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I am a software engineer at Avago Technologies. I enjoy reading, playing piano, and dancing.


13h
comment Connotation of “appease”
Neither of those statements tells anyone anything about the speaker's attitude, though, which is what this question is about.
19h
comment Connotation of “appease”
I'm not sure there's enough context from just that sentence to infer anything about a disagreement between Bob and "them." In any case, this doesn't really answer the question of whether there's a positive or a negative connotation.
Jul
18
comment Too serious to take seriously
+1 for mentioning a bunch of related effects. I'm not sure there's any one "right" phrase for this situation.
Jul
18
comment Too serious to take seriously
Clarifications should really be in edits. I'm not sure why you think this is an answer (satisfactory or not), unless you're suggesting "supercooled liquid" as a possible phrasing.
Jul
14
comment What do you call someone who was doing bad things, and he doesn't anymore?
Moreover, you're still making this a grammatical discussion when it was never Jason C's intent to challenge the grammaticality of the phrase "rectified person." The "basic mechanics of English grammar" do indeed make "rectified person" a "valid, if...extremely uncommon" phrase, but they don't specify that it means what this answer claims it means (because grammar and semantics are distinct).
Jul
13
comment What do you call someone who was doing bad things, and he doesn't anymore?
@trlkly It is in no way clear to me that the "claim that the term simply does not have the meaning given as an adjective" is erroneous. The moral theology sources appearing in the search query don't appear to be using the definition given; the only one I see that explains what the phrase means says, "A rectified person was thus one who had engaged in curbing negative emotions (like hatred, fear, and cruelty) and who had toiled hard to create good life habits." Thus the phrase has more to do with negative emotions than bad actions.
May
28
awarded  Citizen Patrol
May
9
comment Are there English equivalents to the Japanese saying, “There’s a god who puts you down as well as a god who picks you up”?
(There's also the Tom Waits version, from "Step Right Up": "The large print giveth, and the small print taketh away.")
May
9
comment Are there English equivalents to the Japanese saying, “There’s a god who puts you down as well as a god who picks you up”?
@BigHomie "the Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away" does not mean "Blessed be the name of the Lord." Yes, the paraphrase is taken out of context, but otherwise its meaning is essentially intact.
May
8
comment What do you call someone who says they will do things but doesn't?
Well, that certainly sounds dirty.
May
2
comment Singular of “dice”
@Richard Nope: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alea_iacta_est
May
2
comment Singular of “dice”
@mgb Yes, I do; I also distinguish between "medium" and "media."
May
1
comment How to hyphenate a negated compound noun?
@EdwinAshworth Correct; and the ones that do don't have "process" in their names; they're just called "defect source assessments."
May
1
comment How to hyphenate a negated compound noun?
Yes, the hyphens indicate the scope of the negation, but more generally they connect multiple words into a single modifier: "non-defect-source-assessment" modifies "process," which is why there is no hyphen before the last word. If, however, you were describing an assessment process that was "non-defect-source" (whatever that would mean), you would leave off the hyphen before "assessment" as well.
May
1
comment How to hyphenate a negated compound noun?
@EdwinAshworth No, because he's talking about processes that are not related to a specific process, namely, that of defect source assessment.
Apr
24
comment Is it common to say “late girlfriend”?
@DavidRicherby It's "normal" in American English, too. I'm just saying it sounds funny. My example, you'll note, is British.
Apr
24
comment Is it common to say “late girlfriend”?
"Late" as a euphemism for "dead" is, I think, a little odd-sounding even to native English speakers; Douglas Adams, for instance, played with it in the scene in H2G2 when Arthur meets Slartibartifast. S: Come now or you will be late. A: Late? What for? S: What is your name, human? A: Dent. Arthur Dent. S: Late as in the late Dentarthurdent. It's a sort of threat, you see."
Apr
23
comment Is there a single word that means “hitting the target but missing the point”?
Yep, having a whole bunch of patients suddenly die certainly sounds like an exciting journey.
Apr
23
comment Is there a single word that means “hitting the target but missing the point”?
"Pyrrhic victory" was my first thought when reading the question. I disagree that the "victory" in the phrase must refer exclusively to "one-time events." Making more hospitable beds available would generally be considered a victory of sorts, so I think the phrase is appropriate (and appropriately ironic).
Apr
23
comment Slang names for souteneur
In fact, Merriam Webster gives "pimp" as the definition of "souteneur" (which is actually marked as "misspelled" by the Chrome spellchecker).