Reputation
10,461
Next privilege 15,000 Rep.
Protect questions
Badges
8 29
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~829k people reached

18h
comment Where does “the sky is falling” come from?
@Josh61: I was reminded of the proverb in the Book of Proverbs, chapter 22, verse 13, which says, "The sluggard saith, 'There is a lion without: I shall be slain in the streets.'" The sluggard is a recurring character in Proverbs, and he qualifies as one kind of fool among many different kinds of fools . Don
18h
comment Label word for someone?
I'm with @Yay. We need more context and more details in order to answer your question.
18h
comment Sycophant - Fig-shower: pronounce the word shower in fig-shower?
You're joking, yes?
18h
answered Meaning of `put defeat behind`
Feb
3
answered Someone who is adept/multi-talented in related activities
Feb
1
comment Word for a person who is “needy.”
"He's a bottomless pit of need!"
Jan
31
comment 'The thing is done with' tense
In describing a procedure, I'd say simply, "You wash the bowl with water. Then you insert the dry ingredients which have already been combined in a different bowl. Then you add the wet ingredients. Finally, you whisk the mixture by hand until . . .." That sort of thing. The "The bowl is washed with water" sounds kinda formal--unnecessarily so. Why not simplify and say, "Wash the bowl with water . . ."?
Jan
31
comment Plastic silverware - What's that? (American English)
Being a stickler for accuracy, if I'm going on a picnic and I want to make sure we have implements for shoving food in the pie hole, I'll ask, "Who's packing the plastic spoons, knives, and forks (or even sporks, a hybrid spoon/fork). I don't think I'd be so bold as to correct someone who called the plastic utensils "silverware," but inside I'd feel pretty smug and superior! (kidding . . . kinda). Don
Jan
31
comment Specific term for perception bias of content
Hometown bias. Goes along quite nicely with hometown advantage. Hometown folks feel pride in their little corner of the vineyard, and consequently they can't (or won't) admit that something bad came out of something so obviously good; namely, their beloved hometown.
Jan
27
comment Can I use a comparative adjective as a noun?
Context, context, context. A sentence without a context is a pretext. "Two brothers were fighting, because the younger brother thought the older was picking on him too much." I think that's what Edwin Ashworth is getting at. Don
Jan
26
comment What is the opposite of someone who has been sheltered?
S/he has had A WIDE EXPOSURE to the world and its many people-groups, cultures and worldviews, thanks to his/her parents and the way they reared him.
Jan
26
comment Correct usage of the possessive in the name “Christiaan Huygens”
@Cyberherbalist. Thanks! I like yours's too! (Now wait a minute . . ..) Don
Jan
26
comment Who or What for question about statement
Question: "If Joe Biden is Vice President, then what is Obama?" Answer: "Obama is the President." I'm not saying the "answer" is (necessarily) grammatically correct, but it would be perfectly fine in normal conversation, yes? Oh, and I'm sure you're not a buffoon! Don
Jan
26
comment Who or What for question about statement
Question: "If Joe Biden is Vice President, then what is Obama?" Answer: "Obama is the President." I'm not saying the "answer" is (necessarily) grammatically correct, but it would be perfectly fine in normal conversation, yes?
Jan
26
answered Correct usage of the possessive in the name “Christiaan Huygens”
Jan
26
answered Is there a phrase(or a metaphor) that describes a person who has a restless mind?
Jan
26
comment When did the phrase “eat sh*t” enter the English Language?
Nice catch with Isaiah 36:12.
Jan
26
comment When did the phrase “eat sh*t” enter the English Language?
@Mitch: You're certainly a cheeky sod! Funny, but cheeky!
Jan
26
comment An adjective for a film or book with very long dialogues
How about a hyphenated word? For example, "dialogue-driven." "My Dinner With Andre" is definitely a dialogue-driven film.
Jan
20
comment Omission of 'for' with various quantified time intervals: influence of verb
Just a thought . . .. If you were to turn your first statement into a question, which of the following versions would sound best to your ears?: "How many years have you lived here?"; "For how many years have you lived here?"; or "How many years have you lived here for?" Do the same for the second sentence: "Have you studied English 10 years?"; "Have you studied English for 10 years?" Again, which sounds better to you?