Reputation
284
Top tag
Next privilege 300 Rep.
Create new tags
Badges
2 7
Newest
 Pundit
Impact
~48k people reached

Apr
19
comment Derogatory word or idiom for city dwellers
Once again I win "guess the top-rated answer from the title of the question"!
Mar
30
comment What is the word for “the smell of rain”?
@Drew That's just because OP came up with poor example sentences. The actual question was "Do we have a word describing the smell of rain"? Any word that specifically means "the smell of rain" would be tautological in the sentence "the rain smelt like <x>".
Mar
26
comment “To science the sh*t out of something”
The "turtled" sentence is funny, but I don't really see much similarity with the sentence from The Martian.
Mar
26
comment Can you “do” Science?
As for The Martian, part of why intended humor of the sentence comes from the "improper" use of the word "science".
Mar
26
comment Can you “do” Science?
My problem with your child's use of the phrase is that I think of "doing science" as an imprecise/colloquial way of saying "making scientific discoveries", i.e. performing scientific research. This is presumably not what your child is talking about. (Also, it's questionable how "wrong" a colloquialism can be.)
Mar
25
comment Seeking Generic Word: Place where opponents fight
@KiloVoltaire Consider this famous quote from T.R. Roosevelt: "The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly .... his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat. " Clearly spectators don't count. I would say that this is a fairly typical usage, and that in the relatively few cases where spectators are included (eg. when discussing a specific sports venue with "arena" in the name), context should clarify.
Jan
8
comment What are someone's 'last words' called?
@T.J.Crowder I suspect that the intent of the phrase "spoken on their deathbed" is just to emphasize that what OP is looking for is the last words of someone's life.
Jan
8
comment What are someone's 'last words' called?
There's nothing in the definition (or in any usage I've ever heard) to indicate that these are the last words of someone's entire life. Now "expiration peroration," though.... :D
Dec
16
comment Is it “chalk it up to” or “chock it up to”?
I don't really understand how "chock [something] up to" would make sense, even interpreting "chock up" as a quasi-synonym for "support" or "encourage" -- shouldn't it be "chock [something] up with"?
Nov
20
comment How far back in time could I travel and still be understood?
+1 for mentioning the vowel shift, which I imagine would probably be the first big surprise if one were to steadily travel back in time trying to speak English.
Oct
19
comment Can I use the F-word in a formal context?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit I don't understand why you think that doesn't work as a comment, but does work as an answer. I also don't understand why you seem to be irritated that it was turned into a comment rather than pleasantly surprised that it wasn't simply deleted, as it well could have been.
Oct
18
suggested rejected edit on Can I use the F-word in a formal context?
Oct
18
comment Can I use the F-word in a formal context?
I believe (though I do not know for sure) that your understanding of the word's etymology is precisely backwards: I expect that the sexual meaning came first, and that it has deteriorated into a meaningless intensifier over time. (I also expect that despite its age it has always or almost always been considered vulgar.) Also, I am extremely curious about this "formal context" involving "nobles" at which you are planning on making a "declaration of war". It sounds awesome. Are you secretly from another century?
Oct
18
revised Can I use the F-word in a formal context?
Remove unnecessary prologue sentence
Oct
18
suggested approved edit on Can I use the F-word in a formal context?
Oct
8
comment How to say “It's not rocket science” before rockets existed
Wodehouse invented the famous "it's elementary" quote? Nice!
Jul
8
comment Idiom for someone who buys all the best gear to do something before they even have a basic proficiency?
Yep, it's definitely time to start using this here in the US and hoping it spreads!
Jul
8
comment Idiom for someone who buys all the best gear to do something before they even have a basic proficiency?
@gnasher729 That might make sense for a relatively cheap instrument for which the lower-quality versions have notable defects, such as a ukelele. As a musician myself, though, I don't think I'd ever recommend beginners start with expensive instruments; they're just too expensive asa way to "try out" a hobby.
Jun
6
comment Word for taking too much pride in something mediocre
To be fair, a burger a minute for five minutes straight does sound like something I, at least, couldn't manage.
May
27
comment A correct word for 'learnful'
@Mari-LouA 868? That's nothing. Even "logorrhea" has 11,500 results. I've never encountered the word "learningful" until your comment.