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seen Jan 15 at 19:36

I am a software engineer at Beckman Couleter, Inc. I enjoy reading, playing piano, and dancing.


Jan
9
revised The difference between “I used to” and “I'm used to”
deleted 6 characters in body
Jan
9
awarded  Yearling
Jan
8
answered The difference between “I used to” and “I'm used to”
Jan
8
comment The difference between “I used to” and “I'm used to”
@Araucaria And I'm not even sure the implication is there. "I'm used to showering before bed," for instance, does not at all imply that one once thought it strange or odd to shower before bed.
Jan
6
comment Is there a word similar to “reddening” for the color blue?
@Bobson Um, because then we'd lose the sexiest word in the language?
Jan
6
comment Is there a word similar to “reddening” for the color blue?
@Bobson Are you sure you want to avoid consecutive vowels? xkcd.com/853
Dec
19
comment Word for mildly popular (used as a compliment)
@DavidRicherby I don't think well-received necessarily means well-received by critics, though that's probably the most common usage.
Dec
19
comment Word for mildly popular (used as a compliment)
@DavidRicherby ....and yet vastly more than half the population has an average number of legs, rounded to the nearest leg.
Dec
16
comment Non-religious equivalent expression for “Pray for [Country X]” after a disaster
@quant The question doesn't ask about "compassion and sentiment," though; it asks about "prayer," about the only secular version of which is "positive thoughts." It's not necessarily logically inconsistent to not believe in God but to believe that positive thoughts/energy can have a good effect, but I'd argue that the latter belief still requires some kind of generic "spiritualism." For a materialist/rationalist, compassion and sentiment can only have a positive effect when communicated to the recipient. Prayer doesn't count.
Dec
16
comment What is it called when something you previously took to be a mistake turned out to be the correct decision?
Yes, I think so!
Dec
16
comment What is it called when something you previously took to be a mistake turned out to be the correct decision?
....erm...in that case your antecedent in the last sentence ("It is also used as below...") is confusing; it sounds like you're saying that the phrase "felix culpa" is used more commonly. What you mean is that "the phrases below are more common."
Dec
15
comment What is it called when something you previously took to be a mistake turned out to be the correct decision?
This is pretty rare--so rare, in fact, that I don't know of any usage outside the orthodox religious tradition you cite. That said, it's a great phrase, so +1 anyway.
Dec
12
comment What does “and counting” in “Bits of plastic in oceans: 5.25 trillion and counting” mean?
@YoichiOishi I'm sure that a gradual increase is precisely what's being described.
Dec
10
comment Is there a saying or proverb for a situation where the weakest party will always lose?
Hey, an answer with a saying that's actually in common use! Props.
Dec
10
comment Is there a saying or proverb for a situation where the weakest party will always lose?
This is almost exactly like Sun Tzu's advice in Art of War re: whetstones and eggs. But that is the only place I've ever heard anything like it.
Dec
2
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
Re: background, who is Trevor?
Dec
2
comment Sentences start with Of
The "of" fragments in the example given are certainly semantic continuations of the thought in the original sentence, but they cannot be syntactic continuations, since there's no way to splice each fragment into the original sentence in a grammatically correct way, given that the linking verb "is" comes after the original "of".
Nov
18
comment word or phrase for a smell that sparks nebulous memories of times or places past
To modern ears, the association with smell has probably disappeared entirely; still, this is quite a nice choice of words.
Oct
22
comment Secular phrase for “Heaven only knows” or “God only knows”?
I think I've heard "fuck(ed) if I know," but I don't think I've ever heard "fuck only knows." @rpilkey: Seriously??
Oct
21
comment Alternative expression for “xyz Nazi”
@JoeBlow Ah, got it. I thought there was some particular "Seinfeldian" usage of "apocryphal."