161 reputation
6
bio website
location
age
visits member for 1 year, 8 months
seen 5 hours ago

I am a software engineer at Beckman Couleter, Inc. I enjoy reading, playing piano, and dancing.


5h
comment How do I politely say I have used my mouth while drinking water from a bottle?
"Lipped" is certainly not going to clarify matters (I think the interpretation given by David Richerby and Oldcat is going to be almost universal), but I do kind of like "defiled", at least for the humor value. Though it sounds like you've done something terrible to that glass.
Aug
14
comment I don't like potatoes or ice-cream
Note to future readers who are confused: this answer was massively edited following @Eliah Kagan's comment.
Aug
14
comment I don't like potatoes or ice-cream
@Joce To my (figurative) ear that sounds very much like an attempt to emulate the spoken word, which is reasonable since the Iliad was originally passed down orally. (My personal taste would lean toward "without him, or even with him", but that's neither here nor there.)
Aug
14
comment A word for a relationship in which one thing (or state) must exist in order for another thing (or state) to exist
In the software world (and especially in the world of build systems), prerequisite and dependency are (often) complementary terms, so the latter is probably worth mentioning here.
Aug
14
comment A word for a relationship in which one thing (or state) must exist in order for another thing (or state) to exist
Sine qua non is worth a mention here because it's a common phrase that has the meaning specified in the title of the question; it wouldn't really work in the example sentence, though, because it's not an ordering system.
Aug
12
comment I don't like potatoes or ice-cream
(3) "Dislike" would be a better choice for the alternative phrasing than "hate." "I dislike ice-cream and potatoes." (4) To use a non-negated verb (dislike or hate) and still make the separation between the two items, one could use "as well as": "I dislike potatoes as well as ice cream."
Aug
12
comment I don't like potatoes or ice-cream
I would say this construction is more typical of conversation (in which tags are used more often because sentences can't always be completely planned out in advance) than formal writing. I'd actually strongly discourage it except in conversation.
Aug
12
comment I don't like potatoes or ice-cream
I would recommend "like neither" as opposed to "neither like." The latter isn't really parallel.
Aug
12
comment I don't like potatoes or ice-cream
+1, but I don't think this is negative raising. It's just De Morgan's Law, as @Matt Gutting says.
Aug
12
comment I don't like potatoes or ice-cream
Additional notes: (1) the Oxford comma is only used in lists with three or more items (because otherwise it looks like the "and" is intended as a coordinating conjunction). (2) Another way to emphasize the separateness of the two items would be to say "I like neither potatoes nor ice cream."
Aug
8
comment Word meaning “kicking softly” or “brushing with the feet”?
...aren't most things sexual according to UrbanDictionary?
Aug
8
comment Word meaning “kicking softly” or “brushing with the feet”?
This sounds simply incorrect to me; it strikes me as the sort of thing someone might write after five minutes with a thesaurus, without actually knowing what "wafting" means. Walking is extremely unlike wafting, even if you're graceful and light-footed.
Jul
31
comment Expression for “Respect them and suspect them”
Well, yeah, because that version would actually be somewhat similar to the Hebrew saying, which, again, you seem to be missing half of.
Jul
31
comment Expression for “Respect them and suspect them”
The "first part" of the Hebrew saying is the "respect" part. And the Hebrew saying has nothing to do with saving resources.
Jul
31
comment Expression for “Respect them and suspect them”
That's not quite the same--there's no implication that you put any trust in people, which is the crux of the first part of the saying.
Jul
31
comment Sentence in which “its” and “it's” can be interchanged without changing the meaning?
@NicolasBarbulesco Wow. Yes. Correct. I meant "subordinate." Sorry.
Jul
28
comment Sentence in which “its” and “it's” can be interchanged without changing the meaning?
In other words, I suppose it's not technically ungrammatical as such even from a pretty pedantic/prescriptivist perspective (since "that" is not generally considered necessary for subjunctive clauses), but it's awkward to the point of confusion to my ears. But again, even with the "it's red" interpreted as a subjunctive clause that somehow forms the object of the verb "comprehend," I can't think of a reasonable interpretation for the sentence. I suppose you could stick a "why" in there, but then it would still be quite different from the second sentence (and from its original form).
Jul
28
comment Sentence in which “its” and “it's” can be interchanged without changing the meaning?
Okay, I suppose one could be unable to see the color red and therefore unable to comprehend it, so the second version isn't quite "completely nonsensical," but it's certainly odd (to me, at least) to call out a specific instance of the color red as being incomprehensible. I suppose the first sentence, without "that," seems ungrammatical to me simply because I've never heard or seen "comprehend" introduce a subjunctive clause before, so it's unclear to me what the function of the "it's" is without either adding "that" or switching to the infinitive mood: "I can't comprehend it to be red."
Jul
28
comment Sentence in which “its” and “it's” can be interchanged without changing the meaning?
I don't think the "comprehend" sentences have even close to equivalent meanings. The first one (with the apostrophe) seems downright ungrammatical to me; perhaps "I cannot comprehend that it's red" might work, but I can't fathom what that sentence would mean. The second one clearly means that the speaker can't comprehend the redness of something, which is completely nonsensical but at least appears meaningful in some way. I do not see how the sentence "I cannot comprehend that it is red" (much less the original version with the contraction) could share that meaning, though.
Jul
24
comment Connotation of “appease”
Neither of those statements tells anyone anything about the speaker's attitude, though, which is what this question is about.