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Mar
19
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
28
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
22
comment “manieth”, is it acknowledged?
I didn't know this was such a famous question in English. I should have looked harder for duplicates. This question can be closed now.
Feb
22
comment “manieth”, is it acknowledged?
Does this answer show that a native speaker of English does not feel inconvenient without the word like "manieth"? If that's the case, that means English speakers can come up with questions without using the concept of "manieth", which I hardly can because my mother language has a word that means "how manieth". Speakers of the Languages without the concept of "maneith" can construct the questions which the speakers of the languages that have a word for "manieth" make using that word. I should bring this matter over to the linguistics forum.
Feb
22
comment “manieth”, is it acknowledged?
Now that I've read that question, I'm curious if "what number~" sounds acceptable/natural for British people. But I guess I'll post that as another question.
Feb
22
asked “manieth”, is it acknowledged?
Feb
19
comment “All you have to do is read” vs. “All you have to do is to read”
Thank you. Now I've realized I had been misunderstanding that we can use "to" in any of these "All/what you do is..." sentences. So, there are cases where we can't use "to" at all (not even optional) like "What you must do is...", and in other cases it is almost necessary to use "to" like in "All I hope for is to finish early.".
Feb
19
comment “All you have to do is read” vs. “All you have to do is to read”
I'd be glad if you could elaborate on why this is metanalysis. I thought that the "to" was meant to nominalize the verb as in the sentence "To die is gain.".
Feb
19
awarded  Commentator
Feb
19
comment “All you have to do is read” vs. “All you have to do is to read”
I'm an English learner and I was taught "to" is optional in the cases such as the one mentioned in the question. You can either keep "to" or omit it. Now I'm confused...
Feb
1
awarded  Enthusiast
Jan
16
accepted Usage of English definite article when referring to generic word
Jan
16
awarded  Supporter
Jan
16
accepted “Go shut the door” or “Go and shut the door”: AmE/BrE difference
Jan
15
asked “Go shut the door” or “Go and shut the door”: AmE/BrE difference
Jan
5
awarded  Scholar
Jan
5
accepted The original usage of past participles
Jan
4
comment The original usage of past participles
My guess is that passive sentences are all in perfect tense in a broader sense. "He is killed." basically means "He is in a state where an action called killing has been executed." Past participles are actually like adjectives that show the subject is in a state where some sort of action(=verb) has been executed. Their being called "passive" is a side product from that function.
Jan
4
asked The original usage of past participles
Dec
25
awarded  Teacher