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a bharal is a wild himilayan mountain goat!

bleat!

developer specialising in Java work at IBs

currently building startup sites using cakePHP and Django (separately. There are two sites, not one!)


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
17
comment About the use of metaphorical language
for example, consider "the pit was as dark as a bottomless pit", where we have a simile. Now consider "the 12 foot pit was a bottomless pit of despair", which is now a metaphor. Now jump to "the 12 foot pit was a bottomless pit", which is roughly the same metaphor. Finally we can leap over to the question OP has asked, which i think in rough and ready terms is actually a metaphor.
Sep
17
comment About the use of metaphorical language
why would it not be a metaphor? X is spoken of as Y - a pit that is not, in fact, bottomless (inferred as the poor person has fallen to their death, implying a bottom, altho perhaps starvation could be argued too) is, however, spoken of as bottomless.
Mar
31
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Feb
24
asked What does “well regulated” mean, and could it have meant anything different in the past?
Dec
29
comment the narrator keep trying vs. the narrator keeps
why is this downvoted at all?
Dec
28
comment How many adjectives can be chained without sounding weird?
dammit - that made me laugh.
Dec
28
comment How many adjectives can be chained without sounding weird?
-1 references? otherwise this is wrong. Wrong, smarmy and condescending.
Dec
28
comment When tagging a picture, which statement is correct if it includes yourself and a friend? I was taught friend's name then mine
downvoting this is stupid. The question is fair, why downvote a dupe?
Dec
24
comment is onomatopoeia itself onomatopoeic?
But that isn't the definition of the word at all, is it? Websters has 2 definitions - the more poingant being the use of words whose sound suggests the sense which is the crux of the question
Dec
21
comment is onomatopoeia itself onomatopoeic?
no, that's not true. "door" means a door, but the sound the word makes isn't in any way related to the concept of a door. Onomatopoeia means, a word in place of a sound. The sound the word makes is related to the concept - because it is the concept.
Dec
21
comment is onomatopoeia itself onomatopoeic?
@JLG I'm not arguing that the etymology would imply that the word is based on a sound. I'm asking ~ well, I suppose now i'm arguing ~ that the word and the sound of the word neatly coalesce into a respectable (if unorthodox) example of the meaning of the word.
Dec
21
awarded  Commentator
Dec
21
comment is onomatopoeia itself onomatopoeic?
An onomatope makes a "barroooo, baroooo" sound, but that just seems a bit OT.
Dec
21
comment is onomatopoeia itself onomatopoeic?
the sound it represents is itself... that is, when you say the word, well, there. The sound is made. Much like when you say woof - and what does "woof" mean? Well, "woof" is the literal representation of the sound a dog makes. What does onomatopia mean? It is the literal representation of the sound that literally representing a sound makes.
Dec
20
awarded  Critic
Dec
20
comment is onomatopoeia itself onomatopoeic?
well, (and now i might recall where i was in this particular debate) - if you know what onomatopoeia means, how doesn't the soud of the word suggest its meaning? In fact, the sound of the word is directly tied to its meaning, no?
Dec
20
comment is onomatopoeia itself onomatopoeic?
clever, huh? word.
Dec
20
asked is onomatopoeia itself onomatopoeic?
Dec
18
comment The difference between an analogy and a metaphor?
it's like the difference between a dream and a daydream