345 reputation
16
bio website ianatkin.info
location Sunnyvale, CA
age 46
visits member for 1 year, 4 months
seen May 6 '13 at 23:40

I type lots of itty-bitty characters in the hope that they'll do something useful.

I develop applications for the web that serve thousands, and sometimes millions, of users.

I specialize in back-end fun these days, but have a long history of trying to make Internet Explorer do something approaching sensible, and other activities generally described as front-end.

I love to read and study the hardcore concepts of computer science, as well as the whole shebang/gamut of computing history. Areas of particular interest are SmallTalk, Lisp, and the amazing work done at Apple in the late 70s and early 80s.

I also do nerdy stuff with electronic music, and when I find time I also read the mainstay of all geeks: science fiction. I guess I'm true to type. I also enjoy watching vintage movies of all sizes and subjects, but have a fondness for B-movies and dystopic tales.

Cue the Zombie Apocalypse!


Dec
8
awarded  Yearling
Dec
13
comment How did “to lie” (i.e lie about something) and “to lie” (i.e. lie down) end up being spelled the same way?
Here lyes the body of Edward Dean
Dec
13
comment How did “to lie” (i.e lie about something) and “to lie” (i.e. lie down) end up being spelled the same way?
'[...] no "English Language Design Committee"' unless you consider the work of Noah Webster and his contemporaries.
Dec
13
comment What is the name for the inverse of an aphorism
@Luke Not even "Polaroid"?
Dec
13
awarded  Commentator
Dec
13
comment What is the name for the inverse of an aphorism
Frankly dam, I don't give a deer!
Dec
11
comment Use of 'That“ rather than ”the"
I always believed it was just idiomatic use of the language to indicate that the subject (of the sentence) was something "we are both familiar with". In the case cited, I think there's an element of sarcasm too, to which you refer.
Dec
11
comment Should the title of a short story have a comma after it if it is the subject of a sentence?
@BarrieEngland I'll be sure to send Larry some José Saramago novels. He dispensed with the quotes and relied solely on punctuation and the intelligence of the reader. He didn't even use paragraphs to delineate different speakers that much. Point being, prose can do anything it wants. But if you look up the AP Manual or the Chicago Manual you'll see that the punctuation is normal in work of a journalistic nature. Because the English language is dynamic and evolving, I'll submit to any subtleties, but this was how I was taught.
Dec
11
comment Should the title of a short story have a comma after it if it is the subject of a sentence?
@RyanMcClure You're absolutely right. The comma comes before in British and US English. Edited to fix that.
Dec
11
revised Should the title of a short story have a comma after it if it is the subject of a sentence?
edited body
Dec
11
answered Does “more or less” mean “almost”?
Dec
11
answered Should the title of a short story have a comma after it if it is the subject of a sentence?
Dec
10
comment What is the difference between “ I look him” and “ I look at him”?
This is probably the result of a badly edited book! Read some more to see if there are any more "gems" in there. :)
Dec
10
comment Where does “ta!” come from?
I'm sorry but I can't "buy" this etymology at all. "Ta ta" also gets written off as baby talk. If you spend a few weeks in the north of England, you'd quickly realize that "ta" has nothing to do with babies.
Dec
10
awarded  Critic
Dec
8
comment What does “pre-delay” mean in this conversation?
She was lying about her activity on Facebook. The delays she was purportedly checking for were in relation to her morning commute to work (one would assume). Consider this to be analogous to checking the traffic report for accidents and construction.
Dec
8
comment What is a more modern variant of the interjection 'Lo!"
"Lo" is short for lok "look!" imperative of loken "to look". Loken (third-person singular simple present loketh, present participle lokinge, simple past and past participle loked). Origin is Swedish, as imported by the Vikings. So @StoneyB get my vote.
Dec
8
awarded  Supporter
Dec
8
answered How did “to lie” (i.e lie about something) and “to lie” (i.e. lie down) end up being spelled the same way?
Dec
8
answered What are the connotations of the word “Greetings” when used as a greeting?