answered Reading Comprehension Question: How to narrow down to correct answer?