1,997 reputation
414
bio website
location Surrey, United Kingdom
age
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen Feb 6 '13 at 16:09

I have a BA Hons degree in typographic design and Masters degree in business administration. I worked in the publishing industry for 30 years as a setter, copy editor and proof reader, before moving into management. Now semi-retired.

My main interest areas are cookery, cricket, and reading/writing.


Dec
19
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
13
awarded  Yearling
Jul
5
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
24
comment What word describes this form of unreadability best?
I would suggest unintelligible or incomprehensible both meaning difficult to understand. People read by word wholes, and are far more used to the shape of lower case letters to read the word wholes. All capitals makes it much harder to read the individual words.
Jan
24
comment Pronunciations of 'retard' and 'retardation'
@coleopterist Advance and retard of engine timing? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ignition_timing
Jan
24
comment Antonyms of “lesser” and “greater”
Lesser and greater are antonyms of each other, are you asking for synonyms of those two words?
Jan
24
comment Pronunciations of 'retard' and 'retardation'
@coleopterist Yes I understand now you were referring to the colloquial slang derogatory term retard which does tend to be pronounced reeeeeetard, rather than the retard of engine timing.
Jan
24
comment Meaning of “as close as you can get with safe sex”
The difference between safe sex and unsafe sex is the thickness of a condom or rubber or whatever you want to call it. That's how close. It's an analogy.
Jan
24
comment Does “unfold with something” mean “unfold like something”?
Imagine a running stream of fluid - the water in a stream. Now imagine unfolding many folds of paper or cloth, the unfolding is like the stream of water - fluid.
Jan
23
comment What does the term “86'd” relate to?
I'm inclined to go with the Delmonaco Resaurant explanation as in my limited experience of the term it's been used to say an item has been removed from the menu. I've not heard it used in any other context.
Jan
23
answered Word for “buying more expensive items to go with the expensive item you actually want”
Jan
23
comment Single word for “for how long information is considered fresh”
@scott I think our interpretation of what OP is looking for is somewhat different.
Jan
23
comment Pronunciation of “lib”
The pronunciation probably comes from ad-lib people have become used to pronouncing that with a hard b as in nib. The lib from library merely followed that, rather than a shortened form of library with a soft b as in libation.
Jan
23
comment Single word for “for how long information is considered fresh”
@scott I don't see how relevant answers the OP's question regarding a constantly changing score. What describes a score that is only correct at the time of a page refresh? Current score.
Jan
23
comment Being capable enough to do something “in anger”?
Liken it to this: Doug knows how to use a sword, but maybe not enough to kill someone with it. In other words, to use it in anger means to really do something with it – to achieve the purpose of knowing the skill.
Jan
23
comment They've insist or they insisted
You must mean them the other way round: they insist and they've insisted. The first happens in the present and the second in the past.
Jan
23
comment Pronunciations of 'retard' and 'retardation'
Peter thank you for your comments. Whilst I've always pronounced retard in retard and retardation the same way it does occur that the OP is referring to the derogatory term retard, rather than the advance and retard of an engines timing. In the US I beleive there is a distinct difference in pronunciation between the two words. I would however, pronounce it the same way.
Jan
23
comment Single word for “for how long information is considered fresh”
How might you apply this to the OP's example of a cricket score? Topicality at the moment is 63-1?
Jan
23
comment Pronunciations of 'retard' and 'retardation'
You should really make it clear that you are referring to the American English pronunciation here. British English pronunciation is different.